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1.

The U.S. Army Unit Advisor in Vietnam

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From the U.S. Army's The Big Picture television series, 1950-1975.; "What happens when an American soldier is assigned as a Military Advisor in Vietnam? This week' s episode follows a United States Army Officer through his entire tour of duty on this vital and dangerous mission in defense of the free world."--National Archives and Records Administration.
Online
1963
2.

Why Vietnam

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From the U.S. Army's The Big Picture television series, 1950-1975.; "This film documents the buildup to the Vietnam War, from the withdrawal of French troops to the bombings of the U.S. Embassy and the intense fighting our troops engaged in to combat Ho Chi Minh and the Viet Cong. The footage features President Lyndon Johnson, Secretary of State Dean Rusk and Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara."--National Archives and Records Administration.
Online
1964; 1975
3.

Your Army Reports: No. 12

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From the U.S. Army's The Big Picture television series, 1950-1975. A U.S. Army Air Defense Command's (ARADCOM) missile battery, documenting the war in Vietnam, the meeting of the Association of the United States Army.
Online
1950; 1975
4.

LBJ and Vietnam: In the Eye of the Storm

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Uses secret recordings of phone conversations, cabinet meetings and other discussions between Lyndon Johnson and key officials of his administration, along with reenactments of those meetings to offer a different view of the Vietnam War and its effect on Johnson's presidency.
Online
2002
5.

Interview With Frederick G. Dutton, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Fred Dutton was Special Assistant to US President John F. Kennedy at the time President Kennedy considered committing resources to Vietnam. He characterizes Kennedy as a cautious man, but one who for strategic reasons wanted to stem the spread of communism in Asia. However, Dutton says this was far down Kennedy's list of priorities, well below domestic issues. Dutton is critical of those who would take Vietnam out of the context of all other issues faced by the President, such as the need to appear strong following the Bay of Pigs. He also discusses the thinking behind the President's appointing Averell Harriman to coordinate Southeast Asia policy at the State Department.
Online
1983
6.

Interview With Herbert Bluechel, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Herbert Bluechel served in Vietnam in the mid-1940s. He recalls British General Gracey's entry into Saigon and describes a meeting between French General Philippe Leclerc and O.S.S. officer Peter Dewey; Dewey would be the first American casualty in Vietnam, prior to the official start of the war. He recounts the events surrounding Dewey's death in detail. Finally, he discusses the mood of the country and Vietnamese attitudes towards the French, the British, and the Americans.
Online
1983
7.

Interview With Jane Barton, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Jane Barton went to Vietnam with the American Friends' Service Committee to work in a rehabilitation clinic and to observe the treatment of prisoners in Quang Ngai, South Vietnam. She describes evidence of torture and the complicity of the American government. She describes the damages inflicted on Vietnamese civilians by relocation programs and by landmines. Finally, she discusses the negative attitudes of the Vietnamese in her area towards the government of South Vietnam and the American presence.
Online
1983
8.

Interview With Lloyd M. (Mike) Rives, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Mike Rives was an American diplomat in Cambodia from 1969 - 1970. Mr. Rives describes the difficulty in dealing with Prince Sihanouk, and the atmosphere in Phnom Penh after Lon Nol took over the government. He speaks about the American incursion into Vietnam and his discussions with General Alexander Haig about giving military support to Lon Nol's government.
Online
1983
9.

Interview With Paul M. Kattenburg, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Paul M. Kattenburg spent five months in 1952 at the US Embassy in Saigon, and from 1954 to 1963 worked in the Research and Analysis Division of the State Department. He notes that at the time there was a scarcity of Vietnam experts available due to the relative isolation of the region and the lingering effects of McCarthyism. Kattenberg also describes Saigon scene in 1952 and his impression of Bao Dai's government. Kattenberg states that the continued support Ngo Dinh Diem was decided by the US Ambassador to Vietnam Frederick Reinhardt. During this period the United States was not yet fully involved in Vietnam and considered to be subordinate to the French.
Online
1983
10.

Interview With Philip Geoffrey Malins, 1982 [electronic resource]

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British General Philip Geoffrey Malins recounts his arrival in Saigon in 1945, describing the situation as "peaceful." Malins recalls being able to drive around the outskirts of Saigon without much trouble, and how that situation soon began to deteriorate. Malins also talks about his superior General Gracey as a humane, loyal person who served as a father figure to Malins. Malins continues talking about his job and the responsibility he had to ensure there was enough food for his people and the French civil population during the postwar famine in Vietam. Malins arranged for an open market that would allow anyone to buy food. He describes the policy surrounding the market and how it affected the troops as well as the civilians.
Online
1983
11.

Interview With Richard C. Holbrooke [2], 1982 [electronic resource]

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Between 1963-1966 Richard Holbrooke completed diplomatic service first as a provincial representative for the Agency for International Development (AID), then as Staff Assistant to Ambassadors Maxwell Taylor and Henry Cabot Lodge. Holbrooke talks about his work in Vietnam, the assessments he had to complete and how the information he gathered while on the ground in Vietnam differed from that which we received from the United States Government. He refers to this as the "Credibility Gap;" the making of decisions by the US Government on incorrect information. Holbrooke also states that the most tragic mistake made by the United States Government was that it could "bleed an Asian communist enemy into the point of fading away." He then begins to recall when his perceptions about Vietnam b [...]
Online
1983
12.

Interview With Richard M. Moose, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Richard Moose was on the staff of the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1969 - 1975. He describes his mission in Vietnam after the ceasefire in 1974 to assess the situation of how the South Vietnamese were positioned in terms of military equipment provided by the Americans and the possibilities of South Vietnam's survival. He mentions that the strategies in Vietnam and Cambodia were doomed to failure and that by the 1970s it was clear that the end was near. Mr. Moose details his report that led to the evacuation of Saigon, and reflects upon the meanings of the Vietnam War.
Online
1983
13.

Interview With Robinson Risner, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Robinson Risner was an Air Force pilot who was shot down over North Vietnam and captured by the North Vietnamese. He was held for over seven years and was repeatedly tortured. He relates his story of being shot down and captured by the North Vietnamese, and then the ordeal of his imprisonment and torture in the "Hanoi Hilton" prison camp. General Risner recalls his feelings during the "Christmas Bombing" and upon hearing of the peace negotiations, and toward the anti-war protesters in the United States.
Online
1983
14.

Interview With Roger Hilsman, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Roger Hilsman worked in the Kennedy Administration, first as director of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research and then as the Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs. He was criticized for drafting a cable on behalf of President Kennedy to the American Ambassador to South Vietnam instructing the Ambassador to give direct support to the opponents of President Ngo Dinh Diem. He describes the Kennedy White House as youthful and confident but shaken when Soviet Premier Khrushchev announced his support for insurgencies around the world. He says this announcement paved the way for the US counterinsurgency operations in Vietnam. Hilsman says he tried to convince Kennedy that the way to fight guerillas was with guerillas themselves. He also recounts Kennedy [...]
Online
1983
15.

Interview With U. Alexis (Ural Alexis) Johnson, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Deputy Ambassador to the Republic of Vietnam, Alexis Johnson recalls the 1954 Geneva Conference when the French were pressuring the United States to send additional assistance to their battle in Vietnam in the form of air raids. Johnson recalls trying to form a pact with the other countries at the Conference regarding collective action against communist aggression in Vietnam. Johnson recalls the US view of the Vietnamese conflict as a fluid one in which the French were the major players. Johnson relates the eventual agreement between the French and the Viet Minh to draw a line at the seventeenth parallel, dividing Vietnam into north and south sections. The United States, while not fully satisfied with the agreement, decided to uphold it and avoid the use of force to upset it.
Online
1983
16.

60 Minutes Honor Thy Children [electronic resource]: Classic

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This 60 Minutes Classic segment gives an update on a 1982 60 Minutes segment which looks at American-Asian children left behind in Vietnam after the war. Mike Wallace reports.
Online
1999
17.

60 Minutes: Back to My Lai [electronic resource]

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March 29, 1998 - Larry Colburn and Hugh Thompson, members of an Army helicopter crew, risked their lives in 1968 to save Vietnamese civilians from American GIs during the My Lai massacre. Now, Colburn and Thompson return to My Lai with Mike Wallace to meet the survivors.
Online
1998
18.

60 Minutes: Agent Orange [electronic resource]

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Almost 4 decades after the Vietnam war ended the U.S. government has finally agreed to help clean up the highly toxic dioxin residue left behind at its former airfield in Danang. It was the main air base where the defoliant Agent Orange was loaded onto planes and sprayed on jungles to deny cover to Vietnamese fighters. In this report producer Andrew Tkach and Christiane Amanpour examined the terrible toll dioxin may have had on U.S. servicemen and Vietnamese civilians.
Online
1999
19.

60 Minutes: Leave No One Behind [electronic resource]

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60 Minutes II reports on teams of investigators on a forensic search for lost war heroes. Vicki Mabrey reports.
Online
2004
20.

Interview With Henry Cabot Lodge, 1979 [electronic resource]

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Henry Cabot Lodge was a United States Senator from Massachusetts, and Ambassador to South Vietnam from 1963 -1964. He viewed South Vietnam's president Ngo Dinh Diem as an ineffective leader, and tacitly supported the coup that overthrew him. Mr. Lodge discusses the circumstances of his appointment as Ambassador, and his impressions of Vietnam prior to going. He recounts the advice and instruction he received from other advisers, especially regarding Diem, and details his role in the events surrounding the coup. He describes Diem's personality and his own view of the war after the coup.
Online
1983