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1.

Visual Arts [electronic resource]

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Reveals how paintings, sculpture, and other works of visual art express ideals in their own language. Demonstrates how to identify the style, form, and subject matter of appropriate works to help draw out the cultural setting of literary texts.
Online
2003
2.

Political History [electronic resource]

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Explains how speeches, protest posters, and cartoons capture the political views of various groups. Pairing the study of literature with close readings of appropriate political artifacts, this session demonstrates how to comprehend the place and time of a text.
Online
2003
3.

Social History [electronic resource]

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Introduces the discipline of social history, which focuses on the lives of ordinary people. Demonstrates how to find clues to personal histories in diaries, photos, music, and clothing. Illustrates how literature can be more fully understood when paired with social history artifacts that reflect the cultural norms of the time.
Online
2003
4.

Domestic Architecture [electronic resource]

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Explains how furniture placement and interior design relay information about social attitudes and norms of behavior. Explores what these interior spaces reveal about the cultural setting and period of a literary text.
Online
2003
5.

Oral Histories [electronic resource]

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Oral histories can serve a dual role in the classroom: as a type of literature to be studied in itself and as artifacts that help explain other literary works. Focuses on how folk songs, interviews, and other oral histories provide alternative views of a text's cultural setting.
Online
2003
6.

Ceremonial Artifacts [electronic resource]

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Explores how objects used in religious ceremonies embody the spiritual beliefs of the cultures they represent. By better understanding these sacred beliefs, teachers learn to help their students connect to literary texts from unfamiliar cultural contexts.
Online
2003
7.

North America [electronic resource]

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Through studies of ethnic and economic diversity in Boston and suburban sprawl in Chicago, this session illustrates issues of urban development and expansion in North America. Classroom segments demonstrate how teachers can use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and census data to investigate similar issues in their own communities.
Online
2002
8.

Teaching for Understanding [electronic resource]

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Focuses on the Teaching for Understanding model, a framework for unit planning developed at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The onscreen teachers use the framework to analyze unit planning in classroom videos, plan for their own Social Studies units, and create a pictorial timeline of U.S. history that outlines an entire year of learning.
Online
2003
9.

Exploring Unity and Diversity [electronic resource]

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Because themes of unity and diversity surface within both academic content and classroom climate, this session focuses on strategies for teaching provocative issues in social studies as well as methods of addressing a diversity of learners. The onscreen teachers examine national documents for themes of unity and diversity, explore Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, and develop a mini-lesson on immigration and citizenship.
Online
2003
10.

Leaders, Community, and Citizens [electronic resource]

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In a First Grade class at the Rooftop Alternative School in San Francisco, Cynthia Vaughn helps her students differentiate between the titles and roles of elected officials at city, state, and country levels. After a class discussion outlining the various roles of these elected officials, students work in pairs to complete a chart, matching specific names with job titles and buildings. Each group reports its finding to the whole class. Finally, the students build their own fictitious community and explore and present the issues facing the town.
Online
2003
11.

Explorers in North America [electronic resource]

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Rob Cuddi, a Fifth Grade teacher at Winthrop Middle School in Winthrop, Massachusetts, introduces the theme of exploration in North America, posing three essential questions: How have people in history affected our lives today?; How do the human and physical systems of the Earth interact?; and What role do economies play in the foundation of our history?
Online
2003
12.

California Missions [electronic resource]

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Osvaldo Rubio, a bilingual Fourth Grade Social Studies teacher at Sherman Oaks Community Charter School in San Jose, California. focuses his geography lesson on the location and movement of the California missions. In groups, students create artistic, oral, written, and other more sophisticated audiovisual presentations on the themes of the unit. Some students use the Internet to download images, while others use a digital camera and editing software to create their own video presentations.
Online
2003
13.

State Government and the Role of the Citizen [electronic resource]

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Diane Kerr, a Fourth Grade teacher at Butcher Greene Elementary School in the ethnically diverse community of Grandview, Missouri,presents a lesson on the state of Missouri and its three branches of government. Students work in groups to create posters that represent the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government. They voice their concerns about what can be done to improve their lives and the life of the community. As a class, they work to understand the process of how a bill becomes a law.
Online
2003
14.

Using Primary Sources [electronic resource]

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In a unit on Colonial America, students in Kathleen Waffle's Fifth Grade class at John Muir Elementary School in San Bruno, California, examine the business of a successful silversmith who lived in Colonial Williamsburg. In small groups, the students use primary source documents (advertisements) and artifacts to identify the business strategies used by the silversmith. They translate a historic contract between a master and an apprentice and examine how colonial apprenticeships compare with present-day job pursuits.
Online
2003
15.

Public Opinion and the Vietnam War [electronic resource]

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Liz Morrison, a Ninth Grade American History teacher at Parkway South High School in suburban St. Louis, explores how public opinion was shaped by key events in the Vietnam War. Students create a timeline and work in groups to discover how public opinion changed from approval to disapproval over the course of the war. The students view television footage from this period and listen to popular music that reflects both sides of public opinion. Ms. Morrison helps her students make connections from the Vietnam War to political attitudes in their world today.
Online
2003
16.

Gender-Based Distinctions [electronic resource]

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In Tim Rockey's 10th Grade World History class at Sunnyslope High School in Phoenix, Arizona, Mr. Rockey reviews the concept of civil rights, with a focus on women's rights. Students evaluate the "reasonableness" standard as set by the court and come to understand where the court has drawn the line for gender-based decisions. They explore the following questions: Can public taverns cater only to men? Can females be excluded from contact sports? Can a state military college exclude women? After examining Supreme Court cases, students render a judgment of the validity of the standard of equal rights.
Online
2003
17.

Public Policy and the Federal Budget [electronic resource]

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Leslie Martin's ninth-graders create, present, revise, and defend a federal budget. After assuming the roles of the President and his or her advisors to create a federal budget, students are introduced to the actual 2001 federal budget, and in a whole-class discussion, discuss some key concepts involved in creating it. Next, students return to cooperative learning groups, revise their budgets based on what they learned, present their revised budgets, and simulate a Congressional hearing. Highlights the integration of teacher-directed instruction with small-group work.
Online
2003
18.

Patriotism and Foreign Policy [electronic resource]

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U.S. government teacher Alice Chandler has her students create a Museum of Patriotism and Foreign Policy. The lesson alternates between whole-class discussion and small-group committee work as students create a gallery for the museum using their respective arts concentration as the medium. The lesson concludes with students presenting their gallery contributions in dance, music, theatrical performances, and visual presentations. This lesson highlights small-group work as a constructivist methodology.
Online
2003
19.

The Virginia Company [electronic resource]: America's Corporate Beginnings

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Examines how primary sources can illuminate historical events. This workshop tells the story of Jamestown, a less-than-successful example of America's capitalist beginnings and a colony as a business operation. Drawing on contemporary accounts, workshop participants assume the roles of colonists and shareholders to argue the future of the Virginia Company's settlement at Jamestown.
Online
2001
20.

The Lowell System [electronic resource]: Women in a New Industrial Society

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In the earliest days of American industry, the Boston Manufacturing Company created an innovative, single-location manufacturing enterprise at Lowell that depended on the recruitment of female mill workers. This workshop debates the impact of this new form of employment on the work force. Participants investigate workers' experiences first-hand through diaries, letters, published accounts, and official mill postings.
Online
2001