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1.

Harvest of Empire

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This powerful documentary exposes the direct connection between the long history of U.S. intervention in Latin America and the immigration crisis we face today. From the territorial expansionist policies that decimated the young economies of Mexico, Puerto Rico and Cuba, to the covert operations that imposed oppressive military regimes in the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador, Harvest of Empire provides an unflinching look at the origins of the growing Latino presence in the United States. Adapted from the landmark book written by journalist Juan Gonzalez, the film tells the story of an epic human saga that is largely unknown to the great majority of citizens in the U.S., but must become part of our national conversation about immigration.
DVD
2012
Clemons (CHECKED OUT)
2.

Purgatorio: A Journey Into the Heart of the Border

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Director Rodrigo Reyes re-imagines the Mexico/U.S. border as a mythical place comparable to Dante's purgatory. Leaving politics aside, he takes a fresh look at the brutal beauty of the border and the people caught in its spell. By capturing a stunning mosaic of compelling characters and broken landscapes on the border, Reyes reflects on the flaws of human nature and the powerful absurdities of the modern world.
DVD
2015; 2013
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

The Shadow Circus: The CIA in Tibet

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Discusses how the CIA aided the Tibetan people in their war of resistance against the Chinese invasion during the 1950s and 60s.
DVD
 
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Joe Polowsky, an American Dreamer: Joe Polowsky, Amerikanskiĭ Mechtatelʹ = Joe Polowsky, Ein Amerikanischer Träumer

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Joe Polowsky, later a Chicago taxi driver, was one of the American soldiers who met up with Soviet troops at the Elbe river in 1945. He continued to embody their mutual promise of a committment to peace, even unto his burial at the site of that historic wartime encounter.
VHS
1986
Ivy (By Request)
6.

Timothy Wirth

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A lecture by Timothy Wirth, Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs, on how we are thinking about redesigning our foreign policy. Lecture was given as final part of the Declaration of interdependence.
VHS
1997
Ivy (By Request)
7.

Global Politics [electronic resource]: U.S. And the World

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Examines the need for the United States to use the tools of foreign policy in ways that recognize the growing interdependence of nations, implementing both traditional and new forms of military, trade, and diplomatic strategies to promote benefits for America and the world as a whole. Examples include the controversy over America's participation in Operation Endeavor in Bosnia-Herzegovia, the use of international trade as an instrument of U.S. foreign policy in South Korea, and Jody William's creation of a non-governmental organization to globally ban the use of landmines.
Online
2003
8.

Paul Martin

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"Participants: Paul Martin, Canadian Minister of Health and Welfare, interviewed by William Bradford Huie and Elliot Haynes. Topics: Increased prosperity, economic and population growth in Canada, comparison between U.S. and Canadian standards of living, problems of immigration, heavy taxation, lack of social services in Canada, and strained relations between the United States and Britain."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, May 15, 1953 (200LW585).
Online
1953
9.

Sayed Amjad Ali

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1953: "Participants: Sayed Amjad Ali, Pakistani Ambassador to the United States, interviewed by William Bradford Huie and Elliott Haynes. Topics: Pakistan's relations with India and the United States and the deterioration of relations between the Moslem nations and the United States."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, May 18, 1953 (200LW587). 1954: Pakistan's request to America for military assistance.
Online
1953
10.

Tell Me Cuba [electronic resource]

Beginning with a summary of Cuban history from the island's 16th-century subjugation by Spanish conquistadors to the 20th-century communist revolution, this program scrutinizes the current state of U.S./Cuba relations through the eyes of progressives, who want to put the past behind them for the benefit of Cubans still suffering from the decades-long U.S. embargo, and the anti-Castro expatriate community, which sees normalization of relations as a victory for despotism and a repudiation of their deeply held convictions. The political standoff between America and its communist neighbor has consistently defied remediation, and filmmaker Megan Williams does not pretend there is a universally acceptable solution. "Williams takes a complex and divisive subject and captures it with a clear [...]
Online
2010; 2006
11.

The Guantanamo Trap [electronic resource]

At Guantanamo Bay detention camp, history has proved that concepts of right and wrong can all too easily become distorted by expediency and ambiguity. This program examines the lives of high-profile individuals from both sides of the razor wire who have intimate knowledge of the horrors of Gitmo: Murat Kurnaz, a former inmate who was detained without trial for five years; former Navy officer Matthew Diaz, whose career was ruined by disclosing classified names of detainees to the Center for Constitutional Rights; Diane Beaver, author of a notorious memo defending the use of extreme interrogation techniques; and criminal prosecutor Gonzalo Boye, who has set himself the task of bringing representatives of the Bush administration to justice for crimes against humanity. Called "a fascinat [...]
Online
2011
12.

Making the World Safe for Democracy [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

As the United States reshaped Manifest Destiny for use in the 20th century, the concept came to be equated not with conquest and expansion, but with the spread of American values and institutions. Focusing on World War I and the Russian Revolution, the section "A New World Order" traces the deflected trajectory of President Wilson's idealistic plan to export democracy - a plan that ended in compromises and broken dreams. "Containment," which begins with World War II, examines the spread of communism in Asia and U.S. opposition to it via the Kennan policy of containment and the Truman Doctrine. And "Quagmire" discusses how the Kennedy and Johnson administrations felt duty-bound to escalate American political and military involvement in Vietnam as a part of an ideological proxy war bet [...]
Online
2010
13.

To Conquer or Redeem [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

With the closing of the American West, Manifest Destiny was in need of new direction. The section "New Frontiers" considers implications of Frederick Jackson Turner's Frontier Thesis as it scrutinizes U.S. history from the end of the Gilded Age to the brink of the Spanish-American War. "An Empire of Liberty" takes a step back to assess aspects of Manifest Destiny from its birth during the pre-Revolutionary era through Reconstruction. And "Benevolent Assimilation" provides an in-depth look at the Spanish-American War, the Philippines Insurrection, the annexations of Puerto Rico and Hawaii, and U.S. intervention in China during the Boxer Rebellion to illustrate how expanded economic influence, military might, and presidential powers contributed to U.S. imperialism during the administra [...]
Online
2010
14.

The Grand War of Civilizations [electronic resource]

For decades, Iraq was Saddam Hussein's sadistic stomping ground. Then it became George W. Bush's ideological battlefield. The pivot point was 9/11 and a perceived link between Saddam and al Qaeda, bringing calls for an invasion from top American and Western leaders. This program examines the consequences of that hasty decision-making process: misadventure on a grand scale, according to many observers, and an extremist backlash that engulfed Iraq in bloodshed. Viewers meet retired Major General James Marks, senior intelligence officer for coalition land forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom, and gain insight as to why the occupation and counter-insurgency faced so many problems. Events in both Fallujah and Baghdad are studied. Numerous accounts from victims of sectarian violence, ques [...]
Online
2011
15.

A New Muslim World? [electronic resource]

Osama bin Laden's death in 2011 was clearly a milestone in America's war on terror, but for those who study dramatic shifts in the West's relationship with the Islamic world, no event can compare with the Arab Spring. What does the wave of regime-toppling revolution and democratization that began in Tunisia in 2010 mean for the future of the Middle East and for international relations in general? This program searches for answers as it shows how the Arab Spring took root and expanded into the multifaceted movement that continues even today. It also shows how terrorist networks, hate-driven organizations, and hawkish governments still foment violent face-offs with their avowed adversaries, even as greater openness and individual freedoms appear across the Arab-speaking world. Developm [...]
Online
2011
16.

Bogged Down [electronic resource]

Terrorism. Extremism. Religious and sectarian violence. Should we study political and socioeconomic patterns in order to understand why these tragedies occur? Or are they far simpler than that? Are they ultimately about hate and nothing more? Traveling to three focal points of conflict, this program explores 21st-century manifestations of an age-old human problem - the need to destroy others who appear inferior, unworthy, or unholy - and how that flaw in the social psyche shapes today's clash of civilizations. Starting with U.S. President Barack Obama's 2009 Cairo speech as a reference point of moderation, the film spans the globe as it explores an entire spectrum of hate-driven behavior - from the Taliban's brutal repression of anything deemed un-Islamic (such as CD shops and kite f [...]
Online
2011
17.

The Nobel Peace Prize Documentary 2009 [electronic resource]: A New Era of Engagement

Awarding the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize to U.S. President Barack Obama may be the Nobel committee's most controversial decision of all time. This program examines the choice and its implications, as well as the background, accomplishments, and potential of the recipient. Produced by the Nobel Foundation, the film outlines Obama's diverse heritage and formative experiences, compiles opinions from a broad spectrum of political players, and assesses the 44th President's evolving foreign policy. Interviews feature Susan Rice, U.S. Representative to the UN; David Frum, speechwriter for President George W. Bush; Thorbjorn Jagland, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee; and others. Excerpts from Obama's September 2009 speech to the UN General Assembly and June 2009 speech at Cairo Universit [...]
Online
2010; 2009
18.

Bad Voodoo's War [electronic resource]

As a small part of the 2007 American military surge in Iraq, a group of National Guard infantrymen who call themselves The Bad Voodoo Platoon was deployed to run convoy security missions. Capturing the humanity and the grim realities of the Iraq war, this Frontline episode incorporates first-person accounts from Bad Voodoo soldiers and video from cameras given to them so that they could tell their own story of the conflict. As a result, viewers will closely follow platoon members through the perilous journeys and daily grinds of their tour of duty.
Online
2008
19.

Post-War Hopes, Cold War Dreams [electronic resource]

The 1950s in America were a time of nostalgia and neurosis. Factories poured out goods, the dollar was powerful, and the United States - filled with the heady optimism of victory in World War II - believed that it could politically, culturally, and militarily lead the world. But the decade also saw the solidification of the Iron Curtain in Europe, the entrenchment of Communism in China, years of so-called police action in Korea, and a Red Scare that divided Americans at home. Bill Moyers shows how an initial burst of optimism fostered an era of American conformity, in which fitting in led to a hostility and distrust of those who stood out.
Online
1984
20.

A Conversation With Margaret Mead [electronic resource]: From NBC's Wisdom Series

Providing an intriguing window into cultural anthropology as it was practiced and conceptualized during the mid-20th century, this 1959 NBC interview features renowned researcher Margaret Mead discussing her work with one of her students, William Mitchell. Mead explains her views on what Mitchell describes as the "happy savage" myth, largely dispelling the notion while referencing the idea of cultural ethos - the "emotional tone" of a society - and its variation from group to group. She also deftly articulates (several decades ahead of her time) the manner in which Western development and influences erode the cultural traditions and physical territories of indigenous peoples. Even today, viewers will find Mead's views on polygamy, morality, women's roles, and other topics riveting an [...]
Online
1959