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<span class="applied-filter-set"><span class="applied-filter"><span class="name-and-value"><span class="filter-name">Geographic Location</span><div class="sr-only">: </div><span class="filter-value">South America</span></span><a href="/video?f%5Bseries_title_facet%5D%5B%5D=Sue%C3%B1os+World+Spanish&amp;sort_key=received" aria-label="Remove this search limiter." class="remove-filter" role="button" tabindex="0" title="Remove this search limiter.">x</a></span> <span class="applied-filter"><span class="name-and-value"><span class="filter-name">Series</span><div class="sr-only">: </div><span class="filter-value">Sueños World Spanish</span></span><a href="/video?f%5Bregion_facet%5D%5B%5D=South+America&amp;sort_key=received" aria-label="Remove this search limiter." class="remove-filter" role="button" tabindex="0" title="Remove this search limiter.">x</a></span></span>
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1.

Chicas [electronic resource]

Hollywood is the epicenter of English-language entertainment, but there are plenty of other places that might be described as dream factories-not least in the Spanish-speaking world, where thriving film and TV industries create on their own terms. With a focus on television acting, this program offers examples of ways for budding Spanish-speakers to talk about their dreams and career aspirations. Viewers learn about the personal goals and ambitions of four young women who are students at the Televisa training school in Mexico City, where many popular Spanish-language soap operas (telenovelas) are produced.
Online
1995
2.

Mi Buenos Aires Querido [electronic resource]

Miguel Rep is one of Argentina's most famous cartoonists, and he knows his way around Buenos Aires as well as his way around a drawing easel. In this program, he sketches views of city landmarks and of his favorite bohemian haunts. In the process, he helps beginning Spanish speakers learn how to describe aspects of urban geography-from cafes to waterfronts to public buildings-while other Buenos Aires residents do their part to usher viewers through the city and the language. Featured locations include the Plaza de Mayo, the cemetery of Recoleta, the culturally rich barrio of Boedo, and the Plaza San Martin.
Online
1995
3.

Salsa [electronic resource]

Even in the world's largest metropolis, you can still get away from it all. Mexico City's suburb of Xochimilco is a popular place for family outings-and a great location for an up-and-coming restaurant. Following the Patino sisters (Monica, a chef, and Claudia, a designer) as they plan for the grand opening of their ambitious eatery, this program helps Spanish language learners practice ordering food and drinks and discuss other travel-related topics. Progress and occasional setbacks occur as the sisters' vision takes shape, adding a touch of suspense to this illuminating look at Mexican cuisine, culinary history, and entrepreneurship.
Online
1995
4.

Bienvenidos! [electronic resource]

Every coffee farmer dreams that this year's harvest will be a good one. In Colombia, farmers meet regularly to discuss the harvest-over a cup of coffee, naturally. Coffee is likewise a frequent centerpiece when Colombians want to make guests feel at home. All of which makes for a valuable collection of Spanish lessons that highlight the fine arts of hospitality, cooperation, and teamwork. Viewers are shown scenes of coffee growing, processing, and packaging-in addition to the crowning of a regional "Coffee Queen"-that help develop vocabulary and usage while building awareness of a vital aspect of Latin American culture.
Online
1995
5.

Barrio [electronic resource]

Guadalajara-Mexico's second largest city, and the capital of the state of Jalisco. Some 350,000 people have moved here from the poorer parts of Jalisco in search of employment and a better way of life. Dr. Marco Castillo has a dream-to improve the lives of the people of Guadalaraja with a comprehensive health system. This program helps foreign language students discuss Guadalara's social issues in Spanish as it explores Dr. Castillo's aim to establish health clinics; set up training programs in hygiene, diet, and first aid; and implement other measures designed to help people help themselves.
Online
1995
6.

Fiesta [electronic resource]

The Day of the Dead is Mexico's most important fiesta. In the city of Pátzcuaro, Mexico, local residents await and discuss the festival with great anticipation. This program highlights their activities leading up to, during, and following Dia de los Muertos, offering plenty of Spanish lessons in the process. Because locally made foods, drinks, and souvenirs are often a big part of the holiday, viewers of the program will find ample opportunity to absorb Spanish-language discussions of the shopping, baking, flower-gathering, and decorating that are all part of the preparations. Visitors to a cemetery on the night of the event share their thoughts and feelings about its meaning in their lives.
Online
1995
7.

El Viaje [electronic resource]

Crisscrossing the geographically diverse nation of Ecuador, this program follows the travels of a radio journalist who, while making his living in Quito, the capital city, has always dreamed of visiting remote places in which his broadcasts are heard. Viewers discover ways to ask for and discuss travel information in Spanish, as well as helpful words and phrases for marketplace bargaining and for appreciating the craftsmanship with which many rural Ecuadorians support themselves. Local spiritual and religious traditions are also explored as the journalist compiles and completes a radio report on his adventure.
Online
1995
8.

Romanticos [electronic resource]

From the beauty of ancient Aztec temples to the modern amenities of Mexico City, our neighbors to the south have much to offer the American visitor and Spanish language student. The same can be said for tourists who are from Mexico to begin with! This program follows a young couple as they enjoy their honeymoon in the country, engendering a progression of Spanish lessons that revolve around travel destinations and tourist activities. Cathedral sightseeing in the capital, Easter celebrations in Taxco, and the Teatro Juarez in Guanajuato all offer wonderful opportunities for learning important vocabulary and phrasings.
Online
1995
9.

Gaucho [electronic resource]

They are Argentina's version of the cowboy-legends in their time. Do they still exist or are they specters of the past? This program uses the mystique and the modern manifestation of the gaucho to help build Spanish language vocabulary and phrasing knowledge. Highlighting ways to compare life now to how it used to be, the video profiles the son of a gaucho as he manages the estate of El Tordillo in Buenos Aires province, a wide open area of farmland in which men on horseback once worked and roamed. Others who care for the estate are also featured, including its owners, who are contemplating opening it to tourism.
Online
1995
10.

El Bosque [electronic resource]

Costa Rica prides itself on being one of the most peaceful and democratic countries in all of Latin America. Now tourism has become the nation's number-one revenue earner-and the country's ecology could be under threat. Looking at ecotourism in Costa Rica, this program helps beginning Spanish speakers learn how to describe and compare things. Viewers are introduced to a biologist and tour guide who wants to see Costa Rica balance economic demands with the need to preserve species and natural habitats, and a researcher with INBio, the Institute of Biodiversity, who is charged with cataloging plant and insect life.
Online
1995
11.

De Moda [electronic resource]

Fashion is big business in Colombia. This program features top Colombian fashion designer Carlos Zapata on a location shoot in Cartagena. As it follows Zapata's professional activities, the video provides detailed lessons in how to express likes and dislikes in Spanish, especially those revolving around clothes, fashion accessories, and colors. Viewers will soon recognize that Zapata and his team are in the business of creating dreams for others, but the question also arises: what does the artist dream for himself? And how does that dream shed light on self-expression for speakers of Spanish?
Online
1995