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1.

The Secret Life of the Sun [electronic resource]

The sun is more active now than it's been for a decade, sending eruptions of super-heated plasma and vast waves of radiation towards Earth-with the potential to disrupt our lives in dramatic ways. Using satellite images and the expertise of Britain's leading solar scientists, Kate Humble and Helen Czerski reveal the inner workings of our very own star, and the influence its cycles of activity have on our planet.
Online
2013
2.

Solar Storms [electronic resource]: The Threat to Planet Earth

Activity on the surface of the Sun is ramping up, increasing the risk of massive storms of plasma. And what's more, these storms will continue to happen for a number of years. But what are solar storms, and what do they mean for life on Earth? Is there a way to lessen their impact? This program goes to the Space Weather Prediction Center in Boulder, Colorado, and to the National Solar Observatory to investigate.
Online
2012
3.

Solar Flares Can Disrupt Communications [electronic resource]

The sun is approaching its peak period of solar activity during its 11 year cycle.
Online
2012
4.

Destination Titan [electronic resource]

It was a voyage of exploration like no other. Intrigued by the similarity of Titan's atmosphere to that of a primordial Earth, scientists in 1997 sent a probe to Saturn's largest moon to test its surface for conditions that might harbor life. This fascinating program tells the story of the Cassini-Huygens probe and the engineering team who built it-a group of graduate students, led by researcher John Zernecki, working on a shoestring budget. Despite setbacks and a major last-minute glitch, the endeavor succeeded beyond expectations, yielding remarkable images of Titan's mountains, rock fields, and seas of liquid methane. With stunning re-creations of the probe's interplanetary trip, the video documents the joint NASA/ESA mission.
Online
2011
5.

Empire of the Sun [electronic resource]

From the fleeting moments of a solar eclipse to the battle between the solar wind and Earth's magnetic field to the hinterlands of space, in which our star is only a smudge of light this program showcases the beauty and vastness of the Sun's influence. In India, viewers experience a profound celestial divide when solar light and heat are completely shut off, if only for a few minutes. In Norway, the night sky glows with the Aurora Borealis as massive waves of solar particles create a light show that may have equivalents on neighboring planets. Shifting to far beyond the Earth, the film follows the Voyager spacecraft as it searches for the outer reach of the solar wind-but even here the Sun exerts control, as evidenced by clouds of comets.
Online
2011; 2010
6.

The Thin Blue Line [electronic resource]

It's hard to believe that only a flimsy envelope of gas protects life on our planet. But, as this program shows, Earth isn't the only world wrapped in a tenuous, constantly shifting blanket and at one time, there may have been even more. A visit to Africa's Namib Desert helps illustrate what happened to poor Mercury when, early on, it was stripped of its atmosphere and fully exposed to the Sun's heat. Aided by a stunning backdrop of Alaskan glaciers, the film segues to a study of Titan, Saturn's chief moon, which is shrouded in a thick, murky atmosphere. Earth's probes have detected massive lakes beneath the shroud, but their chemical make-up is not entirely understood-Titan's atmosphere does its job well.
Online
2011; 2010
7.

Dead or Alive [electronic resource]

Like Earth, most of the worlds that orbit the Sun are made of rock, but, geologically speaking, any kinship among the interplanetary legion largely ends there. Some of our neighbors are alive, as it were, while others are frozen artifacts of a long-vanished era. This program visits subjects in the solar kingdom that still show a pulse and examines the factors that have kept them active. Creating a frame of reference with a discussion of planetary size and a visit to Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano, the film takes viewers to a much larger mountain, the extinct Olympus Mons on Mars, then travels to a remote fragment of rock that should, by all rights, be cold and dead. Io, a moon of Jupiter, is home to extraordinary lava lakes and volcanic plumes.
Online
2011; 2010
8.

Aliens [electronic resource]

At the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, a submarine observes extraordinary life forms that thrive without heat or light. Organisms like these have raised expectations about Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. Patterns in Europa's surface ice suggest that, far below, aquatic life is possible. This program also assesses another compelling clue in the search for extraterrestrial biology: if bacteria breathing toxic gas can live in a desolate Mexican cave, could similar creatures also survive in newly-discovered caves on Mars? Despite these tantalizing scenarios, the film culminates in a celebration of life on Earth-in all its beauty, diversity, and sophistication, still the greatest wonder of the solar system.
Online
2011; 2010
9.

The Universe Video Clip Collection [electronic resource]

For the limitless imagination of a scientific mind, the ever-expanding universe is an ideal subject of inquiry! This collection of 50 video clips (45 seconds to 2 minutes 30 seconds each) uses high-quality film footage and detailed animations to investigate the structure of the universe, the stars, the Solar System, the planets of the Solar System, Earth and the Moon, astronomical observation, and space exploration. Video clips include: The Structure of the Universe-Introduction; The Big Bang; The Size of the Universe; The Galaxies; Galactic Clusters; The Milky Way; Active Galaxies; The Stars-Introduction; Origin and Classification of Stars; Low-Mass Stars; Massive Stars; Black Holes; Star Clusters; Star Clusters; The Constellations; The Solar System-Introduction; The Structure of t [...]
Online
2011; 2004
10.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Lucianne Walkowicz - Finding Planets Around Other Stars

How do we find planets - even habitable planets - around other stars? By looking for tiny dimming as a planet passes in front of its sun, TED Fellow Lucianne Walkowicz and the Kepler mission have found some 1,200 potential new planetary systems. With new techniques, they may even find ones with the right conditions for life.
Online
2011
11.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: David Christian - Big History

Backed by stunning illustrations, David Christian narrates a complete history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the Internet, in a riveting 18 minutes. This is "Big History": an enlightening, wide-angle look at complexity, life, and humanity set against our slim share of the cosmic timeline.
Online
2011
12.

Order Out of Chaos [electronic resource]

The pleasant order we see in our cosmic backyard was, ironically, carved from a chaotic cloud of gas. This program helps develop an understanding of that eons-long process and its ramifications. Studying Saturn's rings, perhaps the brightest jewel to emerge from the ancient celestial maelstrom, the film points out echoes of early-solar-system physics in Oklahoma tornadoes and an Icelandic lagoon. Viewers come to understand how gravity and other forces that kneaded the primordial gas cloud into shape also created one of the most frenzied and frightening phases in the solar system's history - when a rain of comets and asteroids turned our extraterrestrial neighborhood into an immense shooting gallery.
Online
2010
13.

Astronomy [electronic resource]

This video clip takes viewers to the Hubble Space Telescope and offers an overview of the groundbreaking discoveries that have been made and breath-taking images that have been taken using this instrument.
Online
2010
14.

Another Earth [electronic resource]

This program quantifies the life-sustaining conditions for a planet such as Earth. One planet among trillions, is Earth truly unique?
Online
2009
15.

Biggest Blasts [electronic resource]

This program catalogues the most powerful blasts in the universe, working its way up from massive meteor strikes, to supernova explosions and gamma ray bursts, to the detonation that started it all: the Big Bang.
Online
2009
16.

The Day the Moon Was Gone [electronic resource]

What if the Moon suddenly disappeared? This program paints a grim picture of a desolate Earth characterized by very little daylight, pitch-black nights, mega-hurricanes, and virtually no complex life.
Online
2009
17.

The Hunt for Ringed Planets [electronic resource]

Planetary rings contain the story of the birth of the Solar System and entire distant galaxies. This program looks at Saturn's rings and then hunts for rings around Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto, Mars, and even Earth.
Online
2009
18.

It Fell From Space [electronic resource]

From space rocks crashing through houses, to cosmic boulders triggering mass extinctions, to rocket parts landing on front lawns, this program examines objects that fall from the heavens.
Online
2009
19.

Asteroids [electronic resource]

This program investigates the effects of meteors, asteroids, and meteorites on the planet - a detective story involving vast mineral riches, mass death from above, and clues to the formation of life on Earth.
Online
2009
20.

Birth of the Earth [electronic resource]

This program investigates the most fundamental geological mystery of all: the first billion years of Earth's existence. Experts illustrate how the planet first formed from the dust of the solar system, molten rock solidified to become land, oceans filled with water, and life first arrived on the planet.
Online
2009