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1.

Spies of Mississippi

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Enter the chilling world of anti-civil rights espionage. The film reveals in shocking detail the state of Mississippi's effort to undermine the civil rights movement using a vast network of spies. Their identities will be shocking. Whites and Blacks spied for Old Dixie. And the Sovereignty Commission would stop at nothing, even murder, to retain the 'Mississippi way of life.'
DVD
2014; 2013
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Freedom Summer

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In the hot and deadly summer of 1964, the nation could not turn away from Mississippi. Over ten memorable weeks known as Freedom Summer, more than 700 student volunteers joined with organizers and local African Americans in a historic effort to shatter the foundations of white supremacy in one of the nation's most segregated states, even in the face of intimidation, physical violence, and death.
DVD
2014; 2010
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Prom Night in Mississippi

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In 1997, actor Morgan Freeman, a resident of the small town of Charleston, Miss., offered to pay for the senior prom at Charleston High School under one condition: the prom must be racially integrated. His offer was ignored. In 2008 he offered again, and the offer was accepted, changing the tradition of two separate proms for blacks and whites that had endured since the high school was integrated in 1970. Shows the problems and lessons learned as the event was planned and held. With comments from Morgan Freeman, students, and others. Intended to explore attitudes of racial intolerance that still persist today. In 2008, Charleston High School had 415 students, 70% black and 30% white.
DVD
2009
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Prince Among Slaves

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In 1788, a slave ship sailed from the Gambia River, its hold laden with a profitable but highly perishable cargo - hundreds of men, women and children bound in chains. Eight months later, a handful of survivors found themselves for sale in Natchez, Mississippi. One of them, a 26-year-old named Abdul Rahman, made an astonishing claim: he was a prince of an African kingdom larger and more developed than the newly formed United States. This is the true story of an African prince who endured the humiliation of slavery without every losing his dignity or hope of freedom.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

The Siege of Vicksburg

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Online
2008
6.

Small Town Gay Bar

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"Deep in the heart of the "Bible Belt," homosexuals still face intolerance and adversity. Several spirited bar owners, however, have shown the courage to create places for people to call home. ... Kevin Smith, presents an intimate portrait of establishments that provide much more than an evening of entertainment."--Container.
DVD
2007; 2006
Clemons (Stacks)
7.

Mississippi Son [electronic resource]: A Filmmaker's Journey Home

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Tells the heartwrenching and heartwarming stories that tells the stories of the people, the culture and the future in the wake of Hurricane Karina. Filmmaker Don Wilson returns home to talk to those who lived through the hurricane.
Online
2007
8.

LaLee's Kin: The Legacy of Cotton

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"For generations, the legacy of the cotton industry for African-Americans in the Mississippi Delta has been hardscrabble poverty and virtual illiteracy. This compelling program focuses on the family unit in crisis and the urgent need for education reform through the stories of two remarkable individuals."--Container.
DVD
2006
Clemons (Stacks)
9.

Freedom Summer

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Online
2006
10.

Panola

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This documentary film focuses on the life of an African American man living in Natchez, Mississippi at the height of the civil rights movement. He simply talks about his living and working conditions, and tries to make sense of the violence and non-violence efforts to break down segregation.
DVD
2005; 1970
Clemons (Stacks)
11.

Black Natchez

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In 1965, as the civil rights movement was heating up in the South, Edward Pincus and David Neuman traveled down to Natchez, Miss. to document what was happening in the Black community. The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the NAACP were both working to organize the Black community, each with a very different approach, which created deep factions in the community's struggle against segregation.
DVD
2005; 1965
Clemons (Stacks)
12.

The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till

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The film that helped reopen one of history's most notorious cold case civil rights murders is the result of the director's 10-year journey to uncover the truth. In August, 1955, Mamie Till-Mobley of Chicago sent her only child, Emmett Louis Till, to visit relatives in the Mississippi Delta. Little did she know that only 8 days later, Emmett would be abducted from his Great-Uncle's home, brutally beaten and murdered for one of the oldest Southern taboos : whistling at a white woman in public. It was Beauchamp's nine years of investigation, summarized in the film, that was primarily responsible for the Justice Department reopening the case.
DVD
2005
Clemons (Stacks)
13.

The Murder of Emmett Till

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The murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began.
DVD
2004; 2003
Clemons (Stacks)
14.

A Tale of Two Rivers

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A tale of two rivers shows how America harnessed two of its mightiest rivers and put them to work for its citizens. The projects - the Mississippi River's system of levees and floodways and the Colorado River's Hoover Dam - constitute vastly different engineering efforts.
VHS
2004
Ivy (By Request)
15.

Mississippi and the 15th Amendment

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A college student, a schoolteacher and a fellow of the National Science Foundation were all three ruled illiterate by the local circuit clerk and ineligible to vote. Filmed in 1962, this program reveals the double standards and the dangers faced by African-Americans registering to vote in Mississippi. Interviews with local officials, segregationists, lawyers, clergy and citizens on both sides of the color line expose what amounted to a tacit conspiracy to deprive certain people of their constitutional right to stand up and be counted.
DVD
2003; 1962
Clemons (Stacks)
16.

The Murder of Emmett Till

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The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began.
DVD
2003
Law (Klaus Reading Room) Map
17.

The Intolerable Burden

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Documentary film of how Mae Bertha and Matthew Carter enrolled the youngest eight of their thirteen children in the public schools of Drew, Mississippi in 1965, which were all white. The Drew school board had initiated a "freedom of choice" plan to bring the district in compliance with the 1964 Civil Rights Act, but Blacks were not expected to choose all white schools.
VHS
2002
Ivy (By Request)
18.

Fatal Flood

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"In the spring of 1927, after weeks of incessant rains, the Mississippi River went on a rampage from Cairo, Illinois, to New Orleans, inundating hundreds of towns, killing as many as a thousand people and leaving a million homeless. In Greenville, Mississippi, efforts to contain the river pitted the majority black population against an aristocratic plantation family, the Percys-- and the Percys against themselves."--http://shop.pbs.org.
VHS
2001
Ivy (By Request)
19.

Standing Tall: Women Unionize the Catfish Industry

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The boom in Mississippi catfish farming, in the 1980s, required processing plants and hundreds of workers. The mostly black female workforce had to work, in noisy and wet factories for minimum wage, without any benefits, bathroom breaks or recourse if a worker was mistreated. The Mississippi Delta, at the time, was notoriously poor, neglected, and resistant to change. This historical documentary chronicles the risky and difficult effort of a few women working at Delta Pride Catfish to organize a United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) local 1529 at their plant. The 1986 union election victory surprised many locals, especially management at Delta Pride. In 1990, the workers at Delta Pride struck for two months and won better wages and working conditions. The strike established local [...]
Online
2001
20.

Mississippi Horizons

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A lecture by Anuradha Mathur commenting on the lower Mississippi landscape and other landscape projects.
VHS
2000
Ivy (By Request)