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1.

Triple Consciousness

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"Akosua Adoma Owusu is a Ghanaian-American filmmaker, producer and cinematographer whose award-winning films and installation work address the collision of identities, where the African immigrant located in the United States has a "triple consciousness." Owusu interprets Du Bois' notion of double consciousness and creates a third cinematic space or consciousness, representing diverse identities including feminism, queerness and African immigrants interacting in African, white American, and black American culture."--Container
DVD
2019; 2005
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Fold Crumple Crush: The Art of el Anatsui

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A powerful portrait of Africa's most widely acclaimed contemporary artist. An insider's view of the artist's practice, the ingenious steps and thousands of hours of labor that convert used bottle tops into huge, opulent wall hangings. Behind the charming, easy-going artist we meet a man mysterious even to his dearest friends. The film circles around Anatsui -- we see the celebrated artist at the Venice Biennale, in his home town, inside his studio directing a score of assistants.
Online
2018; 2011; 2019
4.

Eight Films by Jean Rouch

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"Jean Rouch was an inspiration for the French New Wave, and a revolutionary force in ethnography and the study of Africa. Beginning in 1955 with his most controversial film The Mad Masters, through 1969's darkly comic Little by Little, these films represent the most sustained flourishing of Rouch's practice of "shared anthropology," a process of collaboration with his subjects. Astonishing on their own terms, now restored and released for the first time, Eight films by Jean Rouch is essential for anyone interested in better understanding the development of ethnography and the cross-currents of colonialism and post-colonial social change in Africa, as well as documentary film practice, film history, and world cinema as a whole. Included in this box set are eight newly restored films o [...]
DVD
2017
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

Families of Ghana: Families of the World

Deborah lives with 12 extended family members in a family compound in a rural village in southern Ghana. Learn about family structure there. In Accra, Ghana's capital, ten-year-old Emmanuel lives with his sister, mother, father and aunt.
Online
2014; 2009
6.

African Christianity Rising

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"What does Christianity's explosive growth in Africa mean for the church and for the world? For over a decade, award-winning documentary film-maker, author and scholar James Ault has explored these questions, with guidance from leading thinkers on the subject, filming personal stories in Ghana and Zimbabwe in the range of churches found today in sub-Saharan Africa. He shows churches with ordinary human problems and returns some years later to find out what has happened to the people and churches portrayed." --back of container.
DVD
2013
Clemons (Stacks)
7.

Families of Ghana

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Follows the daily life of two children and their families living in Ghana. Learn about their life, family and culture as you follow them from home to school and all points in between.
DVD
2012; 2009
Clemons (Stacks)
8.

Fold Crumple Crush: The Art of el Anatsui

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A powerful portrait of Africa's most widely acclaimed contemporary artist. An insider's view of the artist's practice, the ingenious steps and thousands of hours of labor that convert used bottle tops into huge, opulent wall hangings. Behind the charming, easy-going artist we meet a man mysterious even to his dearest friends. The film circles around Anatsui -- we see the celebrated artist at the Venice Biennale, in his home town, inside his studio directing a score of assistants.
DVD
2011
Clemons (Stacks)
9.

West Africa Today: The Lebanese and Chinese Entrepreneurs

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In this age of globalization, here is a cameo portrait of how the local population of a "developing" African nation responds to the advances of foreigners bringing economic growth, but also potential cultural conflict. The film traces the history of Lebanese settlement in Ghana and Senegal from the 1860 s, when the first families arrived in the "new world" thinking they had landed in America. They quickly assimilated, learned the language, established retail stores, and interacted closely with the local population. The Lebanese prospered until the 1970's when nationalistic governments in Ghana and Senegal started pushing them out of retail business and into wholesale. The arrival of Chinese business owners and shopkeepers in the 1990s further impacted an already weakened Lebanese eco [...]
Online
2011
10.

Jaguar

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One of Jean Rouch's classic ethnofictions, the film follows three young Songhay men from Niger-- Lam Ibrahim, Illo Goudel'ize, and the legendary performer Damouré Zika-- on a journey to the Gold Coast (modern day Ghana). Drawing from his own fieldwork on intra-African migration, the results of which he published in the 1956 book Migrations au Ghana, Rouch collaborated with his three subjects on an improvisational narrative. The four filmed the trip in mid-1950s, and reunited a few years later to record the sound, the participants remembering dialogue and making up commentary. The result is a playful film that finds three African men performing an ethnography of their own culture.
DVD
2010; 1967
Clemons (Stacks)
11.

Witches of Gambaga

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The Witches of Gambaga is the extraordinary story of a community of women condemned to live as witches in Northern Ghana. Painful experience and insight come together to create an intimate portrait of the lives of women ostracized by their communities.
DVD
2010
Clemons (Stacks)
12.

A Fresh Look at Mali, Ghana, and Nigeria [electronic resource]

This program focuses on the western African countries of Mali, Ghana, and Nigeria. In Bamako, Segou, and Djenne, Jonathan Dimbleby learns how mopeds are moving Mali into a better future; meets a traditional wedding singer whose songs are uncustomarily female-empowering; watches enterprising sand-diggers at work in the Niger River; and visits the intricate Djenne mosque. In Kumasi and Accra, he views the Ghanaian Akwasidae Festival; spends time with the progressive King of the Ashanti; stops by the set of the reality TV show Soccer Academy; and attends an important fashion show. And in and around Lagos, he tours a Nigerian-owned and -operated cement-producing plant and meets a pair of homegrown hip-hop stars.
Online
2010
13.

Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra, Ghana

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Hallelujah!: Legendary drummer Ghanaba and the Winneba Youth Choir perform Handel's Hallelujah Chorus. Also includes a conversation with Ghanaba about Africa, jazz, and European music.; Accra Trane Station: "Nii Noi Nortey, afrifone instrument inventor and sound sculptor, and experimental percussionist Nii Otoo Annan present the African legacy of John Coltrane"--Container.; A por por funeral for Ashirifie: In March 2008 the La Drivers Union Por Por Group lost one of its members. The film documents the funeral performed and discusses Por Por's relation to the New Orleans jazz funeral.
DVD
2009
Clemons (Stacks)
14.

Me Broni Ba

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A film that combines montages of hair salons in Ghana with various images of Western pop culture, invoking a clash of cultures and communities. The film mixes grainy black & white footage with colorful shots of billboards and murals advertising various hair styles. It incorporates audio snippets of beauty instruction and tips from the 1950s. The filmmaker uses the resulting comparisons to explore the legacy, changes, and ongoing effect that European Colonialism has dealt to African culture.
DVD
2009
Clemons (Stacks)
16.

Salt Harvesters of Ghana

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This starkly beautiful film exemplifies the burden borne by African women to survive and support their families. The Ghanaian women who live on a lagoon in Ada, mine for salt with their bare hands during the three month-long dry season. Ankle deep in brackish water, they bend, scoop, bag and tote the raw salt, often developing sores and swellings. But they are happy to have this seasonal work and their indomitable spirit shines through. They boast that the men would not be as skillful in collecting and cleaning the salt. Their families depend on the meager income from the sale of salt to provide food and clean water. Women have done this back-breaking work for the last three hundred years. Although they dream of improving their lives with their income, in the end they have to spend a [...]
Online
2009
17.

Ghana [electronic resource]

This documentary studies the cultural landscape of Ghana through the lens of that country's television programming. TV shows include… Thank God It's Friday, News Reports, Agenda, Colonial Court, Mmaa Nkommo, Religious Programs, Soccer Academy, Children's Channel.
Online
2009
18.

Frontline World: Stories From a Small Planet, June 23, 2009

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As the digital television conversion makes tens of millions of analog TVs obsolete and Americans continue to trash old computers and cell phones at alarming rates, FRONTLINE/WORLD presents a global investigation into the dirty secret of the digital age -- the dumping of hundreds of millions of pounds of electronic waste around the world each year. Tracking "e-waste" to the slums of Ghana and the far-off provinces in China, producer/correspondent Peter Klein and his team of graduate journalism students fan out around the world to document the growing impact of this toxic trash on those who desperately scavenge it for precious metals. They also explore the potential threats to privacy, as criminal gangs attempt to harvest data from America's old computers and cell phones and exploit it [...]
DVD
2009
Clemons (Stacks)
19.

West Africa - Ghana and the Ivory Coast [electronic resource]: Globe Trekker

This Globe Trekker video follows Megan McCormick through West Africa, where Europeans uncovered gold in Ghana and ivory in the Cote d'Ivoire 500 years ago. Her trip includes a visit to a coffin shop in Ghana's capital, Accra, a traditional Ga funeral, a talking drum lesson from famous drummer Mustapha Addy, a brush with warthogs and elephants at the Mole Game Reserve, and a trip to Kumasi, birthplace of Kente cloth where the textile is still woven today after 400 years. Here Megan visits a goldsmith who makes trinkets for the Ashanti king and then heads to the slave castles of Elmina and Cape Coast where millions of slaves were tortured until 1865. Megan's journey ends with a wedding in the village of Neana, during which masked dancers perform extraordinary acrobatics, the village sa [...]
Online
2009
20.

Under the River: Exploited Children of Ghana

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In Ghana, children as young as three and as old as sixteen are often sent away from home to work in bondage for small payments, desperately needed by impoverished families. Some are given away by aunts, uncles, grandparents, or by their own overburdened mothers who will have one less mouth to feed and the equivalent of $40 (U.S.) each year. Others send their children away to learn a skill or as a means of discipline. The parents are often ignorant of the circumstances their children will face: brutal back-breaking and dangerous labor, utter deprivation even to the point of starvation, and exposure to parasites. Under the River follows one non-governmental organization's efforts to investigate and rescue trafficked children from bonded labor and return them to their parents. Many pare [...]
Online
2009