You searched for:

Geographic Location
:
Europe
x
Subject
:
Military History
x
15 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Revolution [electronic resource]

Today, much of the planet's population lives in a British-shaped world. How did this clutch of islands off the coast of Europe come to dominate the globe? The British presents the history of the British Isles from Stonehenge to World War Two using gripping drama reconstruction, the latest CG, time-lapse and aerial footage. Revolution covers Henry VIII's appropriation of the Catholic Church, empire expansion from New World wealth, the printing press, Shakespeare, the Puritan Movement, and the English Civil War.
Online
2012
2.

Defence in Depth

Historian Peter Barton concentrates on the second phase of the battle, from the middle of July to the middle of September 1916. Barton reveals how an Allied advance on objectives which should have lasted days and weeks took months and resulted in yet more carnage on the Somme battlefield.Whilst British tactics were unvarying, that of their German enemy evolved using the changing landscape of the battlefield. The slowness of the Allied advance during this period Barton explains by the emergence of new German tactics—defense in depth.
Online
2017; 2016
3.

The Fall of Quebec

1756—the beginning of the Seven Years’ War, which amongst others sets France against England. The conflict spreads throughout Europe, India, and North America. On the American continent, the war is considerable, weakening the French effort as the British strive to eliminate all French presence there. In 1759 the British launch their offensive and besiege the city of Quebec. After several months of siege, the besieged are beginning to run out of supplies. The French general Montcalm organizes several convoys. Wolfe, the English general, seizes the chance: he sends several of his ships to Quebec, which the French guards allow to pass, believing them to be the relief. By the time the ploy is discovered by the French, it is already too late. After their successful landing, the British, s [...]
Online
2017
4.

The Fall of France

When Hitler claimed restitution of Sudetenland, France and Britain abandoned their ally. Ignoring offers to help defend the Czechs, French leaders met with Hitler in Munich in Sep. 1938. Hitler performed like a statesmen, and French leaders signed a treaty that was in fact a death warrant for their own countries. Hitler felt that the floodgates were open and the wave became unstoppable.
Online
2017; 2014
5.

First Day

Historian Peter Barton explores the events leading up to and on the bloody first day of the offensive. Walking the battlefield, he explains the failures that led to over 20,000 British deaths and argues that to get a better understanding of events, one should not only confront what the British did badly but what their enemy did better. Based on research in German archives, Barton shows just how much they knew in advance about Allied plans through captured documents and interrogations of British prisoners and deserters.
Online
2017; 2016
6.

The War in Italy

In an initial failed attempt to become a partner the equal of Germany in the Axis Alliance, Mussolini ordered his troops towards the British positions in Egypt in September 1940. Mussolini, feeling secure in the shadow of Hitler's apparent invincibility, never dreamt that the War between Britain and Italy would culminate in his own death less than 5 years later.
Online
2017; 2014
7.

Battle of Berlin

The mantle of invisibility surrounding German forces had slipped an fallen since Stalingrad and panzer units suffering heavy loses. A revitalized red army began to payback hitler in a brutal attack as the last months of ww2 passed. Stalin was obsessed with the significance of one town which brought the most terrible end to WW2 in Berlin that anyone could have imagined.
Online
2017; 2014
8.

The Falklands War

The Battle between the UK and Argentina over claims to the Falkland Islands systematically merged weapons technology of air, sea, and ground. A UK invasion yielded a bombardment of speed, weaponry, and destruction.
Online
2017; 2003
9.

The Debacle

Inspired by newsreels, France, England, and Germany reveal their versions of the “truth” to their citizens. Between September 1939 and June 1940, we view how each side saw the inexorable plunge Europe took into chaos.
Online
2018; 2010
10.

Adrinople: Rome Against the Barbarians

Rome, 4th century AD. The Empire is now too vast to be ruled by a single man. For the first time, it is decided to divide it into two. Valentinian, an excellent general, rules the Western Empire. Valens, his brother, a far less talented man, governs the Eastern Empire. After receiving a delegation from the barbarian chiefs, Valentinian plunges into one of his habitual, violent rages. On this occasion, his body gives up: suffering a brain hemorrhage, he collapses and dies during the night. His son, Gratian, replaces him as head of the Western Empire at the worst possible moment. The Goths, driven from their own lands by the Huns, cross the Empire’s frontiers. Valens, Emperor of the East, brings his army home to Adrianople to confront the Goths. Rather than wait for reinforcements from [...]
Online
2017; 2016
11.

The Battle of Dunkirk

May 10, 1940. The Germans launch an offensive into Holland, Belgium, and Luxemburg. The French and British armies are caught off guard and find themselves surrounded, so they are ordered to pull back to Dunkirk. 400,000 men crowd onto the beaches and wait to be embarked back to England: Operation Dynamo begins as General Guderian’s Panzer divisions speed towards the town. As Guderian is about to launch a decisive assault on Dunkirk, he receives a direct order from Hitler to halt his advance. He will not be authorized to resume until three days later, on May 27, 1940. Taking advantage of this three-day reprieve, 224,686 British and 123,098 French have time to cross the Channel to safety in England—figures far higher than the Allies first hoped. While France is forced to sign the armis [...]
Online
2017
12.

Einstein and the Manhattan Project

Germany, 1933. Hitler becomes Chancellor. Albert Einstein, a confirmed pacifist, flees Nazi Germany and takes refuge in the United States. He fears for his life, but also for his research, which he refuses to allow to fall into the wrong hands. However, even without him, Germany discovers how to split the atom, thanks to Otto Hahn. The Second World War is looming. The threat of a nuclear Germany is ever closer... In August 1939, under pressure from physicists Leo Szilard and Eugene Wigner, Einstein writes a letter to President Roosevelt warning him of the possible development by Germany of “new bombs of a new, extremely powerful type.” While this letter’s aim was to warn the American authorities of the dangers of nuclear arms, it will have the opposite effect: Roosevelt launches the [...]
Online
2017; 2016
13.

The Phony War

Inspired by newsreels, France, England, and Germany reveal their versions of the “truth” to their citizens. Between September 1939 and June 1940, we view how each side saw the inexorable plunge Europe took into chaos.
Online
2018; 2010
14.

End Game

Historian Peter Barton concludes his history of the battle in the final months of the campaign. He shows how a remarkable German tactical revolution begun in the summer of 1916 continued throughout this period to frustrate the Allied advance. This would have profound implications, tragically extending the entire First World War far beyond Allied expectations. Barton also presents a new narrative which argues that the battle of the Somme ended not in the winter of 1916, but in the spring of 1917. And he reaches the conclusion that there was no British victory.
Online
2017; 2016
15.

Ancient Rome - the Rise and Fall of an Empire: Constantine

The fifth episode in the landmark drama-documentary series shows how the Emperor Constantine brought Christianity to the western world.
Online
2019; 2006