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1.

No Rest for the Weary [electronic resource]: Cultural Revolution and Its Origins

From World War II until Mao's death in 1976, the Chinese faced recurring hardships, the Cultural Revolution perhaps the most damaging to their traditional society. This program carefully traces the origins and implementation of Mao's agenda of social upheaval, bringing together documentary footage and firsthand accounts from those who experienced it. Among those interviewed is Song Yongyi, a history professor at Dickinson College who left China in order to write an account of the movement.
Online
2005; 2003
2.

The Unfortunate Generation [electronic resource]: Cultural Revolution and Beyond

Within two years of the Cultural Revolution, armed factions battled each other in Mao's name. To avoid civil war, Mao essentially banished his zealots to the countryside. This program chronicles the Cultural Revolution, its disastrous aftermath, and the role of Mao's wife, Jiang Qing. Scholars, diplomats, and survivors discuss the forced labor camps known as "Schools of May 7th"; the attacks on foreign consulates in Hong Kong and Beijing; China's support of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge; and the trial of the "Gang of Four." The program concludes with Deng Xiaoping opening China to the West.
Online
2005; 2003
3.

East and West: Pt. 1 [electronic resource]

Born into a prominent family in China, Soong Mei-ling was nonetheless thoroughly Western in thought and philosophy, having studied in America-one of the first Chinese women to do so. After marrying Chiang Kai-shek, the couple led a China embroiled in years of war and political intrigue. During World War II, she became the first Chinese national ever to address a joint session of the U.S. Congress and was counted as the fourth luminary of the Cairo Conference, alongside Roosevelt, Churchill, and her husband. This program tells the compelling story of Mme. Chiang up to the ousting of the Chinese Nationalist government.
Online
2006; 2003
4.

Exile Years: Pt. 2 [electronic resource]

After the Chinese Nationalist Government fled to Taiwan, Soong Mei-ling remained in the public eye as the distant and mysterious "Madame Chiang." She continued the role she had played during her years in mainland China, remaining prominent in foreign affairs and devoted to her work with women and charitable causes. This program examines the second half of Madame Chiang's life: her often-fractious relations with her stepson, President Chiang Ching-kuo; her efforts to safeguard the legacy of the Republic of China; and her relocation to the U.S., where she lived in seclusion until her death at the age of 106.
Online
2006; 2003
5.

Making Mao [electronic resource]

When the Communist Party took over China in 1949, it engineered a massive propaganda campaign to promote a worker's utopia and make Mao Zedong a god. This program examines the creation of the Mao-centered iconography that permeated the visual, performing, and popular arts as China struggled through its brutal metamorphosis into a modern nation. Artists relate the experience of being forced to work in the Soviet-inspired style that fueled the leader's popularity, as the video tracks Mao's image from revolutionary symbol to its appropriation for kitschy pop art.
Online
2009
6.

The Tiananmen Hostage [electronic resource]: Fang Lizhi

In early 1989, U.S.-China relations were at an all-time high-until the tragic Tiananmen Square demonstration, fomented, some say, by astrophysicist Fang Lizhi and his wife, Professor Li Shuxian. This program provides a play-by-play account of the events surrounding the massacre and Fang and Li's escape from China, in the words of former emissaries Brent Scowcroft and Larry Eagleburger-an account confirmed by then-Vice Foreign Minister Zhu Qizhen. Additional interviews with James Baker and numerous others who were on the scene shed light on the dubious triumph of diplomacy over democracy.
Online
2006; 1999
7.

Chinese Buddhist Temples [electronic resource]

Although they may not look exactly like their counterparts in China, North America's Chinese Buddhist temples are closely linked to them through symbolism and traditions that go back more than 1,500 years. This video looks at structural symmetry, north/south building orientation, and interior layout; architectural elements like pagodas, columns, and courtyards; the lotus flower as a design element; and the statues of Buddha and the temple guardians. Buddhism's origin in India, the Siddhartha/Buddha story, and aspects of Buddhist worship are introduced as well.
Online
2006; 2005
8.

1893-1945 [electronic resource]: Against the Tide-Mao's Early Years

Part one of the series China: Through Mao's Eyes describes Mao Zedong's youth, his formative adulthood, and his consolidation of power. Archival photographs from Mao's childhood and education, film clips from his campaigns against foreign invaders and Chinese nationalists, and lavish, government-produced reconstructions of the Long March detail the drama of those decades. Film excerpts featuring Jiang Qing, the actress who became Mao's fifth wife and a feared political force, highlight the Chairman's unpredictable life choices. Based on Philip Short's definitive biography Mao: A Life.
Online
2006; 2005
9.

1958-1969 [electronic resource]: Not a Dinner Party-the Cultural Revolution

Part three of the series China: Through Mao's Eyes examines the origins of the Cultural Revolution, Mao's orchestration of it, the political and economic shockwaves it created, and its human cost. Rarely seen archival footage of young Red Guard operatives raiding and ransacking a home-combined with present-day interviews featuring former Red Guards and their victims-create an in-depth portrayal of the tumultuous period. One commentator links the Cultural Revolution with the entrepreneurial freedom that China's government now fosters. Based on Philip Short's definitive biography Mao: A Life.
Online
2006; 2005
10.

1970 and Beyond [electronic resource]: Mao Is Not Dead

Part four of the series China: Through Mao's Eyes details the watershed Nixon-Mao diplomacy, Mao's death and its aftermath, and the legacy of his rule and philosophy. Scenes showing an aged and infirm Mao meeting with foreign emissaries and CPC assemblies reveal his determination to shape policy and preserve his imposing image as long as possible. Today's citizens who look back nostalgically on Mao's reign are contrasted with a young, materialistic, sexually uninhibited generation-although the program makes clear that the Chairman still inspires awe and reverence throughout Chinese society. Based on Philip Short's definitive biography Mao: A Life.
Online
2006; 2005
11.

Tearing Down the Wall [electronic resource]: Decline of Socialism

Did the Soviet Union collapse under external pressure or its own weight? What enabled free market forces to assert themselves in China? Is socialism dead, or has it simply evolved? This program addresses these and other questions, focusing on the political, cultural, and economic factors behind the fall of the iron curtain regimes. Outlining the Cultural Revolution and its consequences, the emergence of the Reagan and Thatcher administrations, and the backfiring of the Soviet coup in 1991, the program demonstrates in detail how governments across the world abandoned socialism-some entirely, while others have maintained a tenuous facade.
Online
2007; 2005
12.

Journeys Into Islamic China [electronic resource]

In addition to trade goods, religious beliefs also followed the ancient Silk Road into China. Today, a vibrant minority of more than 20 million Chinese Muslims of various ethnic groups live harmoniously among an overall population of more than a billion. This program traces the history of Islam in China while illustrating the Muslim way of life there, including prayer, religious education, and cultural activities.
Online
2006; 2004
13.

Ancient Chinese Sports [electronic resource]: Window on Chinese History and Culture

Where was golf invented? And soccer? And polo? Research has revealed that the answer to all three questions is China. In this program, these and other sports-archery, acrobatics, the martial art wushu, dragon boat racing, and 15-pole ball, a form of bowling-are each set securely within the contexts of Chinese history and culture as authentic reenactments bring these ancient games (and some of the gory circumstances associated with them) back to life. Commentary by Chinese sports expert Cui Le Quan, Chinese archery scholar Stephen Selby, renowned wushu master Wu Bin, and others is featured.
Online
2009; 2007
14.

A Leaf Blown on the Winds of History Part 1 [electronic resource]: China's Last Emperor

Groomed for power by the Dowager Empress, three-year-old Aisin-Gioro Puyi ascended China's imperial throne in 1908. This program illustrates the early years of his sporadic reign, his education under Scottish tutor Reginald Johnston, and the shifting of his political fortunes at the mercy of international events. Puyi's eviction from the Forbidden City during his teenage years, his Westernized playboy lifestyle, and his manifold marriages and liaisons all come to life through rarely seen archival footage, eyewitness interviews, and Puyi's own writings. The episode concludes at the height of the Japanese occupation, during which Puyi lost all semblance of authority and became a puppet ruler.
Online
2009; 2008
15.

Long Journey Into a Red Sunset Part 2 [electronic resource]: China's Last Emperor

August 16, 1945: the end of World War II and the capture of Aisin-Gioro Puyi, Manchukuo's Japanese-controlled regent, by the Soviet Army. This program depicts what befell the former Chinese emperor during his captivity in Russia, his eventual extradition to Communist China, and his troubled life under Mao's regime. Through archival footage, detailed interviews, and excerpts from Puyi's autobiography, the film explores his testimony at an International Military Tribunal, his nine-year detention at a reeducation camp, his eventual pardon by China's Supreme Court, and his return to a quiet life in Beijing-darkened once more by the Cultural Revolution.
Online
2009; 2008
16.

The Yangtze River [electronic resource]: China's Wild Lifeline

Among the most utilized waterways in the world, the Yangtze River is also one of the most volatile. This program sheds light on humanity's battle to tame and profit from the river-specifically, a project initiated by Chiang Kai-shek in the 1930s. The program also studies corresponding ecological problems. Viewers are introduced to the Three Gorges Dam, a concrete mega-structure visible from space, which has created huge economic benefits but also displaced thousands from their homes and irrevocably altered silt flow, geological formations, and fish stock levels. Citizens who have relocated and adapted offer commentary, along with scientists and engineers familiar with "China's New Great Wall.
Online
2009; 2008
17.

The Unwinking Gaze [electronic resource]: Inside Story of Dalai Lama's Struggle for Tibet

Filmed over the course of three years, this documentary offers viewers unprecedented access to His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his inner circle as they work together to convince the Chinese government of the need for a negotiated settlement on the future of Tibet. The result is a truly unique portrait of a widely revered world leader as he struggles to strike a balance between his spiritual beliefs and the realpolitik required to draw an extremely reluctant China into discussion. The Unwinking Gaze is not three years in the life of the Dalai Lama; it is his life's work condensed into three years.
Online
2009; 2008
18.

Opening the Door [electronic resource]: How Deng Xiaoping Transformed China's Economy

Given the vitality of China's economy today, it is difficult to imagine that Deng Xiaoping's early reforms met any resistance-but they did. This program examines Deng's transformation from a Maoist functionary into the leader who broke from pure Communism and, despite the highest of stakes, reinvented his country. Helping viewers understand Deng's creation of China's Special Economic Zones, the film features commentary from Chinese journalists and political insiders-as well as from Zbigniew Brzezinski, National Security Advisor in the Carter administration, and Sidney Rittenberg, an American expatriate in China during the Mao and Deng years.
Online
2009; 2008
19.

Becoming a Superpower [electronic resource]: Deng Xiaoping's Reforms and Their Legacy

What forces drove Chinese capitalism forward and enabled a generation of innovators and business leaders to emerge? Can the tragedy of Tiananmen Square be understood in terms of China's economic, rather than political, development? What is Deng Xiaoping's legacy today? This program addresses those questions as it explores the maturation and impact of Deng's policies. Interviewees include Chen Yizi, a former government economic adviser; Wan Runnan, founder of Sitong Electronics-which, like many other Chinese companies, flourished under Deng's reforms; Dr. Michael Marti, author of China and the Legacy of Deng Xiaoping: From Communist Revolution to Capitalist Evolution; and many others.
Online
2009; 2008
20.

Fine Rain [electronic resource]: Politics and Folk Songs in China

Whether they were crafted to spread Mao's message of class struggle or spun from the fabric of everyday life, Chinese folk songs carry with them immense historical and cultural importance. This program examines a wide range of songs and melodies from the country's pre-Communist era to the Cultural Revolution, energized by a rich progression of archival footage, photographs, interviews, and present-day renditions sung in homes and on street corners. The origins, meanings, and political impact of several well-known songs are described, along with an illustration of jianpu, the traditional Chinese system of musical notation, and the distinction between haozi, or workmen's songs, and the urban style known as xiaodiao.
Online
2008; 2007