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1.

Human Migrations [electronic resource]

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Based on recent studies in archaeology and linguistics, explores how and why early humans moved across Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas. Concludes with Jerry H. Bentley's thoughts on the ever-evolving nature of our understanding of world history through the example of the Urumchi mummies of Western China.
Online
2004
2.

Order and Early Societies [electronic resource]

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Through the rise of the Chinese empire, Mayan regional kingdoms, and the complex society of Igbo Ukwu, this unit considers the origins of centralized bureaucratic empires, regional kingdoms and a decentralized way or ordering society. Linda Walton discusses the rise of gender inequality through the example of the Neolithic Hongshan culture of northeastern China, whose archeological sites contain remarkable evidence of important female imagery.
Online
2004
3.

Early Economies [electronic resource]

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A comparison of manorial economies in Japan and medieval Europe is contrasted with the tribute economy of the Incas. The experience of dramatic economic change is illustrated by the commercial revolution in China. Concludes with Peter Winn discussing the economic effects of landholding by religious institutions.
Online
2004
4.

Early Global Commodities [electronic resource]

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Explains that global trade was established by China's demand for silver and Spain's newly discovered mines in the America and that common currencies before that time were silver, gold, copper and shells. Candice Goucher talks about the reasons behind the continued use of regional currencies such as shells and beads even after the global spread of metals.
Online
2004
5.

Food, Demographics and Culture [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates how studying the production and consumption of food allows historians to uncover hidden levels of meaning in social relationships, understand demographic shifts, and trace cultural exchange. Examines the earliest impact of globalization including changing cuisine, environmental impacts, and the rise of forced labor as a global economic force. Candice Goucher discusses the fear that consumption of exotic and genetically modified foods disrupts the order of nature.
Online
2004
6.

Imperial Designs [electronic resource]

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Examines the profound consequences of Imperalism in the South African frontier, Brazil, China and Japan, where politics, culture, industrial capitalism, and the environment were shaped and re-shaped. Historian Patrick Manning discusses the relationship between the concept of empire and powerful, multinational corporations.
Online
2004
7.

People Shape the World [electronic resource]

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Examines the role of individual and collective action in shaping the world through the lives of such diverse figures as Mao Zedong, the Ayatollah Khomeini, and Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo. Historian Susan Glosser uses the example of Mao Zedong to show how shifting perspectives on the past affect the way historical figures are remembered
Online
2004
8.

Global Forces/Local Impact [electronic resource]

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A case study focuses on globalization's impact on the booming Chinese economy and the population that drives it. Students analyze economic data to understand the disparity in the quality of life in Southeast Asia. The second case study examines the conflict between Native Americans and farmers over water usage in Oregon. Students perform field research to determine how human activities affect the quality and availability of water resources.
Online
2002
9.

China Through Mapping [electronic resource]

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In Mimi Norton's Second Grade classroom at Solano Elementary School in Phoenix, students learn about China's position on the globe and the location of important landmarks within the country. As a class, students create a giant map of China on the floor. Working in teams, they complete mapping tasks at classroom stations, focusing on the five themes of geography. As a culminating activity, students solve an interactive detective mystery created by Ms. Norton and work in small groups to solve problems based on their mastery of the map of China.
Online
2003