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1.

Discovering Buddhism

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This thirteen-part teaching series touches on all the vital points of Tibetan Buddhism as presented in the Gelug lineage of the Dalai Lama's traction" -- container.
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Chinese Traditional Painting

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"Chinese traditional painting expresses the essence of Chinese culture. Using brush-pens, ink, paper, and ink-stones as tools, traditional painting has its own unique system for portraits, landscapes, flowers, birds, and other animals. This episode follows the trail of influential artists. It also describes the spiritual framework that developed Chinese traditional painting by examining their works, techniques, and individual life experiences."--Publisher's website.
DVD
2003
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

China Land of Archeology

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"China's long history has provided countless fascinating archeological findings in many facets of this science. Some of the most riveting and important are Bronze Age drawings of the Shang Dynasty, stone writing tablets of the Han Dynasty, the matriarchal agrarian village of Bampo, and, the burial complex at Xi'an--home to more than seven thousand terra cotta warriors, horses and chariots still being excavated three decades after its discovery."--Container.
DVD
1999
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Ancient China: A Journey Back in Time

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Using superb 3D graphics, this program highlights China's architectural achievements including The Great Wall of China, the terracotta army of the First Chinese Emperor, a Chinese village from seven thousand years ago and Beijing's Forbidden City.
DVD
2000
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

Democracy in China [electronic resource]: Billion Small Voices

In China, where approximately 80 percent of the population is rural, the impact of democratic village elections could reshape the future of the nation. Although some Chinese are skeptical, many believe that establishing democracy at the local level will pave the way for a democratic national government. This program focuses on the efforts of The Carter Center to support China's initiative by inviting Chinese delegates to observe U.S. primaries and by sending emissaries to China to assist in the mechanics of gathering and tabulating votes. In its post-Mao effort to catch up economically with other nations, China is opening the door to Western ways and attempting to take its place in the growing Global Village.
Online
2006; 1998
6.

Ancient Treasures [electronic resource]: Imperial Art of China

Art appreciation requires an understanding of the medium, the subject matter, and the subtexts inherent in the artists' techniques. In this program, correspondent Paul Solman and art historian Wen Fong visit an exhibit that is emblematic of Imperial China from the 8th century to the 17th. Styles discussed include the Imperial "propaganda" of the Sung and Ming dynasties; the wild spontaneity of Qwai Su's calligraphy, akin to the action painting method of Jackson Pollock; the intensely personal works of Ni-Tsung; the bourgeois images of Chu Ying; and the subtly subversive imagery of Chu Ta, a prince who became a monk. To Wen Fong, art is the perfect bridge between cultures because everyone can respond to its mystical essence. All one needs to do is look deeply.
Online
2005; 1998
7.

Chinese Art [electronic resource]: Treasures of the National Palace Museum

This program spotlights 33 works of Chinese art seldom ever seen outside of the National Palace Museum. Spanning approximately 5,000 years of history, this diverse collection of pieces includes a Neolithic pottery jar; bronze fangzun and fangyi vessels from the late Shang-early Zhou period; a bronze ding vessel from the Late Western Zhou period; a Tang figurine in sancai glaze; a Ming cup in doucai enamels; and a Qing cylindrical curio cabinet. Displayed in chronological order and shown from numerous angles, these cultural artifacts comprise an indispensable educational resource for art history and Asian studies curriculums. Access points, provided in index form, make locating each artifact easy.
Online
2005; 1999
8.

China [electronic resource]: Dance Around Golden Calf

As China continues to experiment with Western-style economics, many city dwellers already enjoy the prerogatives of a market economy. But how will China feed itself as more and more farmers flee their land for the allure of urban living? This program seeks to understand the effects of economic reform on Chinese society, from the villages to the cities. Will cultural values and the traditional arts and sciences retain their importance as China makes its bid for first-world status, or will they and the rest of the old China be swept away by Western attitudes, a burgeoning middle-class, and the country's new identity as a nascent economic powerhouse?
Online
2006; 1997
9.

The New Leap Forward [electronic resource]: Chinese Communist Party in 21st Century

Thanks to reforms first enacted by Jiang Zemin and others, Chinese communism has adopted some remarkably capitalistic ideologies. This landmark program documents the transformation of the Chinese Communist Party as, in its efforts to advance the nation's manufacturing power and extend the benefits of Party membership, it inducts a previously banned member segment: private entrepreneurs. But can the new Communist Party still be called Marxist?
Online
2006; 2003
10.

Hutong [electronic resource]: Alleyways of Change in Contemporary Beijing

As Beijing prepares for the 2008 Olympics, most of the hutong-the city's small traditional dwellings and the network of lanes and alleys formed by them-are being demolished to make room for skyscrapers. This program explores social and cultural changes in historical Beijing, as seen in the life of a few ordinary citizens who still live in the hutong. The program includes computer models of the designing of ancient Beijing City.
Online
2006; 2002
11.

No Rest for the Weary [electronic resource]: Cultural Revolution and Its Origins

From World War II until Mao's death in 1976, the Chinese faced recurring hardships, the Cultural Revolution perhaps the most damaging to their traditional society. This program carefully traces the origins and implementation of Mao's agenda of social upheaval, bringing together documentary footage and firsthand accounts from those who experienced it. Among those interviewed is Song Yongyi, a history professor at Dickinson College who left China in order to write an account of the movement.
Online
2005; 2003
12.

The Unfortunate Generation [electronic resource]: Cultural Revolution and Beyond

Within two years of the Cultural Revolution, armed factions battled each other in Mao's name. To avoid civil war, Mao essentially banished his zealots to the countryside. This program chronicles the Cultural Revolution, its disastrous aftermath, and the role of Mao's wife, Jiang Qing. Scholars, diplomats, and survivors discuss the forced labor camps known as "Schools of May 7th"; the attacks on foreign consulates in Hong Kong and Beijing; China's support of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge; and the trial of the "Gang of Four." The program concludes with Deng Xiaoping opening China to the West.
Online
2005; 2003
13.

East and West: Pt. 1 [electronic resource]

Born into a prominent family in China, Soong Mei-ling was nonetheless thoroughly Western in thought and philosophy, having studied in America-one of the first Chinese women to do so. After marrying Chiang Kai-shek, the couple led a China embroiled in years of war and political intrigue. During World War II, she became the first Chinese national ever to address a joint session of the U.S. Congress and was counted as the fourth luminary of the Cairo Conference, alongside Roosevelt, Churchill, and her husband. This program tells the compelling story of Mme. Chiang up to the ousting of the Chinese Nationalist government.
Online
2006; 2003
14.

Exile Years: Pt. 2 [electronic resource]

After the Chinese Nationalist Government fled to Taiwan, Soong Mei-ling remained in the public eye as the distant and mysterious "Madame Chiang." She continued the role she had played during her years in mainland China, remaining prominent in foreign affairs and devoted to her work with women and charitable causes. This program examines the second half of Madame Chiang's life: her often-fractious relations with her stepson, President Chiang Ching-kuo; her efforts to safeguard the legacy of the Republic of China; and her relocation to the U.S., where she lived in seclusion until her death at the age of 106.
Online
2006; 2003
15.

Beijing Opera Masks [electronic resource]: Face of Chinese Tradition

This program enters the world of Beijing opera through the traditional art of mask-making-and through the eyes of 76-year-old Xiang Qi Shang, a celebrated mask maker who has devoted his life to preserving a custom that may yet be lost in China's rush to modernization. Master Xiang demonstrates his remarkable brushwork as he comments on a range of topics, including the use of facial expression to illuminate a character's personality and the application of symbolic colors to aid in audience recognition. Facial painting in Beijing opera is also discussed.
Online
2006; 2002
16.

Chinese Paper-Cutting [electronic resource]: Art of Good Fortune

Perennially popular in China, paper-cutting is treasured for its ability to transform ordinary paper into intricately patterned, brilliantly colored works of art. This program, filmed in Hubei Province, charts the evolution of Chinese paper-cutting from traditional cutouts representing luck and health to modern visual art as it illustrates the designing, cutting, and coloring processes. Tsuwoo Wi, whose father was the only apprentice of the great Master Wang Lao Shang, is featured, along with Tsuwoo Tsuing, of Central Art College, Beijing.
Online
2006; 2002
17.

Eight Million Gods [electronic resource]: Japanese Matsuri Festival

This program examines the Japanese matsuri or "summer festival," perhaps the best elucidation of that country's ancient polytheism. Ceremony footage from Tokyo and surrounding areas illustrates various festival activities and explores the Japanese cultural emphasis on community, cooperation, and folk worship. Commentary by Japanese cultural scholar Yoshi Morikatsu, interviews with festival participants, and astonishing crowd scenes of matsuri processions make clear that Japan derives a strong sense of unity from these communal celebratory rituals.
Online
2006; 2002
18.

Spirits of the State [electronic resource]: Japan's Yasukuni Shrine

Tokyo's Yasukuni shrine honors and venerates the spirits of Japanese soldiers and officers-including convicted and executed war criminals. This program explores the history of the Shinto shrine, the complexity of its functions, and the controversies generated when political leaders appear there. Interviews with visitors, an inside look at the shrine's adjacent museum of war memorabilia, and a discussion of what has become known as "state Shinto" create a context in which reverence for the enshrined may be understood. A rare view of Japanese nationalism and the political use of religious traditions, Spirits of the State offers valuable insight into the continuing and contested legacies of World War II.
Online
2006; 2004
19.

From Somewhere to Nowhere [electronic resource]: China's Internal Migrant Workers

High-density population centers of enormous size are springing up in China with dizzying speed, and with them comes an increased demand for migrant workers in construction, manufacturing, and mining. Through still images by Andreas Seibert and documentary footage by Villi Hermann, this program travels throughout China to vividly capture the experiences of these mingong, tens of millions on the move from the countryside to the cities in the too-often misplaced hope of building a better life for themselves and their families. An intriguing angle on urbanization fueled by explosive economic growth-and a moving composite portrait of laborers who typically toil in obscurity.
Online
2010; 2009
20.

Mongolia [electronic resource]: Wrestling With Change

Close to the Russian border, far removed from Mongolia's polluted and overcrowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar, an ancient herding culture fights to maintain its identity-and its survival. This program examines the nomadic communities of the Mongolian plains and their resistance to change, despite growing pressure on many herders to modernize and migrate to urban areas. Viewers meet some who hold fast to the old ways and some who have already moved to the city, even though they long for the open landscape and acknowledge that "a Mongolian without a horse is like a bird without wings." Scholar Tsedev Dojoo further explores the impact of Mongolia's new emphasis on commercial agriculture, mineral extraction, and other industries.
Online
2010; 2009