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1.

Nubia [electronic resource]

Once rivals and even rulers of Ancient Egypt, Nubian kingdoms dominated the eastern Sahara for millennia. In this program art historian Gus Casely-Hayford tours the ruins of Kerma and Meroe, two of Nubia's great capitals, to examine some of the cultural treasures these complex civilizations left behind: the remains of a vast worship center built 4,000 years ago, a temple to the god Amun, statues of the black pharaohs who founded Egypt's 25th Dynasty, and the spectacular group of more than 200 pyramids spread around the holy mountain of Jabel Barkal. Casely-Hayford also views a Neolithic rock art site, chants with mystics at a Sufi shrine, and visits Sudanese artisans to tell the story of a heritage that has stretched from prehistory to the modern day.
Online
2011; 2009
2.

Sudan in Crisis [electronic resource]

The hostilities ripping apart the Sudanese region of Darfur have created a humanitarian crisis which the international community is only beginning to address. This ABC News program serves as a starting point for analyzing the situation, shedding light on how the conflict spiraled out of control and led to the deaths of thousands and the displacement of far more. Focusing on the efforts of relief organizations to shelter, feed, and care for a tidal wave of refugees-and the political, logistical, and geographic obstacles that have made such efforts nearly impossible-the video assesses the accuracy of the term "genocide" in describing the conflict's ethnically driven atrocities.
Online
2006; 2004
3.

Journeys Into Islamic Africa [electronic resource]

Geographically, Muslim countries cover approximately 50 percent of Africa. This program travels around the continent to inquire into Islamic history and the Muslim way of life, making stops in Ethiopia, Tanzania, Zanzibar, South Africa, Senegal, Algeria, Sudan, and many other destinations. The experiences of two particular groups-those sent by Muhammad himself to Ethiopia, during the Muslim-Quraish War, and slaves and prisoners of the Dutch who were forcibly relocated to South Africa-are given special attention.
Online
2006; 2004
4.

The Nile River [electronic resource]: Shared or Monopolized?

Were it not for the elemental forces of the Nile River, the great architecture of ancient Egypt and Ethiopia might never have been built. But in today's water-starved world, the river could lead both countries down a destructive path. This program examines lives and livelihoods that depend on the Nile, from the humble to the hugely ambitious. In Egypt, viewers encounter a struggling Cairo fishing family, a father-and-son farming team, and the nation's irrigation minister, who discusses diverting part of the river into a new valley. Moving to the source of the Nile, the program depicts Ethiopia's efforts to exploit the river-a series of hydroelectric projects that have created tension with Egypt.
Online
2009; 2008
5.

Algeria 1954 [electronic resource]: Revolt of a Colony

This program shows the uprising which succeeded in throwing out the French from the point of view of an Algerian Arab, showing the conditions and following the thought processes and the steps that led to insurrection, and the revolt itself. The words are those of the colonized North Africans-the man in the street as well as the intellectual and politician-and of such radical theoreticians of revolt as Franz Fanon.
Online
2007; 1991
6.

Thebes, Egypt: The City of Amon

The capital of Egypt during the period of the Middle and New Kingdoms, Thebes was the city of the god Amon. With the temples and palaces at Karnak and Luxor and the necropolises of the Valley of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens, Thebes is a striking testimony to Egyptian civilization at its height.
Online
2017; 2000
7.

Fez, Morocco: Labyrinth and Paradise

Founded in th 9th century, Fez reached its height first in the 14th century under the Marinides and again in the 17th century. In 1912, when France established Rabat as the new capital, its political importance declined, but its religious and cultural role continues today, centered as it is around the two famous mosques of Al-Qarawiyin and Al-Andalus in the heart of the medina.
Online
2017; 1997
8.

The Cliff Temples of Abu Simbel, Egypt

This exceptional archaeological area is bordered by such magnificent monuments as the temples of Ramses II in Abu Simbel and the Sanctuary of Isis in Philae, which were saved from the Nile's rising waters thanks to an international campaign launched by UNESCO.
Online
2017; 2000
9.

What in the World—Algeria and Western Africa: Going Home

For forty years now the Sahrawi people have lived in exile. Their home: five refugee camps in one of the hottest parts of the desert where summer temperatures reach over 50 degrees centigrade. Having fled the Moroccan invasion of their homeland, Western Sahara, over 100,000 people now live in what is in effect an open prison where they are completely dependent on the World Food Programme for their survival. Yet they continue to dream of the prospect of returning to their homeland in northwest Africa. After years of frustration, armed conflict, and broken UN promises many of the young men are contemplating a return to war.
Online
2017; 2016
10.

Cairo’s Islamic Old City, Egypt

Tucked away amid the modern urban area of Cairo lies one of the world's oldest Islamic cities, with its famous mosques, madrasas, hammams, and fountains. Founded in the 10th century, it became the new center of the Islamic world, reaching its Golden Age in the 14th century.
Online
2017; 1996
11.

Ghadamès, Libya: The Underground Oasis

Built in an oasis, Ghadamès, "the pearl of the desert," is one of the oldest pre-Saharan cities and an outstanding example of a traditional settlement. Its domestic architecture is characterized by a vertical division of functions: the ground floor used to store supplies; then another floor for the family, overhanging covered alleys that create what is almost an underground network of passageways; and, at the top, open-air terraces reserved for the women.
Online
2017; 1999
12.

Morocco to Timbuktu: An Arabian Adventure—Episode 2

Alice Morrison treks across the Sahara via camelback. Her journey is halted by the closed border between Algeria and Morocco so she heads west on another trading route. She stops in Tamegroute, where she finds a hidden library of ancient books, before reaching Guelmim with its bustling livestock market. Border disputes halt Alice’s journey on the salt roads and she flies to Mali, Bamako where she visits the source of Timbuktu’s wealth. When she finally reaches the City of Gold, Alice relives its glorious past with a visit to its world-famous mosques, the last surviving treasures of a bygone era.
Online
2017
13.

St. Catherine's Cloister, Egypt

The Orthodox Monastery of St. Catherine stands at the foot of Mount Horeb where, the Old Testament records, Moses received the Tablets of the Law. The mountain is known and revered by Muslims as Jebel Musa. The entire area is sacred to three world religions: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. The Monastery, founded in the 6th century, is the oldest Christian monastery still in use for its initial function. Its walls and buildings are of great significance to studies of Byzantine architecture, and the Monastery houses outstanding collections of early Christian manuscripts and icons. The rugged mountainous landscape, containing numerous archaeological and religious sites and monuments, forms a perfect backdrop to the Monastery.
Online
2017; 2004
14.

Tunis's Old City, Tunisia: A Day in Ramadan

Under the Almohads and the Hafsids, from the 12th to the 16th centuries, Tunis was considered one of the greatest and wealthiest cities in the Islamic world. Some 700 monuments, including palaces, mosques, mausoleums, madrasas and fountains, testify to this remarkable past.
Online
2017; 2004
15.

The Pyramids of Giza and Memphis, Egypt

Extraordinary funerary monuments remain around the capital of the Old Kingdom of Egypt, including rock tombs, ornate mastabas, temples and pyramids. In ancient times, the site was considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World.
Online
2017; 2000
16.

Morocco to Timbuktu: An Arabian Adventure—Episode 1

Gold was in high demand in North Africa, and its source was the gold mines in sub-Saharan Africa, resulting long routes being forged across the desert. Alice Morrison hitches a ride in a crowded taxi of locals, Alice passes through the Islamic city of Fes, where she stays in a caravanserai; catches the Marrakech Express to the market town of Marrakech, where she learns to treat leather; treks in snow and storms across the mighty Atlas Mountains dotted with Berber villages; travels through valleys lined with casbahs; and enlists the help of Berbers to cross the Jbel Saghro Desert and reach the ancient city of Sijilmasa—once a great trading post and sanctuary for merchants arriving from Timbuktu.
Online
2017
17.

Marrakech, Morocco: Pearl of the South

Marrakesh, founded in 1071-1072, was the capital of the Almoravids and later the Almohades. The lively medina contains an impressive number of architectural masterpieces, including the walls and the monumental gates; the Kutubiya Mosque, with its 250-feet-high minaret; the Saadian tombs; and characteristic old houses.
Online
2017; 1997
18.

Kairouan, Tunisia: Sacred City of the Maghreb

Founded in 670, Kairouan flourished under the Aghlabide dynasty in the 9th century. Despite the transfer of the political capital to Tunis in the 12th century, Kairouan remained the first holy city of the Maghreb. Its rich architectural heritage includes the Great Mosque, with its columns in marble and porphyry, and the 9th-century Mosque of the Three Gates.
Online
2017; 2000