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Nervous System — Diseases
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1.

Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (Slipped Disk) [electronic resource]

The disks between the vertebrae are liable to displacement when put under strain. Heavy lifting may produce forces which cause a lumbar intervertebral disk to move out of place ("slipped disk").
Online
2004
2.

Athetosis Resulting From Basal Ganglia Injury [electronic resource]

Athetosis, or constant writhing movements, is often caused by injury to deeply situated structures within the brain called the basal ganglia.
Online
2004
3.

Alzheimer's Disease [electronic resource]

In a person with Alzheimer's disease, neurofibrillary tangles and plaques develop, causing both structural and chemical problems in the brain. Alzheimer's disease appears to disconnect areas of the brain that normally work together.
Online
2004
4.

Concussion [electronic resource]

In a severe impact to the head, the brain moves and hits the skull, causing injury. During a boxing match, the brain moves from side to side after the impact of a punch. Following a concussion head injury, confusion and disorientation due to temporary distortion of the brain may result.
Online
2004
5.

Parkinson's Disease [electronic resource]

In Parkinson's disease, dopamine production becomes irregular and inadequate and nerve cells cannot properly transmit messages. This results in the loss of muscle function. By providing an even, adequate supply of medication that the body converts into dopamine, neurons are able to transmit messages and tremors improve.
Online
2004
6.

Stroke [electronic resource]

A stroke may occur if an embolism travels from another part of the body and lodges within an artery in the brain. When an internal arterial wall becomes damaged, various types of emboli can form, such as one derived from platlets, thrombotic, cholesterol, or mixed. In this example, an embolism is formed in the internal carotid artery, breaks loose, travels towards the brain, and lodges in a cerebral artery. The blocked artery deprives the brain of oxygen, damaging the surrounding brain tissue. The result is a stroke.
Online
2004