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81.

The Trees Have a Mother [electronic resource]: Amazonian Cosmologies, Folktales, and Mystery

In spite of mounting ecological damage, the Amazon Basin continues to nurture age-old stories and beliefs. This documentary illustrates the importance of indigenous narratives to those who dwell near the city of Iquitos, Peru, and view their natural surroundings in mythical terms. Concerning a young man who has recently gone missing in the forest, the film depicts his mother's attempts to find him with the help of local shamans-resulting in various magical explanations for his disappearance and eventually producing a rich tapestry of tales and visions from all over the community.
Online
2009; 2008
82.

Flowers of Rwanda [electronic resource]: Making Peace With Genocide

Can killers and survivors coexist in peace? That is the crucial question facing Rwanda a dozen years after the genocide that claimed the lives of approximately 800,000 people-and the subject of this multi-award-winning documentary. Using interviews with Joseph Habineza, Minister of Education and Culture; Freddy Mutanguha, director of the Kigali Genocide Memorial Center; and numerous survivors, Flowers of Rwanda considers whether forgiveness and reconciliation can truly be achieved so the country can eradicate the ignorance and extremism that paved the way for monumental atrocity.
Online
2009; 2008
83.

Disengagement [electronic resource]: Israel's Unilateral Withdrawal

Israel's national unity was severely tested with the 2005 evacuation of settlers from the Gaza Strip and West Bank. This program tells the story of that watershed event through multiple perspectives and opinions. Opening with a historical overview of Israel's settlement policy, the program features compelling scenes from anti-disengagement demonstrations, the Gush Katif evacuation, Hamas rallies, Knesset sessions, and Palestinian Authority meetings. Interviews with key political players-including Israeli President Shimon Peres, former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and a number of Palestinian leaders-highlight the impact of Israel's unilateral move on the power structures that have dominated the conflict.
Online
2008; 2007
84.

To Love Oneself [electronic resource]: Grassroots Humanitarian Activities in Benin, Ethiopia, and Mali

Taking a grassroots approach to dealing with the physical and societal ills plaguing their countries, individuals and small groups in sub-Saharan Africa are creating success amidst widespread civil and economic instability. This program illustrates five empowering instances of solidarity and self-help: the Yeredeme project, run by single mothers in Mali; the Janjigui So association, for Malian women with improperly healed fistulas; the Fasil Circus, an entertainment troupe providing education and purpose for at-risk children in Ethiopia; the work of Adama "Kansaye" Diallo, a benefactor and mentor of street children in Mali; and the smuggling of black market gasoline into Benin-a valued service abetted by sympathetic mechanics and border guards that is a vital means of subsistence for [...]
Online
2008; 2004
85.

Who Controls Africa? [electronic resource]: Power Structures in Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, and Mali

Women form the backbone of sub-Saharan Africa and consistently exert some measure of control alongside men, whether it is as a local ruler, a witch, an activist, a wage earner, a laborer, or a caregiver. This program examines female, male, and mixed power structures, with a focus on the Bijagos Islands, where three queens and a king still rule autonomously even as the state government in Guinea-Bissau seeks to take control; Mali, where women ably run small businesses in a culture where both male-dominated democracy and male/female sorcery exist side by side; and Ghana, where all-male asafo companies-former military units that today are dedicated to social service-meet in rowing competitions for prestige and to honor their king.
Online
2008; 2004
86.

Growing Up in Africa [electronic resource]: Helping Children in Benin, Kenya, South Africa, and Uganda

Based on recent statistics, 90 percent of the world's orphans live in sub-Saharan Africa; 40 percent of African children work seven days a week; and many support themselves by prostitution or are subjected to enslavement. This program highlights the work of the Terre des Hommes Oasis Center, in Benin, which rescues, rehabilitates, and returns exploited children to their families; the Jinja School for Orphans, in Uganda; extended families on Kenya's Lamu Island, who educate and support the locale's many orphans; Barbara Petersen, who feeds and counsels street children in South Africa; and, also in South Africa, the Dance for All project, an initiative that brings dance to the poor areas of Cape Town.
Online
2008; 2004
87.

Dying in Africa [electronic resource]: Perspectives on the End of Life in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, and South Africa

In Africa-where infant mortality is sky-high, tens of millions have AIDS, and life expectancies can be as meager as 39 years-death is an all-too-frequent presence. This program presents sub-Saharan perspectives on the end of life: lavish Ghanaian funerals involving caskets shaped into whatever is most emblematic of the deceased; funeral rites of the Dogon, in Mali, where alcohol fermentation is attributed to the powers of the departed; the views of the Fulani of the Sahel, who do not believe in life after death; and the roles of the griot's tam-tam drum and fire kindled by a blacksmith's wife in the funeral rites of rural Burkina Faso. In addition, the good works of Sparrow Rainbow Village, in South Africa-the only residential facility in Africa established to meet the needs of termi [...]
Online
2008; 2004
88.

Miraculous Water [electronic resource]: Effects of Scarcity and Abundance in Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, and Mali

In sub-Saharan Africa, water is the focus of daily life. This program seeks to understand its centrality by investigating the situation at Lake Ganvie, Benin, an "African Venice" where survival is threatened by environmental changes, improper sanitation, and water-related illnesses; a perceived correlation among Dogon elders between their people's shift away from the worship of Nommo and an increase in drought conditions; the scarcity of and limited access to water in Ethiopia near the Sahel; annual mud-fishing in Mali, as malnourished locals, desperate to fill their stomachs, gather unhealthy fish in the sure knowledge that eating them will make them ill; and the worship of Mami Wata on the banks of the Volta River and the annual fetatotro, a turning-of-the-year festival.
Online
2008; 2004
89.

Paper Gods [electronic resource]: Aspects of Religion in Benin, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, and Mali

Christianity, Islam, and a broad range of indigenous religions coexist side by side in Africa, in many cases blending into unique hybrids. This program-an inquiry into the nature of the continent's spiritual practices-spotlights the Reverend Pastor Benoit D. Agbaossi, supreme head of the Celestial Church of Christ, in Benin, and footage of an exorcism and The Ceremony of the Infertile Woman; the village of Kukoe, Ghana, where women accused of witchcraft find welcome and sanctuary; the Rifai Sufis of Cairo, who provide insights into the meaning of Sufism; Yin believers of the Niger River, who venerate water spirits, and footage of the Holey Horey Ceremony; and a pilgrimage to the Sof Omar Cave, in Ethiopia, where a blend of Christianity, Islam, and animism is practiced.
Online
2008; 2004
90.

Will You Marry Me? [electronic resource]: Marriage Customs in Ethiopia, Mali, Niger, and Senegal

Even today, the majority of African women in both city and country still aspire to get a good husband and have many children. This program sheds light on the pros and cons of marriage customs in sub-Saharan Africa as it relates the story of an Ethiopian woman who fled her home in Harar as a teen to avoid an arranged marriage to an uncle; two happily wedded women of Mali who are wives in a polygamous marriage; the nomadic Wodaabe of Niger, a culture in which a man may have many wives, but among whom it is the bride-to-be who chooses the husband-to-be; and a Senegalese woman competing to become Miss Yongama, a contest of beauty and style-and a proven shortcut to finding a husband.
Online
2008; 2004
91.

The Talking Picture [electronic resource]: Impact of Mass Media in Kenya, Mali, South Africa, and Uganda

As Africa continues to modernize, the influence of the media in daily life is growing ever larger. This program examines the importance of the press, radio, the Internet, and TV via segments involving the Sowetan, a widely circulated South African newspaper that has its roots in the anti-apartheid struggle; KKC Kagadi, a rural community radio station in Uganda; Kenya-based Africa Online, an Internet service provider with a pan-African reach; and ORTM, the national broadcaster of Malian television. In the process, the program addresses racism, women's issues, grassroots entrepreneurship, access to online information, and the exploitation of street children-particularly twins.
Online
2009; 2004
92.

By Profession...an Artist [electronic resource]: Contemporary Art in Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, and South Africa

Historically, the arts in Africa were largely communal and unrecorded. But much has changed over the past century, and this program takes a look at art in sub-Saharan Africa as it exists today through profiles of Senegalese rap groups Alif and Wageble and the rap collective Fight and Forget, who use their music as a form of political activism; Senegalese sculptor Babacar Niang, whose workshop has trained artists who have found success in both the U.S. and Europe; Willie Bester, one of South Africa's most important resistance artists; Raymond Bogwana of Abakhaya, a world-touring crossover marimba band from South Africa; the cast and crew of Mother Courage, an AIDS documentary filmed in Burkina Faso and screened at the largest film festival in Africa; and Malian griot Fanta Diabate, ma [...]
Online
2009; 2004
93.

Sex in Africa [electronic resource]: Perspectives on Sex-Related Concerns in Ethiopia, Mali, and South Africa

In Africa, views on sex vary widely from conservative to liberal and from traditional to progressive. Topics covered in this program include gay rights, protected under the law only in post-apartheid South Africa; the practices of female genital excision and "dry sexual intercourse"-each described in detail-as they relate to severe female health issues and the violation of a woman's right to her own body; the practice of "dry sex" as it relates to the spread of HIV; and female prostitution as a means of subsistence-and, if a prostitute is fortunate enough to hook up with a wealthy foreigner, a chance for her and her family to escape poverty.
Online
2008; 2004
94.

White on Black [electronic resource]: Grappling With Race in Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mali, and South Africa

Speaking in broad sociocultural terms, the overall Western attitude toward Africans has been one of race-based condescension. This program addresses that historically conflicted relationship and ways in which it is changing in sub-Saharan Africa through the stories of an idealistic young French-born woman involved with the Yeredeme project, which supports and educates single mothers in Mali; a Chilean-born freelance photographer/TV cameraman who has filmed the war in Sudan and runs a modeling agency in Kenya; and a Portuguese family who moved to the Bijagos Islands to run a small hotel and restaurant there. The mixed expectations of the average tourist in Africa are also considered, along with the recently founded radical Afrikaner town of Orania-the proposed nucleus of a neo-aparthe [...]
Online
2008; 2004
95.

More Than Just a Game [electronic resource]: Competitions and Celebrations in Ethiopia, Ghana, Niger, Senegal, and Sudan

In sub-Saharan Africa, traditionally minded people view everything as being touched by the supernatural-including what might seem, to Western eyes, to be simply athletic or recreational activities. This program explains the deeper meaning of the donga, ritualized stick-fighting bouts of the Surma culture; sacred Senegalese wrestling, an ancient village tradition that has met with immense enthusiasm in the city; weekly wrestling matches in the Sudanese melting pot of Khartoum, rituals of cohesion rather than confrontation; Tuareg camel races, symbols of communal unity and strength; the plentiful music and dancing that accompanies African festivals; and soccer, which in Ghana involves the spells of sorcerers.
Online
2008; 2004
96.

Biometrics [electronic resource]

Technology is taking the field of biometrics to new levels of accuracy and efficiency. But is the price of such security, achieved by turning over unique bodily information to governments and private companies, too high? And is biometric data really as foolproof as its proponents say? This program travels the globe to showcase examples of high-tech biometrics in action, including electronic recognition of iris patterns, fingerprints, faces, hand vein patterns, handwriting, and gait. In addition, Alex Turk, chairman of France's national commission on data protection and civil liberties, voices his concern over people's passive acceptance of biometric technologies, and a hacker demonstrates just how easy it is to fake out a fingerprint scanner. Contains brief nudity depicting humans in [...]
Online
2008; 2007
97.

Design Battles [electronic resource]: Competition for Japan's Cell Phone Market

Almost any industry has its Holy Grail. For cell phone makers, it is a smaller, slimmer, and lighter model that sports a bigger screen and more functions-easy to envision, very difficult to make. This program examines the struggle for dominance in the Japanese cell phone market-a viable litmus test for worldwide technology consumption-and the internal battles tech companies endure in order to create hot products. Viewers are taken inside South Korea's LG Electronics as it tries to crack the market. In turn, Japan's NEC searches for a phone that will outdo LG's slimness, while Sony Ericsson workshops a design it hopes will endure. Meetings in which engineering and design teams go head-to-head illustrate the urgency and high stakes involved.
Online
2009; 2007
98.

The Steel King [electronic resource]: Lakshmi Mittal

Global conglomerate ArcelorMittal not only dominates the world steel market-it also serves as an eye-opening case study for those interested in corporate mergers and acquisitions. This program explores the history of the company and the career of its most prominent owner, Indian-born entrepreneur Lakshmi Mittal. Although Mittal himself avoids media attention, several company insiders and key industry players are interviewed in the program: Mittal Steel director and former ISG owner Wilbur Ross, Arcelor CEO Guy Dolle, Nippon Steel CEO Akio Mimura, Posco CEO Ku-Tack Lee, and Goldman Sachs executive Yoel Zaoui. Mittal's controversial 2006 hostile takeover of Arcelor is examined in detail.
Online
2009; 2007
99.

Inside a Shari'ah Court [electronic resource]

Some democratic governments have considered allowing Muslim communities to conduct their own courts of law, or Shari'ah courts. Westerners who oppose such measures cite reports of amputation and stoning wherever Shari'ah has taken hold. This program travels to Nigeria, where Shari'ah law functions alongside the secular court system. Spotlighting an outspoken judge determined to convey the benefits of Islamic law, the film presents cases, verdicts, and sentences that clearly illustrate ways in which Shari'ah is implemented. Although the attitudes of local women toward the court may surprise some viewers, the film pulls no punches in its examination of the precarious rights of women under Shari'ah.
Online
2008; 2007
100.

Slaves of the Sword [electronic resource]: Moshe Dayan

From his childhood on a kibbutz through his contentious military career, this program presents a biographical sketch of Moshe Dayan. Complex and charismatic, Dayan became a hero and international icon with his aggressive approach to the issue of Palestine - but fell from grace after the Yom Kippur War. Archival footage gives viewers a vivid look at the Middle Eastern conflict in the early 20th century, while statesmen, historians, and family members provide commentary on the man who once symbolized the might of the new Israel.
Online
2003