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81.

Will You Marry Me? [electronic resource]: Marriage Customs in Ethiopia, Mali, Niger, and Senegal

Even today, the majority of African women in both city and country still aspire to get a good husband and have many children. This program sheds light on the pros and cons of marriage customs in sub-Saharan Africa as it relates the story of an Ethiopian woman who fled her home in Harar as a teen to avoid an arranged marriage to an uncle; two happily wedded women of Mali who are wives in a polygamous marriage; the nomadic Wodaabe of Niger, a culture in which a man may have many wives, but among whom it is the bride-to-be who chooses the husband-to-be; and a Senegalese woman competing to become Miss Yongama, a contest of beauty and style-and a proven shortcut to finding a husband.
Online
2008; 2004
82.

The Talking Picture [electronic resource]: Impact of Mass Media in Kenya, Mali, South Africa, and Uganda

As Africa continues to modernize, the influence of the media in daily life is growing ever larger. This program examines the importance of the press, radio, the Internet, and TV via segments involving the Sowetan, a widely circulated South African newspaper that has its roots in the anti-apartheid struggle; KKC Kagadi, a rural community radio station in Uganda; Kenya-based Africa Online, an Internet service provider with a pan-African reach; and ORTM, the national broadcaster of Malian television. In the process, the program addresses racism, women's issues, grassroots entrepreneurship, access to online information, and the exploitation of street children-particularly twins.
Online
2009; 2004
83.

By Profession...an Artist [electronic resource]: Contemporary Art in Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, and South Africa

Historically, the arts in Africa were largely communal and unrecorded. But much has changed over the past century, and this program takes a look at art in sub-Saharan Africa as it exists today through profiles of Senegalese rap groups Alif and Wageble and the rap collective Fight and Forget, who use their music as a form of political activism; Senegalese sculptor Babacar Niang, whose workshop has trained artists who have found success in both the U.S. and Europe; Willie Bester, one of South Africa's most important resistance artists; Raymond Bogwana of Abakhaya, a world-touring crossover marimba band from South Africa; the cast and crew of Mother Courage, an AIDS documentary filmed in Burkina Faso and screened at the largest film festival in Africa; and Malian griot Fanta Diabate, ma [...]
Online
2009; 2004
84.

Sex in Africa [electronic resource]: Perspectives on Sex-Related Concerns in Ethiopia, Mali, and South Africa

In Africa, views on sex vary widely from conservative to liberal and from traditional to progressive. Topics covered in this program include gay rights, protected under the law only in post-apartheid South Africa; the practices of female genital excision and "dry sexual intercourse"-each described in detail-as they relate to severe female health issues and the violation of a woman's right to her own body; the practice of "dry sex" as it relates to the spread of HIV; and female prostitution as a means of subsistence-and, if a prostitute is fortunate enough to hook up with a wealthy foreigner, a chance for her and her family to escape poverty.
Online
2008; 2004
85.

White on Black [electronic resource]: Grappling With Race in Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mali, and South Africa

Speaking in broad sociocultural terms, the overall Western attitude toward Africans has been one of race-based condescension. This program addresses that historically conflicted relationship and ways in which it is changing in sub-Saharan Africa through the stories of an idealistic young French-born woman involved with the Yeredeme project, which supports and educates single mothers in Mali; a Chilean-born freelance photographer/TV cameraman who has filmed the war in Sudan and runs a modeling agency in Kenya; and a Portuguese family who moved to the Bijagos Islands to run a small hotel and restaurant there. The mixed expectations of the average tourist in Africa are also considered, along with the recently founded radical Afrikaner town of Orania-the proposed nucleus of a neo-aparthe [...]
Online
2008; 2004
86.

More Than Just a Game [electronic resource]: Competitions and Celebrations in Ethiopia, Ghana, Niger, Senegal, and Sudan

In sub-Saharan Africa, traditionally minded people view everything as being touched by the supernatural-including what might seem, to Western eyes, to be simply athletic or recreational activities. This program explains the deeper meaning of the donga, ritualized stick-fighting bouts of the Surma culture; sacred Senegalese wrestling, an ancient village tradition that has met with immense enthusiasm in the city; weekly wrestling matches in the Sudanese melting pot of Khartoum, rituals of cohesion rather than confrontation; Tuareg camel races, symbols of communal unity and strength; the plentiful music and dancing that accompanies African festivals; and soccer, which in Ghana involves the spells of sorcerers.
Online
2008; 2004
87.

Biometrics [electronic resource]

Technology is taking the field of biometrics to new levels of accuracy and efficiency. But is the price of such security, achieved by turning over unique bodily information to governments and private companies, too high? And is biometric data really as foolproof as its proponents say? This program travels the globe to showcase examples of high-tech biometrics in action, including electronic recognition of iris patterns, fingerprints, faces, hand vein patterns, handwriting, and gait. In addition, Alex Turk, chairman of France's national commission on data protection and civil liberties, voices his concern over people's passive acceptance of biometric technologies, and a hacker demonstrates just how easy it is to fake out a fingerprint scanner. Contains brief nudity depicting humans in [...]
Online
2008; 2007
88.

Design Battles [electronic resource]: Competition for Japan's Cell Phone Market

Almost any industry has its Holy Grail. For cell phone makers, it is a smaller, slimmer, and lighter model that sports a bigger screen and more functions-easy to envision, very difficult to make. This program examines the struggle for dominance in the Japanese cell phone market-a viable litmus test for worldwide technology consumption-and the internal battles tech companies endure in order to create hot products. Viewers are taken inside South Korea's LG Electronics as it tries to crack the market. In turn, Japan's NEC searches for a phone that will outdo LG's slimness, while Sony Ericsson workshops a design it hopes will endure. Meetings in which engineering and design teams go head-to-head illustrate the urgency and high stakes involved.
Online
2009; 2007
89.

The Steel King [electronic resource]: Lakshmi Mittal

Global conglomerate ArcelorMittal not only dominates the world steel market-it also serves as an eye-opening case study for those interested in corporate mergers and acquisitions. This program explores the history of the company and the career of its most prominent owner, Indian-born entrepreneur Lakshmi Mittal. Although Mittal himself avoids media attention, several company insiders and key industry players are interviewed in the program: Mittal Steel director and former ISG owner Wilbur Ross, Arcelor CEO Guy Dolle, Nippon Steel CEO Akio Mimura, Posco CEO Ku-Tack Lee, and Goldman Sachs executive Yoel Zaoui. Mittal's controversial 2006 hostile takeover of Arcelor is examined in detail.
Online
2009; 2007
90.

Inside a Shari'ah Court [electronic resource]

Some democratic governments have considered allowing Muslim communities to conduct their own courts of law, or Shari'ah courts. Westerners who oppose such measures cite reports of amputation and stoning wherever Shari'ah has taken hold. This program travels to Nigeria, where Shari'ah law functions alongside the secular court system. Spotlighting an outspoken judge determined to convey the benefits of Islamic law, the film presents cases, verdicts, and sentences that clearly illustrate ways in which Shari'ah is implemented. Although the attitudes of local women toward the court may surprise some viewers, the film pulls no punches in its examination of the precarious rights of women under Shari'ah.
Online
2008; 2007
91.

Slaves of the Sword [electronic resource]: Moshe Dayan

From his childhood on a kibbutz through his contentious military career, this program presents a biographical sketch of Moshe Dayan. Complex and charismatic, Dayan became a hero and international icon with his aggressive approach to the issue of Palestine - but fell from grace after the Yom Kippur War. Archival footage gives viewers a vivid look at the Middle Eastern conflict in the early 20th century, while statesmen, historians, and family members provide commentary on the man who once symbolized the might of the new Israel.
Online
2003
92.

Slaves of the Sword [electronic resource]: Yitzhak Rabin

Yitzhak Rabin called himself "a solider in the army of peace," distancing himself from the uncompromising policies of David ben-Gurion and Moshe Dayan. As prime minister he opposed the illegal Israeli settlement of land occupied by Palestinians - but he also underestimated the frustration of the Arabs who had been living as refugees for so long. This program chronicles Rabin's political career, his efforts to negotiate peace, and his assassination following the Oslo Accords. Henry Kissinger, Shimon Peres, and others who were close to Rabin share historical insights.
Online
2003
93.

Albert Camus, Journalist [electronic resource]

Far from embracing the existentialism he is often associated with, Albert Camus was a social activist and staunch believer in the positive potential of the human race. In this program excerpts from private film archives and a variety of interviews document Camus' career as a journalist concerned with social justice. From his early years in Algeria writing about poverty and oppression to the underground newspaper he edited for the French Resistance, the video reveals how Camus' journalism informed the themes and style of The Stranger, The Plague, and The Myth of Sisyphus.
Online
2010
94.

The President [electronic resource]: Seeking the European Union's First Head of State

In 2001, with ten more member states about to join the European Union, the E.U. was looking for symbolic unity and a stronger presence on the world stage. The E.U. had been led by a series of officers each serving for a scant six months, and many felt the time was right for a long-term chief-thus launching a massive power play as heads of state jockeyed to shoehorn national interest in with political compromise. This program goes behind the scenes of the historic eight-year struggle to choose a first-ever E.U. president, an effort that fell somewhat short of the mark. On-location footage captures Tony Blair, Silvio Berlusconi, Jacques Chirac, Gerhard Schroeder, and other key figures during tense negotiations in meeting rooms, corridors, and private conversations.
Online
2011
95.

The Chinese Bubble [electronic resource]: Predictions and Perspectives

Has China circumvented the economic woes of America and Europe, or is the "Chinese miracle" headed for similar implosions in its housing and financial markets? For answers, this film seeks out the opinions of several Chinese commentators-from respected economists who offer complex analysis to ordinary Beijing citizens who describe their day-to-day struggles with the country's rapid changes. Real estate tycoon Feng Lun, one of the world's most successful developers, is also featured, insisting that opportunities are equal for all in China. But more nuanced views come from a taxi driver, a car salesman, and a construction worker, as well as from Dr. Wang Jianmao of the China Europe International Business School and Shanghai-based economist Dr. Andy Xie.
Online
2011
96.

True Believers [electronic resource]: Religion in Today's China

China is on the rise economically, but the post-Mao era has also seen an increasing hunger for something beyond material prosperity. From the novice Daoist monk honing tai chi skills atop a sacred mountain to the uncountable worshippers of the underground house church movement, this program reports on modern China's emboldened-yet still cautious-religious population. In the city of Wenzhou, evangelical pastor Zheng Datong agrees to be interviewed, despite secret police looking on. Pastor Samuel Lamb, another lightening rod for security surveillance, insists that "oppression simply leads to more believers," while Pastor Joseph Gu, leader of a mainstream Three-Self Patriotic Movement church, describes the rapid growth of his congregation. For a much different yet equally spiritual pers [...]
Online
2011
97.

Golda [electronic resource]

Golda Meir had already retired from public life when she was elected to serve as prime minister of Israel. Thrust into the role at a critical time in her nation's history, she strove to balance many conflicting issues: Arab-Israeli hostilities, U.S. support, and the desire to maintain the upper hand in the Middle East. This program presents a multifaceted portrait of Golda Meir drawn by those who were close to her personally and politically. Her private secretary, former cabinet members, Henry Kissinger, friends and those critical of her decisions-especially concerning the Yom Kippur War-reflect on Meir as an individual and as a world leader.
Online
2006
98.

Slaves of the Sword [electronic resource]: Ariel Sharon

Called "remarkably balanced" by Jewish Week, this program examines the controversial military and political career of Ariel Sharon. Supporters and critics comment on the events that made Sharon a polarizing figure even in his own country: the Qibya Massacre, the bulldozing of refugees' homes, the planting of Israeli settlements in densely populated Palestinian areas, the unpopular 1982 Lebanon War, the Sabra and Shatila Massacre, and hostilities surrounding the Second Intifada in 2001. The video was filmed three years before Sharon's stroke and ends with commenters' thoughts on how he might lead his country into the future.
Online
2003
99.

Sacred and Secret [electronic resource]: Rites of Passage in Bali

Religion in Bali is marked by rituals of high artistry aimed at harmonizing the forces of darkness and light, as this program shows. Ancestor worship, karma, and other key concepts are illustrated through lavish, rare, high-definition footage of a cremation ceremony-considered a joyous prelude to reincarnation-a birth ceremony, a puberty rite, and a wedding. A priest explains the interplay between humans and the spirit world, with input from scholar Graeme MacRae; anthropologist Urs Ramseyer discusses the rites of the indigenous Bali Aga; and Gill Marais, on whose book this film is based, comments on the sacred trance-dances performed by young girls.
Online
2011
100.

Sacred and Secret [electronic resource]: Spirit Possession in Bali

The elaborate rituals and timeless pageantry of Bali make the island unforgettable for visitors, yet few really understand what lies behind the dances, the costumes, and the ceremonies. With gorgeous, high-definition footage this program delves into the spiritual beliefs at the heart of Balinese traditions. Viewers observe the powerful Barong dance, in which participants fall into a trance and are later revived by mantras, and witness a frenetic invocation of the goddess of death not performed for tourists. In addition, the video documents the four months of preparation leading up to a spectacular cremation ceremony for three members of the royal family of Ubud, including the man known as Bali's Last King.
Online
2011