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1.

Can Online Courses Replace a Campus Education? (8/27/14)

Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, that anyone can take from anywhere in the world are the future of higher education or the vehicle of its demise, depending on your perspective. Hari Sreenivasan talks with the man who first created the MOOC, professors who say they undermine the goals of a college education and others who see a way the college classroom and the new online format can be blended.
Online
2017; 2014
2.

How a Great School Is Breaking the Cycle of Poverty in America's Poorest City, Part 2: Remaking Public Education in Camden

The success of charter school LEAP Academy stands out as a success story inCamden, New Jersey, where the school district is considered one of the worst-performing in the nation. Part two of this series documents and discusses why LEAP Academy flourishes. A Reason TV production.
Online
2016; 2015
3.

Why 1995 Is the Year That Created the Future

American University professor of journalism W. Joseph Campbell sat down with Reason TV's Nick Gillespie to discuss the decade of the 1990s in his new book, 1995: The Year the Future Began. From the dawn of the Internet to the post-Cold War complexities of foreign policy, the 1990s set the stage for the most enduring issues of the 21st century. A Reason TV production.
Online
2016; 2015
4.

Online University Skips Class to Be More Accessible (8/25/14)

College for America, an online degree program, has no classes, professors or credit hours. It's been cited as an innovative way to make college more affordable. But how do its students qualify for a degree? Hari Sreenivasan reports from New Hampshire on a university that gives credit based on competency at the student's own pace.
Online
2017; 2014
5.

Big Noise Dispatches No. 5

Dispatches No. 5 provides groundbreaking anti-propaganda news from the Middle East to the American Midwest.
Online
2017; 2010
6.

Mindfulness in the Workplace

Is meditation the key to fostering a happier, more productive workplace? New York Times reporter David Gelles investigates this claim and compares notes with a neuroscientist who specializes in the effect of meditation on the brain, Christopher Moore. Gelles is a staff writer for the New York. Previously, he was a correspondent for the Financial Times, and his work has appeared in Forbes, the Los Angeles Times, and other publications. Christopher I. Moore is Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Brown University where he teaches neural dynamics. How changing brain dynamics can change perception from moment to moment, particularly in meditative states ,is a key focus of his research.
Online
2017; 2015
7.

Happiness

Happiness, moments of happiness, the sharing of happy moments: an exploration.
Online
2018; 2007
8.

I Was a Child

The New Yorker cartoonist and author of the memoir I Was a Child discusses recollection and humor with a cognitive neuroscientist and memory specialist. Bruce Eric Kaplan, also known as BEK, is an American artist whose single-panel cartoons frequently appear in The New Yorker; he is also a screenwriter and producer. Dr. Barry Gordon is a behavioral neurologist and cognitive neuroscientist with expertise in experimental psychology and neuropsychology. He directs the Cognitive Neurology/Neuropsychology group in the Department of Neurology, and was the founder of The Memory Clinic and the Mind/Brain Institute at Johns Hopkins.
Online
2017; 2015
9.

Truckers Struggling: Dan Rather Reports

The American economy survives and thrives because of a highly efficient transportation system that relies on trucks. But the drivers of those trucks are working longer hours and making less money than ever on this episode of Dan Rather Reports.
Online
2016; 2010
10.

The Law Reform Process

In every modern society the laws that govern its citizens are complex and vital. From traffic law and tax law, through to criminal and family law, there are laws that relate to every part of our lives. Laws play a fundamental role in keeping social order in the world, but what happens when society changes and a law becomes outdated? In this program we examine how laws are reviewed and changed; we delve into why we change laws; the role of formal law reform bodies, individuals, parliament and courts in changing the law, as well as the factors that sometimes delay change.
Online
2017; 2010
11.

Gloria Whelan: Homeless Bird (11/23/00)

Gloria Whelan's book Homeless Birdchronicles the story of 13-year-oldKoly whoentered an arranged marriage in India and became a widow. In this interview, Whelandiscusses Koly's story, widows in white sarees,writing about other places, and more.
Online
2017; 2000
12.

American Values, American Wilderness

A diverse group of Americans—including a teenage daughter of Cambodian refugees, a children's book author, a cancer survivor, a Native American tribal chairman, inner city kids, and the late Christopher Reeve, among others—share their values for wilderness.
Online
2017; 2012
13.

In Search of Freedom: Shonda Rhimes, Maya Rudolph, Keenen Ivory Wayans—Finding Your Roots, Season 3

Learn how the ancestors of Maya Rudolph, Shonda Rhimes and Keenen Ivory Wayans struggled for freedom, and how each of these cultural trailblazers gains a new understanding of how they fit into this proud trajectory.
Online
2017; 2016
14.

The Open Road

The Open Road: America Looks at Aging, which premiered on PBS in July 2005, examines the personal and social impact of the impending retirement of America's 77 million Baby Boomers. Through insightful stories of individuals confronting the obstacles and pursuing opportunities presented by the "third stage" of life, The Open Road probes the important social, economic, and cultural issues at stake. It is a film that will make people think, talk, and plan for the road that lies ahead. The Open Road is a key part of a nation-wide dialogue that will include town meetings in 9 select cities, locally-sponsored discussion groups throughout the U.S., articles written on retirement authored by veteran journalists, and the creation of a model communities program. Coupled with this intensive gra [...]
Online
2017; 2005
15.

Shallow Waters

How does a mentally ill person drown himself in a few feet of water on a crowded Memorial Day beach? A tall, middle-aged, fully dressed man walks up to his shoulders into the cold shallow waters of San Francisco Bay; and he waits. Police and Fire units respond in droves; and they wait. A good-sized crowd watches and waits as the sand in the man’s hourglass runs out. Succumbing to the cold and rising tide, the man loses consciousness within the hour. His body is left to drift slowly back to shore…and still, they wait…
Online
2017; 2015
16.

Insider Threats: America’s Surveillance State—Part 5

Though the National Security Agencywas created to keep Americans safe, it is now preoccupied with keeping itself safe from insider threats. As shown in this video, the "threats" often targeted are not employees or contractors endangering human life, but whistleblowers and others who question the agency's actions.
Online
2015; 2014
17.

Contract Faculty: Injustice in the University

The film explores the damage done to higher education, to research, to students and faculty through the ever-increasing reliance upon precarious labor. The film examines the situation of contract faculty, sessionals as they are known in Canada, adjuncts as they are called in the US, largely through their own testimony and that of full time professors as well.
Online
2017; 2016
18.

Marx's Theory of Alienation and Species Being

This film explains the concepts of alienation and species being from Karl Marx's Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844. It also considers the extent of their applicability to contemporary society.
Online
2017; 2014
19.

Borderland: Episode 4

The six Americans prepare for the final leg of their journey. In Culiacan, seat of the powerful Sinaloa drug cartel, they join migrants praying to the bandit saint Jesus Malverde for safe passage. They later trek to the notorious border town of Altar where medical examiner Dr Hess informs them they will next hike the desert. Altar is where "their" migrants – Omar, Maira and Claudeth – were last seen. ‘We are walking into the valley of death,’ says one flustered American. Altar’s local priest helps the group navigate the shops that cater to passing migrants. They stock up and then start the dreaded desert border run. With the day sweltering hot and night temperatures dropping below zero, how long can they last?
Online
2017; 2014
20.

Secrets of the Tower of London—Episode 2

In this program, we meet Alice Tankerville, who attempted to “woo” her way out of trouble with a prison guard; we learn about Watt Tyler, who led the only force to storm the Tower; and how the legend grew that if you took the Tower you took the country.
Online
2018; 2015