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1.

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: Throne of the White Snake

The highest point in Africa, Kilimanjaro is a volcanic massif nearly 20,000 feet high which stands, isolated, above the surrounding plains with its snowy peak looming over the savannah. The mountain is encircled by mountain forest, and numerous mammals, many of which are endangered, live in the park.
Online
2017; 1997
2.

Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania: Noah’s Crater

A large permanent concentration of wild animals can be found in the huge and perfect crater of Ngorongoro. Nearby, the crater of Empakaai, filled by a deep lake, and the active volcano of Oldonyo Lenga can be seen. Excavations carried out in the Olduvai Gorge, not far from there, have resulted in the discovery of one of humankind's more distant hominid ancestors.
Online
2017; 1997
3.

Djenné, Mali: City of Clay

Inhabited since 250 B.C., Djenné developed into a market center and a link in the trans-Saharan gold trade. In the 15th and 16th centuries, it became one of the spiritual centers for the dissemination of Islam. Its traditional houses, of which close to 2,000 have survived, are built on hillocks (toguere) and adapted to the environment of seasonal floods.
Online
2017; 1997
4.

Abomey, Benin: The Kingdom of the Slave Traders

From 1625 to 1900, twelve kings succeeded one another at the head of the powerful Kingdom of Abomey. With the exception of King Akaba, who used a separate enclosure, they each had their palaces built within the same cob-wall area, in keeping with previous palaces as regards the use of space and materials. The royal palaces of Abomey are a unique reminder of this vanished kingdom.
Online
2017; 2001
5.

Taï National Park, Ivory Coast: The Last Jungle

This park is one of the last important remnants of the primary tropical forest of West Africa. Its rich natural flora and threatened mammal species, such as the pygmy hippopotamus and 11 species of monkeys, are of great scientific interest.
Online
2017; 1997
6.

Lalibela, Ethiopia: Jerusalem at the Horn of Africa

The 11 medieval monolithic cave churches of this 13th-century "New Jerusalem" are situated in a mountainous region in the heart of Ethiopia near a traditional village with circular-shaped dwellings. Lalibela is a high place of Ethiopian Christianity that today is still a destination of pilgrimage and devotion.
Online
2017; 2002
7.

Fasil Ghebbi, Ethiopia: A Fortress-Camp

In the 16th and 17th centuries, the fortress-city of Fasil Ghebbi was the residence of the Ethiopian emperor Fasilides and his successors. Enclosed by approximately 1,000 yards of wall, the city contains palaces, churches, monasteries and unique public and private buildings marked by Hindu and Arab influences and subsequently transformed by the Baroque style brought to Gondar by the Jesuit missionaries.
Online
2017; 2003
8.

Gorée, Senegal: The Slave Island

Off the coast of Senegal, facing Dakar, Gorée was, from the 15th to the 19th century, the largest slave trading center on the African coast. Ruled, in succession, by Portuguese, Dutch, English and French powers, its architecture is characterized by the contrast between the dark slave quarters and the elegant houses of the slave traders. Today it continues to serve as a reminder of human exploitation and as a sanctuary for reconciliation.
Online
2017; 1997
9.

Vallée de Mai Nature Reserve: The Seychelles

In the heart of the small island of Praslin, the reserve shelters the vestiges of a natural palm forest preserved in close to its original state. The famous "coco de mer" (palm tree), once believed to come from a tree growing in the depths of the sea, bears the largest seed in the plant kingdom.
Online
2017; 1997
10.

The Mystery of the Great Zimbabwe Ruins, Zimbabwe

The ruins of Great Zimbabwe—according to an age-old legend, the capital of the Queen of Sheba—are a unique testimony to the Bantu civilization of the Shona between the 11th and 15th centuries. This city, covering an area of nearly 200 acres, was an important trading center, renowned since the Middle Ages.
Online
2017; 2000
11.

Bandiagara, Mali: Land of the Dogon

These cliffs protect architectural structures of great beauty (houses, granaries, altars, sanctuaries and toguna—meeting places) which have been for centuries the soul of traditional, secular Dogon culture. The Bandiagara plateau is one of the most impressive geological and landscape features in West Africa.
Online
2017; 1997
12.

The Colonists (1652 - 1795)

This program starts with the arrival of a Dutch sailing vessel that would change the future of the African continent: Jan van Riebeeck is supposed to establish a supply station for European ships sailing the long ocean routes, gathering riches from all over the world. Contact between the earliest settlers and the natives was initially peaceful: copper and tobacco were traded for cattle and sheep. As the influx of settlers from Europe into the “Promised Land” kept growing, so did the demand for land and cattle, which started to worry the natives. The first conflicts arose. The White intruders did not care much for the people who had been living here for thousands of years, but fascinating rock paintings of the San provide impressive insights into their civilization. With the help of r [...]
Online
2017; 2009
13.

Ambohimanga, Madagascar: The Hill of the Kings

The Royal Hill of Ambohimanga consists of a royal city and burial site and an ensemble of sacred places. It is associated with strong feelings of national identity, and has maintained its spiritual and sacred character both in ritual practice and the popular imagination for the past 500 years. It remains a place of worship to which pilgrims come from Madagascar and elsewhere.
Online
2017; 2003
14.

Meroë, Sudan: A Place of Elephant Gods and Lion Temples

The Island of Meroë, a semi-desert landscape between the Nile and Atbara Rivers, was the heartland of the Kingdom of Kush, a major power from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D. The property consists of the royal city of the Kushite kings at Meroë, near the River Nile; the nearby religious site of Naqa; and Musawwarat es Sufra. It was the seat of the rulers who occupied Egypt for close to a century and features, among other vestiges, pyramids, temples and domestic buildings as well as major installations connected to water management. Their vast empire extended from the Mediterranean to the heart of Africa, and the property testifies to the exchange between the art, architectures, religions and languages of both regions.
Online
2017; 2013
15.

Lamu, Kenya: The Magical Stone City

Lamu Old Town is the oldest and best-preserved Swahili settlement in East Africa, retaining its traditional functions. Built in coral stone and mangrove timber, the town is characterized by the simplicity of structural forms enriched by such features as inner courtyards, verandas, and elaborately carved wooden doors. Lamu has hosted major Muslim religious festivals since the 19th century, and has become a significant center for the study of Islamic and Swahili cultures.
Online
2017; 2003
16.

Aksum, Ethiopia: Of the Glory of Kings

The ruins of the ancient city of Aksum are found close to Ethiopia's northern border. They mark the location of the heart of ancient Ethiopia, when the Kingdom of Aksum was the most powerful state between the Eastern Roman Empire and Persia. The massive ruins, dating from between the 1st and the 13th century A.D., include monolithic obelisks, giant stelae, royal tombs and the ruins of ancient castles. Long after its political decline in the 10th century, Ethiopian emperors continued to be crowned in Aksum.
Online
2017; 2006
17.

Accra, Ghana: Where Gold and People Were Shipped Away

The remains of fortified trading-posts, erected between 1482 and 1786, can still be seen along the coast of Ghana between Keta and Beyin. They were links in the trade routes established by the Portuguese in many areas of the world during their era of great maritime exploration.
Online
2017; 2003
18.

Aïr and Ténére, Niger: A Wilderness of Sand and Rock

This is the largest protected area in Africa, covering some 19 million acres. The area considered as a protected sanctuary is only one-sixth of the total area. It includes the volcanic rock mass of the Aïr, a small Sahelian pocket, isolated as regards its climate and flora and fauna in the Saharan desert of Ténéré. The reserve boasts an outstanding variety of landscapes, plant species and wild animals.
Online
2017; 2000
19.

Tsodilo, Botswana: The Whispering Rocks of the Kalahari

With one of the highest concentrations of rock art in the world, Tsodilo has been called the ''Louvre of the Desert.'' Over 4,500 paintings are preserved in an area of only 4 square miles of the Kalahari Desert. The archaeological record of the area gives a chronological account of human activities and environmental changes over at least 100,000 years. Local communities in this hostile environment respect Tsodilo as a place of worship frequented by ancestral spirits.
Online
2017; 2008
20.

Zanzibar, Tanzania: The Sultan’s Island Pearl

The Stone Town of Zanzibar is a fine example of the Swahili coastal trading towns of East Africa. It retains its urban fabric and townscape virtually intact and contains many fine buildings that reflect its particular culture, which has brought together and homogenized disparate elements of the cultures of Africa, the Arab region, India, and Europe over more than a millennium.
Online
2017; 2002