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21.

Whose Truth Is the Truth? [electronic resource]: New Testament Apocrypha and Codification of the Canon

The early Church saw a proliferation of writings all claiming divine authority. This program surveys many of these texts and their adherents, as well as traces the course of the New Testament's codification. Original manuscripts and critical commentary are used to explore the infancy gospels, St. Clement's letters to the Corinthians, and the Gnostic gospels, including the Gospel of Thomas, Gospel of Mary Magdalene, and Gospel of Philip. Key figures and events in the process are also portrayed, including Marcion, Tertullian, the Emperor Constantine and his conversion, the Council of Nicea, and St. Athanasius, who first codified the 27 books of the New Testament.
Online
2005; 2003
22.

Reformation [electronic resource]: Luther and the Protestant Revolt

This program traces the history of the Protestant Reformation, the path of its founder, Martin Luther, and the subsequent rise of sects including Calvinism, Anglicanism, Presbyterianism, and Methodism. Topics discussed include the Council of Trent, the renewal of Catholicism in the 16th and 17th centuries, and the rise of religious orders founded by St. John of the Cross, St. Teresa of Avila, and St. Vincent de Paul.
Online
2005; 1998
23.

The World of the Lindisfarne Gospels [electronic resource]

Filmed on location across England and Ireland, this program takes a close look at the Lindisfarne Gospels-a priceless work of art and one of Christianity's most enduring symbols of faith-and the historical and religious contexts in which it was created. Michelle Brown, curator of illuminated manuscripts at the British Library, explains who made it and why, presents new findings about its dating, and shows how it unites a remarkable range of motifs and styles from the Celtic Iron Age, Germanic prehistory, ancient and Christian Rome, Coptic Egypt, and Byzantium. A wealth of other devotional objects and images from early Christianity are also featured.
Online
2006; 2003
24.

Sacred Space [electronic resource]: Art, Architecture, and the Role of the State

Roman, Gothic, Baroque, and Rococo religious art, along with Christian iconography, are examined as reflections of the religious and political attitudes of the periods in which they were created. This program also examines the role of the Christian Orthodox Church and the schism of 1054 that permanently divided its members. The degrees of reverence accorded to Mary as Christ's mother by Catholics and Protestants are compared.
Online
2005; 1998
25.

A New Saint, a New Art [electronic resource]

St. Francis of Assisi revolutionized Christianity in 13th-century Tuscany with his down-to-earth belief that poverty, chastity, and obedience should shape an individual's relationship with God. By going back to Christ's original message, he played a pivotal role in the genesis of the Renaissance. This poignant program investigates how St. Francis's infusion of emotion and nature into the Christian mainstream inspired artists of the period to produce naturalistic depictions of him that were full of action and feeling. Interviews with Monsignor Timothy Verdon, art historian at Canon Florence Duomo; Franciscan Friar Maurice Richard; and Alexander Nagel, art historian at the University of Toronto, are featured.
Online
2006; 2004
26.

Sectarianism and Schism in Europe [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Part one of this program highlights the Great Schism. The Papacy's move to achieve political independence and the flowering of the Renaissance are presented as well-along with the violent opposition to the new papal politics and the humanism that was remaking God in man's image. Part two plots out the religious revolt sparked by the sale of indulgences, from Martin Luther's 95 Theses, to the Inquisition, to the Protestantism of John Calvin. The spread of the Catholic faith to Latin America by the Jesuits is also discussed.
Online
2007; 1999
27.

The Nightingale of Wittenberg [electronic resource]

Congregational music during worship owes its origin to Martin Luther, who used it to proclaim his bedrock message of the Protestant Reformation: God's grace as the sole ingredient for salvation. This elegant program explains how Luther changed the mode of public worship by integrating music into the divine service so that all Christians-not just the clergy-could express and celebrate their belief. It also highlights Luther's biography, from his time as a professor of Theology in 1512 at Wittenberg University to his "love for the truth and.desire to elucidate it" expressed in his 95 Theses five years later. Excommunicated and under the ban of the Emperor, Luther's love of music in Protestant worship never waned.
Online
2006; 2004
28.

Brazil [electronic resource]

This controversial program highlights the political initiatives taken by Brazil's top two religious entities: Catholics and evangelical Protestants. It argues that the Roman Catholic Church has always been fused with the nation's identity, from statues of Christ in Rio de Janeiro to mark the first centenary of Brazil's independence to the thousands of Brazilian flags waved during morning mass at the Cathedral of Aparecida. Yet the Church has seemed aloof to many Brazilians; fewer than one in ten attend mass regularly. With the growing power of the evangelical movement, a battle against the Catholic establishment begins for political collusion at the time of a crucial presidential election.
Online
2006; 2003
29.

Russia [electronic resource]

It is no irony that Victor Zorkaltsev, a Communist, is also the head of the religious committee of the Russian parliament, the Duma. It is also not an accident that the Russian government paid for an extraordinary replica of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour that is maintained by local businessmen. And if more than 80 percent of Russians describe themselves as Orthodox Christians, why do only 5 percent go to church regularly? These are three of many examples in this potent program that concentrates on the resurgence of the Russian Orthodox Church and how its aspirations to spiritual and political power pose a threat to the fundamental freedoms of many Russians.
Online
2006; 2003
30.

Bringing Up Children [electronic resource]

Is there a crisis of childhood caused by the consumer society and the mass media? "There is impatience in our culture for letting children be children," says Archbishop Rowan Williams, who cites lack of in-depth conversations between parents and children as the main cause for their vulnerability to advertising tactics. In this intriguing program, Archbishop Williams argues with children's author Philip Pullman about the theme of militant moral atheism in Pullman's work, and with abandoned children's charity coordinator Camila Batmanghelidjh, who says that the Anglican Church is behind the times in giving a message that is relevant to troubled children and their experiences.
Online
2006; 2003
31.

Christianity [electronic resource]

This program sheds light on the evolution and spread of Christianity across 13 centuries of architecture and art. Selected sites and masterpieces include the 8th-century monastic settlement on Inishmurray Island, off the coast of Ireland; frescoes in the catacombs of San Domitilla and Caravaggios at Santa Luigi di Franchesi, in Rome; the Hagia Sophia, once a Christian cathedral, in Istanbul; the astonishing underground churches of Lalibela, in Ethiopia; Chartres Cathedral; and the Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Familia, in Barcelona-a visual feast of facades and spires.
Online
2006; 2003
32.

Medieval Spain [electronic resource]

This program uncovers medieval Spain's historical significance through four of its monasteries: Sant Pere Rodes Benedictine Monastery, Santes Creus Cistercian Monastery, Poblet Cistercian Monastery, and Miravet Templar Monastery and Castle. Dr. Francisco Sandoval, from the University of Madrid, and Father Jose Maria Recasens, from the Cistercian Monastery, discuss how the monasteries battled and defended the land against the advance of the invading Islamic army in the 10th century, and were key in preserving Western culture. Dramatizations of village and monastery life against the backdrop of real medieval towns illustrate a chapter in history that is generally unknown.
Online
2006; 2002
33.

Televangelism in Brazil [electronic resource]

Until recently, Brazil was the world's most populous Catholic nation-until the Pentecostal Protestants began a televangelical campaign that has resulted in a national identity crisis. This program examines the TV ratings war between the Pentecostals and the Catholics, whose Charismatics are countering with television programming of their own. Additional insights are offered by Liberation theologian Leonardo Boff.
Online
2007; 1998
34.

In the Name of Christ [electronic resource]

This program examines the forces behind European determination to capture Palestine, linking the belligerence of medieval Crusaders with their piousness. Drs. Klaus Herbers of Friedrich Alexander University and Patrick Franke of Martin Luther University draw surprising parallels between East and West, focusing on martyrdom as a vital component of the Crusader's motivation, interreligious notions of knightly behavior, and cases of negotiation and cultural exchange despite numerous atrocities and military disasters. Without neglecting the harsh realities of the Crusades, In the Name of Christ presents a fresh perspective on the medieval clash of Christian and Islamic powers.
Online
2006; 2004
35.

Christian vs. Christian [electronic resource]

Outlining the provincial causes and ravaging effects of Europe's Thirty Years' War, this program illustrates the ability of religious fervor to inflame nationalism and drive the quest for power. With background on Martin Luther's split with the Catholic Church and the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, Dr. Helmut Neuhaus of Friedrich Alexander University offers detailed analysis of the Hapsburg-Bohemian conflict, the shifting alliances of Catholics and Protestants, and the mercenary campaigns of Wallenstein-leading to a comparison with large-scale natural disaster. The program clearly identifies the three-decade inferno as an inspiration for later divisions of church and state.
Online
2006; 2004
36.

The Birth of a New Religion [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 1st and 2nd Centuries

Part one of this program presents the life of Jesus against the backdrop of first-century Judea, inhabited by the Jews and occupied by the forces of the Roman Empire. Was Jesus the long-awaited Messiah? After the Resurrection, Saul of Tarsus, later Paul, became a champion of a budding new religion based on Jesus' teachings: Christianity. Part two traces the spread of the faith and its inevitable clash with Rome. Despite persecution, Christianity thrived, setting down roots and creating the New Testament.
Online
2007; 1999
37.

The Book of Kells [electronic resource]

The origins of the Book of Kells are uncertain; it was written and illustrated around the year 800, but the monastery where it originated has not been identified. It contains the Latin text of the four Gospels, with some pages in elaborate color; almost every page has brightly-colored birds and animals, and there are portraits of the four evangelists. This program not only shows but identifies the faces and figures and explains the flamboyant decoration and often witty symbolism.
Online
2006; 1987
38.

For a Thousand Tongues to Sing! [electronic resource]: Life and Hymns of Charles Wesley

Between 1738 and 1788, Charles Wesley wrote more than 9,000 hymns and sacred poems, work which earned him the title "The Sweet Bard of Methodism." This program recounts Wesley's life and life's work, with special attention to his better-known songs, such as "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing." Scholars of music and theology speak about Wesley's childhood, education, and missionary work; explore the roots of his passion for hymn-writing; and demonstrate how Wesley's impressive body of work consistently embraced astute references to Scripture, poetic language, and personal experience.
Online
2010; 2007
39.

Inside the Medieval Mind [electronic resource]: Sex

Although rooted in religious misogyny and crude anatomical knowledge, the sexual mores of the medieval era were surprisingly complex. This program explores the attitudes and behaviors of a sexual culture that was by turns romantic, transactional, and perverse. Documents and historical accounts include the story of Christina of Markyate, who defied marital conventions and maintained a lifelong vow of chastity; the more passionate tale of Peter Abelard and Heloise d'Argenteuil, whose 12th-century love letters transcend the brutality of the age; and a list of intrusive questions compiled to help 11th-century priests steer parishioners away from promiscuity. Troubadour poetry and primitive views of menstruation and fertility are also discussed.
Online
2010; 2008
40.

Inside the Medieval Mind [electronic resource]: Belief

Founded in 1230, Scotland's Pluscarden Abbey still pulses with the prayers and spiritual pursuits of Benedictine monks. Abbot Hugh Gilbert describes their work in reassuringly human terms, framing the Christian battle against Satanic evil as an inner struggle within one's own psyche. But, as this program shows, the culture which brought Pluscarden into existence was rigidly institutional-and entrenched in the cosmology of heaven and hell. The film explores demonic possession and brushes with the afterlife, as recorded in documents of the period; the ways in which wealthy believers sought to "purchase" heavenly redemption; and the sanctity conferred upon the bones of martyrs and other religious relics.
Online
2010; 2008