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1.

The Making of Spain: Reconquest

Christianity in the North re-awakens, and one by one the Moslem states fall. Attempts are made by pious Islamic sects from North Africa to win back Spain. By the mid-15th century only the city-state of Granada remains, which is besieged by the warrior Catholic King and Queen - Ferdinand and Isabella. Granada falls in 1492, and 700 years of Muslim rule comes to an end. The Jews are expelled and the inquisition is launched. Simon Sebag Montefiore finds out some distressing information about his own family.
Online
2017; 2015
2.

The Making of Spain: Conquest

This episode spans the early years when Iberia was a minor province of Carthage, through to the glories of Spain's Moslem age and the Cordoba Caliphate. Simon Sebag Montefiore travels to Cadiz with Spain's first invaders and visits a sacred island where the Carthaginian warrior Hannibal received the blessing of the Gods. We learn how early Spain was a battleground for empires, and visit Italica - a perfectly preserved Roman city with one of the finest amphitheaters outside Rome. From there this episode covers the early, brazen Christian Martyrs, the Visigoths and the Moslem conquest.
Online
2017; 2015
3.

The Making of Spain: Nation

Spain enters its Golden Age. King Philip II is a colossus on the European Stage, and for a time is King of England as well as Spain with his brief marriage to Queen Mary. With the power of Spain enhanced by the spoils of the American Empire, Philip founds Madrid and launches a great Armada against England. We visit El Escorial, Philip's mighty palace outside Madrid, and learn how his successors, with their reliance on favorites and mistresses, cannot live up to his reign. The last Hapsburg king Charles II is a victim of inbreeding, and dies childless. Spain is ruled by the Bourbons, becomes part of the Napoleonic Empire and eventually succumbs to a devastating Civil War and dictatorship under Franco before emerging as a modern, twentieth century nation and a model of democratic monarchy.
Online
2017; 2015
4.

Spain: Hospital on the High Seas

Emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille travels to the port of Santander to board the Juan de la Cosa. Every year in June, the Spanish floating hospital accompanies an armada of over 600 tuna-fishing boats off the Gulf of Gascony, bringing aid to fishermen in the event of an accident.
Online
2016; 2013
5.

The Passionate Historian

In this Ideas Roadshow episode, Sir John Elliott of University of Oxford speaks with Howard Burton about how a chance undergraduate encounter with Spain led to a lifetime love affair, along the way describing how the past influences the present and how the field of history is changing.
Online
2015; 2013
6.

Discovering Dali [electronic resource]

Filmmaker Jack Bond Jack travels to Stockholm, Sweden where the Moderna Museet is holding an exhibition of Dali's work and revisits his 1965 film, Dali in New York. Jack explores the enigmatic character of Dali and the surreal nature of his own films. As part of his investigation Jack discusses Dali and his work with museum curators and art historians. He reminisces about his friendship with Salvador Dali and the making of his film. Through the journey Jack discovers the influence Dali had on his own filmmaking and learns more about the personality and politics of the great surrealist.
Online
2015; 2010
7.

Spain [electronic resource]: Yes We Can!

Sally Sara meets the grass roots, social media-driven activists who are turning politics on its head in Spain. Now that they've got the power, what will they do with it?
Online
2015
8.

The Alhambra - Granada [electronic resource]

The Alhambra is a palace, or rather a group of two palaces, built for two consecutive XIVth century caliphs, Yusuf 1st (1333-1353) and Mohammed V (1353-1391). The two palaces are hemmed into an older fortress (X century), crowning a 700 meter-long rocky peak. Here, refinement is everywhere - the porcelain mosaics on the floor, the plasterwork sculpted on the walls, the woodwork sculpted and painted on the ceiling- everything is set out in geometric, floral, or epigraphic patterns. Overall this produces a complex yet harmonious decor. Understanding this division of space, means understanding an architecture that develops from the inside, and not from the facade, an architecture that uses geometry to hide the plan and not to display it.
Online
2015; 2006
9.

Caveman Cold Case [electronic resource]

A tomb of 49,000 year-old Neanderthal bones discovered in the caves of El Sidrón in Northern Spain led to a double mystery: How did this group of individuals die? And, could the fate of this group help explain Neanderthal extinction? Some bones have deep cuts, long bones are cracked and skulls crushed-distinct signs of cannibalism. Was it a result of ritual or hunger? Neanderthal experts are adamant that they were not bloodthirsty brutes. Will this investigation challenge their views? What happened here will take us from El Sidron to the other end of the Iberian Peninsula where scientists are searching for underwater sites off Gibraltar. Scientists working here had theories-but no proof-for why Neanderthals went extinct. El Sidron may change this.
Online
2014
10.

La Muerte de Pancho Villa [electronic resource]

This richly dramatized program covers many of the events of the Mexican Revolution. Its focus is on Villa-on his career, his political objectives, and the reasons for his successes and the loyalty he inspired-and on those whose power he threatened and at whose hands he died.
Online
2012
11.

El Espectador [electronic resource]: The Press and the Drug Lords

This is the extraordinary story of the Bogota newspaper whose offices were bombed and members of whose staff were killed in the pursuit of their work-which included reporting on the details of the Colombian drug trade. This documentary shows how the politics of cocaine can dominate an entire country.
Online
2012
12.

!Esplendores! Splendors of Mexico [electronic resource]

This program follows the magnificent museum exhibition that travels across 33 centuries of Mexican art, from the 12th- to 10th-century B.C. gigantic Olmec heads to Frida Kahlo's self-portrait. The exhibition is divided into four periods: the pre-columbian, whose artistic purpose was to venerate the gods, commemorate the rulers, and give form to the natural world; the Viceregal, whose art was intended to teach the native population about Christianity and turn them into loyal and productive servants of Spain; the 19th century, with its Mexican adaptation of European Romanticism and Naturalism; and the 20th century, with its themes of revolution and pride in Mexico's Indian heritage. The artistic voyage, which covers a range of ages and peoples, beliefs and styles, is united by the stro [...]
Online
2012
13.

Spain [electronic resource]: The Catalonian Cheese Revolution

The past two decades have seen an extraordinary revolution in Spanish cuisine, mostly from Catalan chefs. The region has also led a renaissance in artisan cheese making which virtually disappeared in the Franco era. Will Studd visits the beautiful city of Barcelona where he meets author Eric Canut. The hills outside the city hold the secret to the revival of Catalan cheeses; from the traditional Mato and Tupi, to the newcomer Garrotxa. Next, several chefs demonstrate ways to use the local cheeses in traditional Catalonian dishes. Then it's off to Manorca, the island of cheese, to see how the traditional Mahon cheese is produced.
Online
2012
14.

Tell Me Cuba [electronic resource]

Beginning with a summary of Cuban history from the island's 16th-century subjugation by Spanish conquistadors to the 20th-century communist revolution, this program scrutinizes the current state of U.S./Cuba relations through the eyes of progressives, who want to put the past behind them for the benefit of Cubans still suffering from the decades-long U.S. embargo, and the anti-Castro expatriate community, which sees normalization of relations as a victory for despotism and a repudiation of their deeply held convictions. The political standoff between America and its communist neighbor has consistently defied remediation, and filmmaker Megan Williams does not pretend there is a universally acceptable solution. "Williams takes a complex and divisive subject and captures it with a clear [...]
Online
2010; 2006
15.

Madrid City Guide [electronic resource]: Pilot Guides

Ernest Hemingway once called Madrid "the most Spanish of all the cities." Follow Adela la Ucar through the baroque Royal Palace, a bullfighting stadium, the palace fort of Alcazar, and El Rastro, the famous flea market, in this Pilot Guides episode. Adela tours the imposing Plaza Major, used by the Spanish Inquisition to publicly humiliate heretics but today a bustling urban center, before heading to El Prado Museum to check out two of Spain's greatest artists: Velasquez and Goya. She stays in a hostel called Los Gatos after young, partying Madrileños, meets a cutting edge fashion designer, learns about the Spanish Civil War, attends the Gay Pride festival, admires the 15th-century Gothic cathedral, goes on a Spanish Inquisition tour, visits the Museum of Torture, and meets a traditi [...]
Online
2010
16.

Barcelona City Guide [electronic resource]: Pilot Guides

This Globe Trekker episode follows Megan McCormick through Barcelona in the Spanish region of Cataluña. First Megan learns about the "grey years" between the end of the civil war and General Franco's death, when there was a huge zest for change and the finest architects and planners were persuaded to participate. Before the Civil War gripped Barcelona, Art Nouveau architect Antonio Gaudi shaped it more than any other, and Megan observes the buildings. She visits the Maritime Museum, the Miró Foundation art gallery, the El Raval barrio, surrealist painter Salvador Dali's home, the Museum Picasso, and the street artists of the city harbor. She explores the antique shops, bookstores, and young fashion designers of Gothic Area, as well as the Rey de La Magia, founded by famous magician J [...]
Online
2010
17.

The Moorish South [electronic resource]: Art in Muslim and Christian Spain From 711 to 1492

Under Muslim rule, Spain became the most advanced, wealthy, and populous country in Europe, with great leaps forward in art, architecture, and many other fields. In this program, art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon travels from Cordoba to Seville and on to Granada as he tells the story of art in Islamic and medieval Spain. Richly designed and decorated buildings such as the Great Mosque in Cordoba, the Alcazar in Seville, and the Alhambra in Granada are examined, along with ornate gardens, other objects of art, and even culinary innovations. All of these striking visual examples help viewers understand the debt which both modern Spain and modern Europe owe to Moorish Spain. Contains some objectionable language and images.
Online
2008; 2007
18.

The Dark Heart [electronic resource]: 16th and 17th Century Spanish Art

Art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon continues his travels from southern to northern Spain, revealing a stunning and informative array of artworks. In this program, he journeys to the provinces surrounding Madrid-where, during the 16th and 17th centuries, many of the world's great artists flourished against a backdrop of imperialism and fervent Catholicism. In Toledo, El Greco's mystical style is studied; at the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe, Zurbaran's stark yet sensuous monk portraits come to light. And in Madrid, viewers discover the greatness of Velazquez, who rejected religious subject matter and instead held a mirror up to a crumbling empire. The Escorial, Avila, and Trujillo are also visited. Contains some objectionable language and images.
Online
2008; 2007
19.

The Mystical North [electronic resource]: Spanish Art From the 19th Century to the Present

Northern Spain has produced some of the world's most celebrated artists, including Picasso, Miro, Dali-and Goya, who foreshadowed modern painting with his dark political consciousness. This program studies the artistic and social turmoil that engulfed Spain as the 20th century loomed, dawned, and rolled forward. Recounting Franco's tyranny against free expression, the program looks at Spanish artists who continued to create provocative work, such as exiled film director Luis Bunuel, and those with more spiritual motives, exemplified by Antoni Gaudi's uncanny structures. Today's visionary Spanish artists and architects, such as the esteemed Santiago Calatrava, are also profiled. Contains some objectionable language and images.
Online
2008; 2007
20.

The Moors [electronic resource]: At the Height of Empire

With the grandeur and geometric sophistication of the Alhambra as a powerful opening example, this program looks at Islamic culture in southern Spain following the Berber invasion of 711. Scholar Bettany Hughes talks with Professor Antonio Fernandez-Puertas of the University of Granada, who has studied Nasrid art and architecture for 40 years; with Professor Lauro Olmo Encisco of Alcala University in Madrid, an expert on the Visigothic site of Recopolis; and with Islamic historian Ali Raisuni, who posits noble motives behind Moorish expansion. These conversations, as well as the program's energetic visuals and helpful overviews of Islam's origins, yield valuable insight into the social, economic, scientific, and military dynamics of the period.
Online
2007