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1.

1945 [electronic resource]: Year of Victory

This program contains contemporary newsreels shown to American and British movie audiences at year's end-important not only for the events shown, but for the emphases and biases of the participants in those events. The year 1945 began with V2s targeted on London and the Battle of the Bulge on the Continent. But then events rushed to their inevitable conclusion: the Russian attacks toward Berlin; the Yalta Conference; blistering air attacks on Germany and the crossing of the Rhine; the death of Roosevelt; Soviet and American armies converging; the surrender of Italy and the end of Mussolini; the surrender of the Germans; and the Nuremberg Trials. On the Pacific Front: the recapture of the Philippines and Burma; Iwo Jima and the historic raising of the American flag; the bombing of Tok [...]
Online
2012
2.

The Master Race [electronic resource]

This program shows how and why the Nazi concept of racial superiority developed, and how and why the German nation was organized to achieve it. It focuses on the 1936 Olympics as grist for the German propaganda mill; organized, planned persecution as an element of government policy; political suppression and anti-Semitism; Mein Kampf as a blueprint; the Nuremberg Laws defining racial purity; Joseph Goebbels and the Big Lie; and how German youth were educated to support the goals of the Nazi state.
Online
1984
3.

Paris [electronic resource]: The Crazy Years

I will live as I choose is a motto that sums up the spirit of licentious 1920s Paris among native Parisians, emigres from across Europe, and American expatriates alike. During Les Annees Folles-The Crazy Years-Paris pulsated with energy, eccentricity, and uninhibited expression in sex, art, music, and literature. In this program, authors Amanda Vaill (Everybody Was So Young), Tyler Stovall (Paris Noir: African Americans in the City of Light), Julie Martin and Billy Kluver (Kiki's Paris), Jean-Claude Baker (Josephine), and others bring interwar Paris back to life through depictions of some of the colorful people who made both Montparnasse and Montmartre the chic places to be: Salvador Dali, Ernest Hemingway, Man Ray, Kiki, Harry and Caresse Crosby, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, [...]
Online
2005
4.

The Battle of the Marne [electronic resource]

The Battle of the Marne is the demarcation between the ancient and the modern world, between wars fought with white gloves and those fought by killing machines. This program examines the roots of the First World War: France's humiliating loss of Alsace and Lorraine in 1870; in the growing nationalisms, the pan-Germanism promoted by the Kaiser and the pan-Slavism by Tsar Nicholas; the jealousy and arrogance of the Germans, and their growing industrial power; the decay of the Austro-Hungarian Empire; the intertwining ententes and alliances, the words of honor given that would send millions to their deaths. The program documents the struggles, the forced marches, the uneven confrontation between well-trained soldiers and patriotic farmers; portrays the leaders on both sides; and details [...]
Online
1991
5.

Solidarity [electronic resource]

On August 31, 1980, the first independent trade union in the history of the Soviet bloc was born. Forged in two weeks of nationwide strikes, Poland's Solidarity union became a reality after 25 years of struggle culminated in the signing of the Gdansk Accords between Lech Walesa and the Polish government. But victory was not that close, and this program follows the threat of Soviet military intervention, the struggle by Polish farmers for the same rights as industrial workers, the political career of Lech Walesa, Jaruzelski's get-tough policy with Solidarity and Archbishop Glemp's support of the union, violence and the dissolution of Solidarity, the Pope's visit to Poland, and the end of Communist Party rule in Poland as Stevie Wonder sings at a Solidarity campaign meeting-and Poland' [...]
Online
2012
6.

Berlin [electronic resource]: Metropolis of Vice-Legendary Sin Cities

During the Weimar Republic, Berlin was a cauldron of hedonism; uncensored and untiring, the city indulged in every form of sex. And just as Berlin was open-minded toward all things erotic, it was also tolerant toward avant-garde artistic expression, liberal political dialogue, and wide-ranging scientific inquiry. In tracing the sociopolitical history of the era, this program spotlights key figures of those heady times, including Claire Waldoff, Marlene Dietrich, Anita Berber, Magnus Hirschfeld, Christopher Isherwood, Rudolf and Speedy Schlichter, George Grosz, Bertolt Brecht, and Kurt Weill. In addition, insightful commentary is provided by authors Anton Gill (A Dance Between Flames: Berlin Between the Wars), Alexandra Richie (Faust's Metropolis: A History of Berlin), Mel Gordon (Vol [...]
Online
2005
7.

The '20s [electronic resource]: From Illusion to Disillusion

The wild and crazy '20s... the Jazz Age... the dangerous decade that laid the groundwork for many of the debacles of the remainder of the century. The end of World War I marked the end of the sufferings of war, and of the standards and expectations of the 19th century: hems came up, morality was redefined, and the search was on for the new. The '20s were a fertile time for artistic innovation and for dictatorships-the cruelties of the Bolshevik Revolution were only a prologue to the works of Stalin; Mussolini rose to power; Poland's democracy died; Hitler's Brown Shirts made themselves known. The decade of technological innovation, of Lindbergh's transatlantic flight and Jack Dempsey's heavyweight championship, of Sacco and Vanzetti, of Fitzgerald and Hemingway, of Coco Chanel and t [...]
Online
2012
8.

The Phony War [electronic resource]

It is 1938 and Chamberlain goes to Munich to bargain with Hitler for "peace in our time." It was not to be. Instead, Hitler invades Czechoslovakia; Britain introduces conscription as trenches are dug and sandbags appear throughout London. Poland is invaded and Britain declares war. London evacuates its children and the British Expeditionary Force embarks for France. British shipping is being sunk, but this is nevertheless the "Phony War." Blackouts are introduced and traffic accidents double. Churchill replaces Chamberlain. The BEF is routed in France and the disaster of Dunkirk becomes a miracle. De Gaulle flies to London as Paris falls.
Online
1990
9.

The Hungarian Uprising [electronic resource]: 1956

This program shows the steely face of Communism as the Soviets sent troops to Hungary to suppress popular discontent with the government. The program shows what happened in the aftermath of Prime Minister Imre Nagy's announcement that Hungary was withdrawing from the Warsaw Pact: Soviet troops entered Budapest and other centers and simply crushed the revolt. Thousands of Hungarians died and 150,000 fled the country. The program shows the uprising and its aftermath: Hungary's resumption of its place in the Eastern Bloc (which included joining Soviet troops in putting down the Czech attempts at liberalization in 1968); the exile of Cardinal Jozsef Mindszenty in the U.S. Embassy; and the gradual economic reforms that made Hungary the most Western part of the Eastern Bloc.
Online
2012
10.

The Berlin Wall [electronic resource]

The forerunner of the wall-the blockade of Berlin-was imposed by the Soviets in response to the introduction of a new currency in West Germany; and the fall of the wall, ultimately, was due to the pressure of that currency and what it could buy. This program covers the Airlift of 1949, the sealing off of crossing points in East Berlin in 1961, and the construction of the wall proper in 1962. The program covers the history of the wall: its erection, some touching and dangerous escapes, President Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech, Checkpoint Charlie, the exodus to West Germany, and the dismemberment of the wall.
Online
2012
11.

Arundel Castle [electronic resource]

There has been an Arundel Castle since before the Norman conquest. Home of the Dukes of Norfolk since 1556, Arundel's fortunes rose and fell along with those of the Howard family. The present Duke of Norfolk shows us the splendors of his ancestral home, and tells us why his family history has such an "aura of fatal glory.
Online
1984
12.

Penshurst Place [electronic resource]

Once the home of the unfortunate Dukes of Buckingham, Penshurst Place was confiscated by Henry VIII. The great house was finally given by his son Edward VI to the Sidney family, whose descendent, Lord De L'Isle, lives there today. We walk with him through wings of the many different periods that form Penshurst. We listen to his theory of "conjugal architecture" and the stories of his ancestors.
Online
1984
13.

Pope Benedict XVI [electronic resource]: My Vatican

As Pope John Paul II's right-hand man and most influential theological advisor, Cardinal became known as "God's Rottweiler." Now, the world knows him as Pope Benedict XVI. No one understands the Vatican - where the Pope is absolute ruler and the official language is still Latin - better than he does. In this intimate documentary, he provides a first-hand glimpse into life there. From the archives of the Inquisition to the catacombs and museums, he guides viewers around to numerous locations inaccessible to the public. Many have never been filmed before. It's a fascinating insight into the world of the Pope.
Online
2005
14.

Secret Gardens of Ireland [electronic resource]

Ireland keeps its secrets to itself. At the extreme western limit of Europe, in County Kerry, at a latitude that is barely south of Moscow's, fabulous gardens were created during the late 19th century. As veritable open-air botanical museums, these gardens cradle living collections of what in the plant world counts as most mysterious and rare. Here, the treasures of these tranquil gardens are revealed, displaying a Noah's Ark of spectacular vegetation.
Online
1986
15.

Making the World Safe for Democracy [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

As the United States reshaped Manifest Destiny for use in the 20th century, the concept came to be equated not with conquest and expansion, but with the spread of American values and institutions. Focusing on World War I and the Russian Revolution, the section "A New World Order" traces the deflected trajectory of President Wilson's idealistic plan to export democracy - a plan that ended in compromises and broken dreams. "Containment," which begins with World War II, examines the spread of communism in Asia and U.S. opposition to it via the Kennan policy of containment and the Truman Doctrine. And "Quagmire" discusses how the Kennedy and Johnson administrations felt duty-bound to escalate American political and military involvement in Vietnam as a part of an ideological proxy war bet [...]
Online
2010
16.

The Blitz [electronic resource]

The final phase of the Battle of Britain takes place as the Blitz continues. One Londoner in every six is made homeless, but Hitler fails to gain supremacy of the air and the invasion of Britain is cancelled. Despite the pounding of London, morale remains high among Londoners. The Luftwaffe broadens its targets with attacks on Britain's major ports and an appallingly destructive raid on Coventry. Atlantic convoys suffer as U-boat packs exact a heavy toll. Over 40,000 are killed in the Blitz.
Online
1990
17.

The Final Chapter [electronic resource]

Hitler suffers crushing defeat in Russia, though at enormous cost to the Soviets. Three million fighting men (and some women) are stationed in the U.K., poised to invade Europe. D-Day is the 6th of June, and within days of the first landing, over 300,000 Allied soldiers are fighting on French soil. The French resistance fights street battles in Paris as the Allies approach. V-1 and V-2 bombs pose a new threat to London, but by April, Berlin is surrounded and Hitler is said to commit suicide. Germany is defeated, but the war against Japan will continue for a further three months.
Online
1990
18.

The Tide Turns [electronic resource]

The shared suffering has created a new comradeship and determination-"London can take it!" Americans are told. Nevertheless, one military disaster follows another as Rommel triumphs in North Africa. Britain suffers acute shortages of food, as three merchant ships on average are sunk every day. Food rationing is introduced, and the U.S. begins its Lend-Lease program. Women contribute as never before, working in factories, in the women's branches of the armed forces, and in civil defense. Gradually, thanks to the intervention of the United States and the German debacle on the Russian front, the tide begins to turn in the West.
Online
1990
19.

Uspomene 677 [electronic resource]: Determining Bosnia's Future

Six hundred and seventy-seven concentration camps were established during the Bosnian war. The way the victims and the perpetrators within each community deal with this dark legacy will determine the country's future. From a grim outlook to a fragile optimism, this film tells the whole story. It shares the viewpoint of each ethnic group (the Serbs, Bosnians, and Croats) and shows how a new generation is coming to terms with its toxic past. Living in a Bosnia fighting for EU membership, they're desperate to find a way to live together. A haunting profile of a 20-year legacy.
Online
2012
20.

Codebreakers [electronic resource]: Bletchley Park's Lost Heroes

During World War II, British mathematician Bill Tutte broke a code ten times tougher than Enigma, with the help of engineer Tommy Flowers, who designed the world's first programmable computer to help decipher encrypted German messages. This program tells the story of how Tutte and Flowers, working with a handful of brilliant men at secret intelligence base Bletchley Park, devised a way for Churchill to hack in to Hitler's communications network, winning the war and ushering in the age of computers.
Online
2011