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1.

Monks [electronic resource]: Keepers of Knowledge

As hubs of spiritual and scientific activity, monasteries were the information centers of the Middle Ages. This program explores the varying missions-and the often-cloaked thoughts and feelings-of the medieval monk, within the larger context of the era's highly regulated and intrigue-ridden religious life. With a focus on the interaction of European and Arab cultures, as well as the importance of libraries and pre-Christian texts, the program's discussions of medicine, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy portray monastic life as full and surprisingly worldly: not only the zenith of introspection, but an arena of passion, exploration, and power struggle. Portions are in other languages with English subtitles.
Online
2006; 2004
2.

Knights and Nobles [electronic resource]

This program surveys the courtly culture of armored knights, their duties and privileges, and their significance in the religious and political conflicts of the Middle Ages. Presided over by royalty, knights formed an elite caste with a code of honor steeped in the arts of hand-to-hand combat and chivalry. Knights and Nobles examines their everyday customs, coats of arms, weaponry, and-with the help of an elaborate historical reconstruction-the castles which sheltered them between campaigns. The program climaxes with the Battle of Crecy in 1346, which initiated infantry-style warfare and effectively ended knighthood in the military sense. Portions are in other languages with English subtitles.
Online
2006; 2004
3.

Peasants, Serfs, and Servitude [electronic resource]

During the Middle Ages, most of Europe's inhabitants were illiterate and lived in the shadow of the wealthy; knowledge of peasant culture is therefore limited. This program addresses the historical lack of firsthand written materials, viewing serfs and servants through the eyewitness accounts of a fictitious traveler. Although a peasant farmer's daily existence was indeed oppressive, defined by taxation and compulsory military service to the ruling noble, the program details innovations of the era-including the horse-drawn iron plough and the three-field planting system-amounting to an agricultural revolution that set the stage for a heavily populated, modern Europe. Portions are in other languages with English subtitles.
Online
2006; 2004
4.

Bankers, Builders, and New Beginnings [electronic resource]

This program illustrates life from the perspective of the medieval merchant: urban, financially sophisticated, and revolving around trade and travel. Demonstrating how the growth of European cities prefaced the end of feudal society and the founding of major universities-while unfortunately enabling the spread of the Black Plague-the program reveals surprising facts regarding city planning, banking practices, cartography, and the skyscrapers of the Middle Ages, cathedrals. In essence, a new civilization emerges in this final episode of Europe in the Middle Ages, due in part to the creation of urban centers as bases for global exploration and conquest. Portions are in other languages with English subtitles.
Online
2006; 2004
5.

Radio Revolution [electronic resource]: Broadcasting for Freedom in Cold-War Romania

Likened to "a strange religion. with millions of invisible believers," Radio Free Europe gave listeners in Eastern Bloc countries a much-needed alternative to government media. This program examines the impact of RFE broadcasts on Nicolae Ceausescu's Romania and the lengths to which Romanian authorities went to suppress U.S.-backed radio. Viewers learn how the 1977 Vrancea Earthquake enabled RFE to step up its activities in the country; how Ceausescu's operatives in the Romanian Securitate-and, allegedly, even the notorious terrorist Carlos the Jackal-committed violent acts against RFE personnel; and how the power and popularity of RFE found full expression in the Romanian Revolution.
Online
2010; 2009
6.

Global Car [electronic resource]: Who Really Builds the American Automobile?

Once a shining example of national ingenuity and prowess, the American car is now assembled through a constantly shifting global process. This program presents the fascinating story of where in the world a quintessentially American product is actually built. Focusing on the Dodge Ram pickup and tracing the origins of its components, the film paints a portrait of the global economy-a collage, as it were, representing hundreds of independently manufactured parts circulating through forty different countries. Highlighting the supply chain that produces radiator caps, the film travels from India to Tennessee to England to Dusseldorf as managers and workers in each location explain their roles in the system.
Online
2010; 2009
7.

It's Time [electronic resource]: African Women Join Hands Against Domestic Violence

Once accepted as a cultural norm in Africa, domestic violence is increasingly recognized for what it is-an assault on the rights and well-being of women, as well as a major impediment to progress on the continent. This program examines the issue in Ethiopia and South Africa, focusing on efforts to reduce and hopefully eliminate violence against women. Viewers meet survivors of domestic abuse and sex crimes who are regaining control over their lives in safe houses and educational centers. Also featured are Nomfundo Mogapi of South Africa's Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation; Annalize Teichmann, a South African prosecutor; Senait Berhanu of Ethiopia's Addis Ababa Women's Association; and other activists.
Online
2010; 2009
8.

Sold [electronic resource]: Fighting the New Global Slave Trade

Evoking the spirit of 19th-century abolitionism, this program enters the lives of three anti-slavery activists in today's developing world. Symphorienne Kessouagni works to protect vulnerable children in rural Togo, keeping them away from traffickers and helping young slaves escape. Sunitha Krishnan is a former Hindu nun in Hyderabad, India, who runs 17 schools for former brothel workers and lobbies officials to enforce anti-slavery laws. Ansar Burney is a Karachi attorney who retrieves Pakistani boys forced to perform as jockeys in the brutal sport of camel racing. Each activist speaks in eloquent detail about his or her experiences and the psychological scars - as well as the resilience - of those freed from slavery.
Online
2010; 2009
9.

Mongolia [electronic resource]: Wrestling With Change

Close to the Russian border, far removed from Mongolia's polluted and overcrowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar, an ancient herding culture fights to maintain its identity-and its survival. This program examines the nomadic communities of the Mongolian plains and their resistance to change, despite growing pressure on many herders to modernize and migrate to urban areas. Viewers meet some who hold fast to the old ways and some who have already moved to the city, even though they long for the open landscape and acknowledge that "a Mongolian without a horse is like a bird without wings." Scholar Tsedev Dojoo further explores the impact of Mongolia's new emphasis on commercial agriculture, mineral extraction, and other industries.
Online
2010; 2009
10.

Niger [electronic resource]: In the Shadow of Noma

Noma is an acute oral infection that attacks young, malnourished children. If left untreated-which, tragically, is often the case in Africa-it devours bone tissue and permanently disfigures its victims. This unflinching program studies the impact of the pitiless disease and will help viewers assess the ability and readiness of the international community to combat the suffering. Graphic scenes of school-age noma patients are interwoven with commentary from medical experts and heartbreaking accounts from family members who have watched as sons, daughters, and grandchildren succumb to the sickness. The film also describes low-cost interventions that could keep noma from spreading, if resources are made available.
Online
2010; 2009
11.

A Fresh Look at the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Zambia, and South Africa [electronic resource]

This program concentrates on the central and southern African countries of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Zambia, and South Africa. In Kinshasa and Lubumbashi, Jonathan Dimbleby meets a Congolese band whose polio-stricken members sing a message of hope; learns about China's deep investments in Africa's infrastructure and future successes; admires the Kimbangist Symphony Orchestra and Chorus; and marvels at how worn-out locomotives are repaired and kept in service. In and around Lusaka, he tours a Zambian-owned and -operated commercial farm and meets a world-champion female boxer and the inventor "Dr. Reason Why." And in Johannesburg and Durban, he rides with a biker group that spreads a message of empowerment to at-risk South African children; talks with jazz musician/activist [...]
Online
2010
12.

Who's Afraid of Wilhelm Reich? [electronic resource]: A 21st-Century Reappraisal

The Austrian-born psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich, whose work varied from profound to radically unconventional, died in an American prison in 1957. This program documents his life and the progressively defiant actions and ideas that brought it to such an ignominious end. Interviews with prominent members of Germany's medical and psychoanalytic community help to clarify Reich's initially productive collaboration with Sigmund Freud-specifically, how Freud's concept of the libido influenced Reich's theories concerning what he called "orgone," or life energy. The wide array of scientific conclusions that Reich reached before and after immigrating to the U.S., his interactions with Albert Einstein, and detailed recollections from his daughters Eva and Lore, are also featured.
Online
2010; 2009
13.

Flip the Coin [electronic resource]: A Tower of Promises-Telecom Giants in Bangladesh

This is the ugly face of globalization, says A. R. Chowdhury-Repon, director of the Bangladesh Occupational Health, Safety, and Environment Foundation. He refers to a failure on the part of Western multinationals to ensure worker safety and proper environmental procedures in developing countries, and his description is echoed by many others throughout this program. Hidden camera interviews reveal shocking practices in steel factories across Bangladesh-from water pollution to child labor to a complete lack of protection from falls, fire, and hazardous materials. These factories are direct suppliers of the telecom companies Ericsson and Telenor, whose officials also appear on camera, in some cases promising to make amends, in others downplaying any association with wayward vendors. A m [...]
Online
2010; 2009
14.

Opium Part 3. The War on Drugs [electronic resource]: A Blessing and Curse

Decades after Richard Nixon launched his anti-drug campaign, illicit opiates are cheaper, more potent, and easier to obtain than ever. Is it possible to wipe out addiction by keeping narcotics illegal, or has their ban caused more problems than it's solved? This program reveals how the war on drugs started and who its real targets were, examining its consequences and unintended victims. Afghan farmers who relied on poppy cultivation to survive now lash out against NATO forces in frustration; in the U.S., communities suffer when parents are jailed for relatively minor infractions; and patients in the developing world are denied access to painkillers because strict regulations make doctors too nervous to prescribe.
Online
2010
15.

Opium Part 1. For Pleasure and for Pain [electronic resource]: A Blessing and Curse

Both the painkilling and pleasurable effects of opium have been known in ancient cultures around the world for millennia. The narcotic arrived in the U.S. with the first Chinese immigrants, but it wasn't until the invention of the hypodermic syringe during the Civil War that opiates infiltrated American society in the same dual role. This program looks at the history of opium's use and misuse, from cure-all and "child-quieter" to the racist attitude that led to its ban, to the pharmaceutical industry's liability in creating a whole new breed of addict.
Online
2010
16.

Opium Part 2. Traders and Traffickers [electronic resource]: A Blessing and Curse

The drug lords of Afghanistan sell their goods packaged, branded, and labeled with guarantees, mimicking the marketing of legal forms of opiates. Yet legitimate drug companies themselves face censure for aggressively promoting addictive opiate-based medicine. This program exposes the business of opium, whether distributed legally or smuggled from Afghanistan, examining its economic importance, its devastating impact in the form of dependence and disease, and the high-level corruption that keeps trade routes open while global addiction continues to grow.
Online
2010
17.

Tropical Storms [electronic resource]: Bangladesh's Cyclone Aila

With extraordinary footage shot during and after Severe Cyclonic Storm Aila, this program looks at the causes and effects of the violent weather event in Bangladesh. Viewers learn how cyclones take shape and develop, witness scenes of Aila striking coastal areas, and explore the social, economic, and ecological consequences through expert commentary and first-hand accounts. The film returns to specific areas a year after the storm and provides examples of how NGOs and government agencies are working together to reduce both the short- and long-term impact of cyclones through better monitoring, predictions, preparation, disaster relief, and poverty alleviation strategies. Eye-catching graphics help explain scientific concepts.
Online
2011
18.

Rural Challenges [electronic resource]: Case Studies From South India

India is the planet's biggest producer of over 22 different cash crops, making its agricultural economy the second largest in the world. Why then does most of its rural population live below subsistence level, relying on foreign NGOs for aid? This program looks at reasons why working villagers remain in poverty, including government policies that direct funding away from development and towards the urban business boom. Viewers meet several struggling families and learn how microcredit programs are helping them boost their household income.
Online
2009
19.

Flooding in Bangladesh [electronic resource]: Causes, Impacts, and Management

Taking viewers deep inside a devastated landscape, this program examines physical forces directly tied to flooding in Bangladesh as well as the broader causes of such disasters, including climate change. It also explores the social, economic, and environmental impact of intense flooding through the personal accounts of people living by major rivers and on Bangladesh's char lands, areas built up from river sediment. Examples of flood management strategies are explored, with a look at the pros and cons of hard and soft engineering. Additionally, the film shows how NGOs are working with flood-affected communities to reduce the developing world's vulnerability to future floods.
Online
2011
20.

West Africa [electronic resource]

A collection of extraordinary plaques, seized as loot during the colonial aggression that ended the powerful Benin Empire in 1897, depict life in the African kingdom's royal court at its height. In this program art historian Gus Casely-Hayford travels to legendary Timbuktu, the Great Mosque of Djenn, the Oba Royal Palace, and Dogon country to learn more about how the plaques were made and what they reveal about the continent's sophisticated pre-colonial civilizations. In addition, Casely-Hayford meets with local historians, village elders, and craftspeople from hereditary guilds still using an ancient mix of metallurgical skill and spiritual practice to create traditional works of art.
Online
2011; 2009