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1.

Early Christianity [electronic resource]

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In the first centuries A.D., barbarian attacks and other factors made the Roman Empire increasingly unstable. People rejected Greco-Roman rationalism and turned toward Mithraism, Judaism, and an emerging Christianity. Concurrently, an increasingly insecure society produced art objects to ward off witches and demons.
Online
1989
2.

Crescent and Cross [electronic resource]: Rise of Islam and Age of Crusades

This program portrays the Crusades as a response to the rapid rise of Islam. It looks at various orders of Christian monks and their role in the preservation of religious, artistic, and cultural aspects of civilization. The Inquisition-the Church's response to the rise of heresy and the practice of witchcraft and magic in the Middle Ages-illustrates the ultimate in religious intolerance which still exists today.
Online
2005; 1998
3.

A Separate Peace [electronic resource]: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Shintoism

This program examines the structure and major tenets of these four eastern religious philosophies. The role of the spiritual master in Hinduism is defined, and the belief in transcendental power and a multitude of deities is explained. The history of Buddhism is traced from the 6th century BC. Reincarnation and nonviolence are discussed as major beliefs. Chinese Taoism, especially its stress on the equilibrium of forces, is examined. Shintoism, a Japanese religion, is presented as a form of animism in which nature is composed of a multitude of deities: the kami. Shintoism's coexistence in Japan with Buddhism is explained as follows: "Shintoism is in charge of birth and marriage; Buddhism is in charge of death.
Online
2006; 1998
4.

Holy Days [electronic resource]: Christian and Jewish Feasts and Rituals

Christmas, Easter, Passover, Yom Kippur, Bar or Bas Mitzvah, and other significant feasts and rituals of the Christian and Jewish faiths are discussed in this program. Jesus is shown as the role model for Christian behavior as exhibited by the early martyrs and saints. Protestantism's rejection of saints as religious icons is examined. The spiritual characters of specific modern "saints," including Gandhi, Mother Teresa, and Sister Emmanuelle, are examined.
Online
2006; 1998
5.

Changing Christianity [electronic resource]: From Schism to Ecumenism

The French Revolution explodes, and the Church, at the center of the controversy, must redefine its relationship with political power. This program focuses on religious controversy throughout the ages to the 19th century, when Christianity finds a new vitality and diversity of worship in democratic societies. Vatican II (1962-1965) is discussed as having paved the way for modern Catholicism, and the Protestant Ecumenical movement, also of the 1960s, is credited with reconciliation among the various Christian denominations.
Online
2006; 1998
6.

Different Paths [electronic resource]: Shamanism, Cults, and Religion on Demand

In animism, good and bad spirits exercise an influence on humans. The shaman communes with the spirits in order to heal his tribal constituency. These and other less traditional beliefs, practices, and rituals are the topics of this program. Millenarianism is discussed as a nostalgic belief in a 1,000-year reign of the saints either before, or immediately after, the return of Christ. Astrology is examined as a New Age religious tool, and the upsurge in New Age religions is attributed to modern disillusionment with organized religion.
Online
2006; 1998
7.

African Ascetics and Celtic Monks [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 5th and 6th Centuries

Part one of this program features the sacking of Rome and introduces Augustine of Hippo and his The City of God, which examines the Church's uneasy relationship with human frailty and worldliness, as piety became identified with self-denial and celibacy was viewed as central to the pursuit of perfection. Part two tracks the spread of Christianity to Ireland and its establishment in Britain and northern Europe by Celtic monks, who had formulated the concept of penance and the culture of pilgrimage. However, it was not the Christianity of Saint Patrick, but of Rome, that succeeded in dominating Britain.
Online
2007; 1999
8.

Byzantium and the Holy Roman Empire [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 7th and 8th Centuries

Part one of this program contrasts the ill health of Rome and its Church with the spiritual and material vitality of Byzantium. But all was not well even in the east, as war with Persia and the rise and swift spread of Islam made the Holy Land off-limits, while arguments about the nature of Christ continued to split the Christian world. Part two focuses on the conversion of the Saxon tribes first by Bishop Boniface-the Apostle of Germany-and then by King Charlemagne, who was crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Leo III.
Online
2007; 1999
9.

Crusaders and Schism in the East [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 11th and 12th Centuries

Part one of this program documents both the papal reforms that severed the ties between the Church and wealthy Roman families and the rift between Rome and Constantinople. Efforts to reconcile differences in doctrine, clerical practice, and political influence ended in the excommunication of Constantinople's Patriarch. Part two outlines the first four Crusades, in which Jerusalem was won and lost and Byzantium fell to the swords of its own Christian allies. The transfiguring influence of Islamic scholarship on Europe is also spotlighted.
Online
2007; 1999
10.

Heresy, War, and the Black Death [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 13th and 14th Centuries

Part one of this program follows the dual enterprises of constructing cathedrals and stamping out heresy. Buildings of unprecedented grandeur exemplified the power and influence of the Church in Europe, as did the systematic destruction of the heretic Cathars. Part two covers King Philip IV of France's defiance of Church authority and the Black Death. Although the Pope declared the Plague a judgment by God, rumors of a Jewish plot were rife, leading to anti-Semitic massacres in Germany and elsewhere.
Online
2007; 1999
11.

Fighting Intolerance and Slavery [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 17th and 18th Centuries

Part one of this program traces the spread of Christianity via the Puritans to North America. Victims of intolerance in the Old World, the emigres swiftly proved intolerant of others in the New World, leaving it to the Quakers to promote the religious freedom later associated with the United States. Part two outlines the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, the Methodism of John Wesley, and the concept of human rights. How had the un-Christian institution of slavery endured so long in France, England, and, most notably, in egalitarian America?
Online
2007; 1999
12.

Coping With Scientific and Social Change [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Part one of this program, presented against a backdrop of Gothic architecture and pre-Raphaelite art, asks whether religion and science can coexist in a post-Darwinian world. Are Creation and Evolution mutually exclusive? Part two focuses on the questions raised by the global movement toward social equality. Must Christianity adapt to survive, and if so, do issues like female priests and homosexuality threaten to rob it of its scriptural authority? Should the Church restructure along democratic lines? And what role will New Age religions and the Pentecostal movement play as Christianity enters its third millennium?
Online
2007; 1999
13.

Batak [electronic resource]: Ancient Spirits, Modern World

This program featuring sociocultural anthropologist James Eder-author of On the Road to Tribal Extinction-travels to the island of Palawan in the Philippines archipelago to document the Batak tribe's eco-friendly hunter/gatherer way of life. Repeatedly displaced by immigrants and increasingly driven to take part in the island's growing cash economy, the tenacious Batak struggle to maintain their cultural and spiritual identity while attempting to adapt to the modern world. Can conservationists, who approve of their sustainable methods of harvesting, help to secure the tribe's ancestral forest before it is all lost?
Online
2005; 2000
14.

The Myth of the Holy Grail [electronic resource]

The Holy Grail may be history's most legendary artifact, but did it ever really exist and, if so, was it a chalice or something very different? Filmed at key locations in England and France, this program follows the intriguing efforts of two modern-day Grail hunters, providing along the way a concise account of the Grail story, its role in Arthurian legend, and its enduring fascination. Dramatic reenactments, paintings, and original manuscripts are blended with commentary from scholars, archaeologists, and experts, including Graham Phillips, author of The Search for the Grail, and Henry Lincoln, author of Key to the Secret Pattern and co-author of Holy Blood, Holy Grail.
Online
2006; 2003
15.

Reformation [electronic resource]: Luther and the Protestant Revolt

This program traces the history of the Protestant Reformation, the path of its founder, Martin Luther, and the subsequent rise of sects including Calvinism, Anglicanism, Presbyterianism, and Methodism. Topics discussed include the Council of Trent, the renewal of Catholicism in the 16th and 17th centuries, and the rise of religious orders founded by St. John of the Cross, St. Teresa of Avila, and St. Vincent de Paul.
Online
2005; 1998
16.

Sacred Space [electronic resource]: Art, Architecture, and the Role of the State

Roman, Gothic, Baroque, and Rococo religious art, along with Christian iconography, are examined as reflections of the religious and political attitudes of the periods in which they were created. This program also examines the role of the Christian Orthodox Church and the schism of 1054 that permanently divided its members. The degrees of reverence accorded to Mary as Christ's mother by Catholics and Protestants are compared.
Online
2005; 1998
17.

Sectarianism and Schism in Europe [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Part one of this program highlights the Great Schism. The Papacy's move to achieve political independence and the flowering of the Renaissance are presented as well-along with the violent opposition to the new papal politics and the humanism that was remaking God in man's image. Part two plots out the religious revolt sparked by the sale of indulgences, from Martin Luther's 95 Theses, to the Inquisition, to the Protestantism of John Calvin. The spread of the Catholic faith to Latin America by the Jesuits is also discussed.
Online
2007; 1999
18.

Paganism [electronic resource]

Since the dawn of humankind, people have wondered: Is there a sentient power within or beyond our world that is involved in our lives? This program examines the practice of paganism through important prehistoric sites such as the capstone dolmen Pentre Ifan, in Wales; the megaliths of Newgrange, in Ireland; some of the 3,000 standing stones at Carnac, in France; and the Altamira caves in northern Spain, with their remarkable examples of pagan rock art. In addition, a Dogon funeral dance in Mali exemplifies an indigenous religious ritual as it is performed today.
Online
2006; 2003
19.

Temple Priests and Civil Servants [electronic resource]

The mine and the palace compound show how life was lived for centuries in ancient Egypt, until faraway battles and changing weather created shortages and discontent. The program discusses the granite quarry; the construction of the mud-brick palace of the King; the temple, the relationship between pharaoh, gods, priests, and common people; the temple calendar; the average villager's diet; religious ceremonies, music, and dancing; the coming of drought, the decline in supplies, and the resultant outburst-the first sit-in in recorded history; and the beginnings of class divisions in the village.
Online
2005; 1984
20.

Testament [electronic resource]: Early Church and Jewish Diaspora

Using the book the Acts of the Apostles, this program traces the birth of Christianity to the development of the first Christian communities. Christian persecutions and the role of the catacombs as places of hiding and worship are discussed, along with the activities of the founders of the first synods, theologians Gregory of Nyssa, John Chrysostom, and Saint Augustine. An examination of the Jewish diaspora from ancient times to the present provides a valuable historical perspective on political events in Israel and the Middle East.
Online
2006; 1998