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61.

Medical Imaging [electronic resource]: X-Rays, CT, MRI, Ultrasound, and Virtual Reality

This comprehensive overview assesses a number of noninvasive ways to look inside the human body. Segment one addresses the limitations of X-ray and fluoroscopic technologies and introduces computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. Segment two describes how images are digitized and discusses the practical difficulties in achieving a clear image. Segment three demonstrates how computers can be used to enhance image definition. And segment four features two virtual reality programs that allow medical students to practice performing a craniotomy to remove a tumor and percutaneous rhizotomy to treat trigeminal neuralgia.
Online
2005; 2001
62.

Supercomputing [electronic resource]: Power of Visualization

Astonishing ways to share scientific data are emerging in the digital age. This program explores the phenomenal growth of supercomputing and its impact on medicine, oceanography, air traffic control, law enforcement, and other fields. Showcasing practical examples of dynamic visualization technology, the video looks at three-dimensional renderings of cities accurate to the square foot, medical imaging capabilities on the cellular level, and instantaneous collaboration between laboratories a hemisphere apart. Commentary by virtual reality pioneer Jaron Lanier and other innovators underscores the need to recognize the human factor in the age of supercomputers.
Online
2005
63.

Nocturnal GERD [electronic resource]

The chronic, potentially dangerous condition known as acid reflux-also called GERD, or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease-is hard to miss or ignore. One variety, however, often goes undetected. This program examines nocturnal GERD, which produces no daytime symptoms and may be tied to other sleep disorders. Outlining the factors that contribute to nocturnal GERD, including a high-fat diet and obesity, the program describes its warning signs, shows how physicians diagnose it, and presents a helpful case study. Expertise comes from Dr. Adam Elfant of Cooper University Hospital, Dr. Joseph Pisegna of the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, and Dr. Lee Hixson of Mountain West Gastroenterology.
Online
2009; 2007
64.

Preventing Eye Infections [electronic resource]

While some eye infections are common and treatable-such as conjunctivitis, or pinkeye-other infections are more serious and, in a matter of hours, can totally destroy a patient's eyesight. This program features case studies involving typical and extreme eye infections, explores ways to prevent and treat related complications, and looks at what's on the horizon related to eye infection research. Topics include the special care needed by seniors and contact lens wearers as well as infections that can result from cataract surgery. Expert commentary comes from Dr. Harry Flynn of the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Dr. Eric Donnenfeld, an ophthalmic consultant.
Online
2009; 2007
65.

Happier Women [electronic resource]: 25 Ways to Reduce Stress Video Clip Collection

Career issues, family crises, and medical problems can create an emotional overload. This collection of 25 video clips offers guidance, reassurance, and useful facts for busy women. With an average clip length of 90 seconds, the collection incorporates mini-case studies and commentary from experts - providing visual support for instructors and counselors who want to reach overworked, overscheduled learners. Topics cover health, parenting, business, and other areas.
Online
2009; 2008
66.

Babyland [electronic resource]: Infant Mortality in Memphis, TN

There are places in America where the infant mortality rate echoes that of a developing world country. This ABC News program travels to Memphis, Tennessee-epicenter of the nation's worst infant death statistics-to investigate the issue and explore possible solutions. Viewers visit a cemetery with the heartrending epithet "Babyland" and witness an unusual pairing between a black, teen mother-to-be and a white, suburban church volunteer trying to prevent another tragic outcome. Studying premature birth, the main factor behind infant mortality, the program also profiles Memphis residents dedicated to raising awareness of, and spurring action on, our healthcare system's most deplorable failing.
Online
2009; 2008
67.

The Truth About Flu Vaccines [electronic resource]

No one enjoys getting a flu shot, but most people realize they need to. Vaccination, however, is not only vital for the individual but also for the well-being of friends, coworkers, and loved ones. This program corrects myths and misconceptions concerning influenza vaccines and explains who is most at risk for flu-related complications. Viewers learn about disease progression, courses of treatment, yearly genetic mutation of the virus, WHO surveillance team functions, vaccine shortages and production methods, and high-risk groups targeted for inoculations. Experts include Dr. Kathryn Edwards of Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Dr. Neil Silverman, UCLA School of Medicine. Two case studies are included.
Online
2009; 2008
68.

Preventing a Stroke [electronic resource]

A major stroke can hit without warning and leave a broken body and a damaged mind in its wake. But there are ways to prevent strokes, even among high-risk groups. This program looks at anticoagulation and its role in averting strokes and other devastating conditions. Viewers learn how doctors identify risk factors in patients and how certain treatments can stop blood clots from forming and making their way to the brain. Subjects include ischemic strokes, intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages, blood clot formation, DVT, stroke symptoms, treatments by type of stroke, anti-thrombotic therapy, and telestroke. Commentary comes from Dr. Mark Alberts and Dr. Robert Bonow of Northwestern University.
Online
2009; 2008
69.

Food Poisoning [electronic resource]

Although the culprit behind food poisoning is often invisible to the eye, food-borne illnesses represent a colossal health issue spanning a wide range of problems and solutions. This program explores the causes of food contamination, the symptoms and ailments it produces, and the methods for preventing it. Viewers are introduced to bacteria, viruses, fungi, molds, and yeasts that threaten unsuspecting consumers, as well as dangerous cooking temperature ranges, proper time frames for food disposal, and common incubation periods for several microbe strains. Food allergens and non-microbial sources of contamination, such as pesticides and industrial waste, are also studied.
Online
2009; 2008
70.

Working With Incontinence in the Elderly [electronic resource]

Assisting elderly patients and aged-care facility residents to address their incontinence issues both effectively and with sensitivity is crucial to helping them maintain their dignity and independence. A thorough introduction to the subject of incontinence, this program discusses the four types-stress and urge, functional, overflow and enuresis, and fecal-while offering strategies for managing them.
Online
2009; 2008
71.

Assessing Skin Conditions in the Elderly [electronic resource]

After an overview of skin anatomy and physiology, this program describes the techniques necessary for making accurate assessments of elderly patients with new or ongoing skin conditions. The video also defines specialized terminology and suggests post-assessment courses of action. An intelligent and accessible look at the fundamentals of skin care for senior citizens.
Online
2009; 2008
72.

Emerging Diseases [electronic resource]: Prions and Viruses

In an increasingly global society, disease outbreaks are on the rise-and so is the need for epidemiology expertise. This program introduces students to vital information regarding the transmission, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, vectors, prevention, and control of several communicable diseases. Students receive vital information on zoonotic diseases such as SARS, Rift Valley fever, and avian influenza, including steps typically taken to manage and mitigate the spread of these illnesses. Creutzfeld-Jacob disease is also discussed. An experienced virology specialist discusses the science behind each of these diseases and current efforts to combat them.
Online
2009; 2008
73.

The Physics of Medical Imaging [electronic resource]

Medical imaging technologies-true marvels of medical science-give doctors the ability to analyze and interpret bodily anatomy and processes noninvasively. But how do ultrasound, hard and soft X-rays, CT scans, PET scans, and MRI scans create their remarkable images? This program thoroughly examines the physics of health-related imaging as it investigates the medical properties of electromagnetic and high-frequency sound waves. Detailed graphics appear throughout.
Online
2009; 2008
74.

Mesothelioma [electronic resource]: Hidden Threat

Prolonged exposure to asbestos-or, in some cases, even moderate contact-can lead to a devastating cancer called mesothelioma. This program examines the specific causes of the disease while presenting case studies involving a variety of patient experiences. Viewers learn how mesothelioma occurs when malignant cells form in the protective sac, or mesothelium, covering many internal organs. Dr. Harvey Paas of the NYU Langone Medical Center and Dr. John Costanzi of Lone Star Oncology Consultants explain diagnosis methods and newly developed treatments, while male and female patients describe the hazards that may have caused their cancers and what they are doing to survive and thrive.
Online
2009; 2008
75.

The Silent Killer [electronic resource]: SARS

February 21, 2003, was just a normal day at Hotel Metropole in Hong Kong - until a guest, infected with SARS, became patient zero for an epidemic that rapidly infected people in dozens of countries around the world. This program - part dramatization, part documentary - illustrates how the SARS virus spread and was gradually contained. In addition, virology experts shed light on topics ranging from the relationship between a defect in the CCR5 gene and viruses such as HIV and bubonic plague; to the resurrection of an extinct retrovirus in order to learn how, long ago, the human immune system defeated it; to the connection between H1N1 Spanish flu and H5N1 avian flu.
Online
2009; 2008
76.

The Invisible Enemy [electronic resource]: Weaponized Smallpox

Smallpox has officially been eradicated worldwide - but the destruction of lab cultures in government-sponsored biowar facilities was never monitored. A blend of dramatization and documentary, this program considers the weaponization and deployment of smallpox - or, by extension, any lethal virus - from preexisting stockpiles and by laboratory manufacture from mail order genetic material and online genome maps. The culturing of as-yet-unnamed animal viruses that are potentially capable of jumping the animal/human genetic boundary is also addressed. A harrowing what-if scenario of bioterror combined with cutting-edge virology.
Online
2009; 2008
77.

Fantastic Voyage [electronic resource]: Nanotechnology and Space-Age Medicine

Given the limits of today's medical technology, a three-year trip to Mars would place astronauts in grave danger. Thus, NASA has divided its attention between outer and inner space, aiming to create self-sufficient nanomedicine by the year 2020. This program studies health care research driven by that goal. With exciting animation sequences and conversations with top-level experts, the video introduces microbivores, respirocytes, dendrimers, and other innovations designed to search out and destroy diseases in the earliest stages. Interviews feature NASA scientists Dr. Kathie Olsen and John Hines; nanotech pioneers Dr. Ralph Merkle and Dr. Carlo Montemagno; and cancer expert Dr. Carol Dahl.
Online
2009; 2002
78.

The Secret of Genes [electronic resource]

Longevity may or may not come from one's family tree-but with the help of science, could it one day be "inserted" into our genes? This program looks at research in genetic modification that might help extend human life spans. Spotlighting recent DNA experiments on the C. elegans worm, the program also describes longevity studies in mice, mollusks, and fungi-all of which shed light on possibilities for genetic alteration in humans. Students will learn about the roles played by mitochondria and free radicals while the genetic implications of diet and metabolism are also explored. Conclusions based on studies of Okinawan populations and the Biosphere 2 venture of the early 1990s are featured.
Online
2009; 2005
79.

Rays of Hope for the Brain [electronic resource]

How well do we understand the neurology of learning? Why does the brain's ability to learn diminish as we age? Can science find a way to extend brain "fitness," even for the very old? This program addresses those questions as it describes important medical experiments and studies. Topics include the central role of nerve cell connections in learning and cognitive development; cerebral plasticity, or the breakdown of unused connections; and growing evidence that plaque, diet, and poor blood circulation all "age" the brain. Tests at Germany's Max Planck Institute and the University of Zurich highlight comparisons between healthy and Alzheimer-afflicted brains while assessing the potential for an Alzheimer's vaccine.
Online
2009; 2005
80.

The Beauty and Burden of Hormones [electronic resource]

Are exercise and smart eating the best tools for staying youthful and attractive? Or is there a third ingredient in the fountain of youth-namely, clinical adjustments to the body's chemistry, perhaps with drugs derived from other creatures' hormones? This program examines the subject of hormone therapy and its link to longevity studies. Outlining the role hormones play in sexual attraction, the program describes the biological aspects of menopause; explains the use of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, or SNP, in treating testosterone decline; and shows how the use of horse estrogen has been discredited as a weapon against female aging. Research into soya and phytoestrogens is also featured.
Online
2010; 2005