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1.

The Medical Imaging Revolution [electronic resource]

With advances in genetics and pharmacology capturing much of the public's attention, it's easy to overlook another rapidly evolving area of health science: medical imaging. This program fully explores that topic, spotlighting technologies which enable doctors to visually render the body's interior at an astonishing level of detail. New possibilities for surgical precision are also featured. Filmed at French facilities on the leading edge of the global wave of medical imaging innovation, the video illustrates the benefits of MRI and PET scan technology in diagnosing trauma-related injuries, breast cancer, prenatal and infant health problems, and potential heart attacks. Endoscopic procedures for detecting intestinal and colon cancers, including an orally administered video capsule, ar [...]
Online
2010; 2005
2.

Sinusitis [electronic resource]

Although sinusitis affects some 30 million Americans each year, its frequent appearance alongside the common cold can make for a difficult diagnosis. This program illustrates the causes of sinusitis, assesses various treatments for it, and highlights two sinusitis case studies. Viewers discover how pollution, allergies, and dehydration are all linked to the ailment and how it presents as an infection blocking the sinus passages. Also discussed are the differences between acute, subacute, and chronic sinusitis, as well as the treatment options now available, including saline and steroid sprays, antibiotics, and endoscopic surgery. Expert commentary comes from Dr. Thomas Troost of the Washington ENT Group; Dr. Suzette Mikula of Georgetown University Hospital; and Dr. Harvey Plasse, coa [...]
Online
2009; 2007
3.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome [electronic resource]

Sometimes, the normal aches and pains of the aging process can indicate a more serious underlying medical condition. This program focuses on the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of one such condition: carpal tunnel syndrome. Host Dr. Kevin Soden discusses how CTS arises and its diagnosis with hand surgeon Ken Means, while physical therapist Steve Moxie explains the various treatment options for patients diagnosed with the disorder. The patient's point of view is provided through two senior citizens who underwent laparoscopic surgery to ease the chronic hand pain caused by the syndrome. Although serious at any age, CTS is highly treatable.
Online
2009; 2007
4.

Taste and Smell Disorders [electronic resource]

Most people lose some olfactory sense as they approach old age, but the problem can also impact the lives of young or middle-aged adults and require extensive medical treatment. This program examines the causes of smell and taste loss, surveys various treatments for it, and presents several case studies of the unhappy condition. Viewers learn about the basic functions of the olfactory nerve; the various types of smell and taste loss, including phantosmia, or hallucinated smells; and the array of diagnostic and treatment options available-from a clinical scratch-and-sniff test to endoscopic surgery. Expert guests include Dr. Eric Holbrook, a sinus surgeon and Harvard Medical School professor; Dr. Alan Hirsch, neurological director at Chicago's Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foun [...]
Online
2009; 2007
5.

The Male Reproductive Organs [electronic resource]

With her trademark no-nonsense style, Dr. Alice Roberts explains in this episode how the male anatomy works and offers practical advice on how to keep it healthy. She is joined by 30-year-old Mark Smallman, who realizes he knows very little about his own body. Mark's education begins in the lab, with Dr. Roberts dissecting a male pig's reproductive organs and getting Mark to cut through a testicle. Although testicular cancer is uncommon, Mark, at under 40, is in the age group most at risk. He also is told how to self-examine for lumps by urologist Alan Doherty, who carries out a pioneering operation (filmed in the program) on a prostate cancer patient.
Online
2008
6.

The Female Reproductive Organs [electronic resource]

Dr. Alice Roberts continues her explanation of our reproductive systems, in this episode looking at the female sexual organs. Using an MRI scanner on her own body, she demonstrates how everything fits together-possibly a first for a television presenter. Using her trademark dissections of animal parts, drawings, and props, Dr. Roberts explains the female reproductive organs. Thousands of chocolate mini eggs help to demonstrate the huge number of eggs a baby girl is born with and how they immediately start disintegrating. There is also advice on how to become "breast aware," on the importance of protecting oneself from sexually transmitted infections, and on the value of smear tests for fighting cervical cancer.
Online
2008
7.

Ear, Nose, and Throat [electronic resource]

Our ears, nose, and throat are all situated close together in the skull, but each has a different function. In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts shows viewers the tiny bones in the ear called the ossicles. It's clear that our ears are very intricate and vulnerable to damage. She then explains that loud noise can cause permanent harm to our ears. Every time you leave a nightclub or concert with ringing in the ears, you have to some extent damaged your hearing, so it is very important to provide protection. Dr. Roberts points out that the ears have a vital role to play in balance and also explains some of the roles of the nose and the throat.
Online
2008
8.

The Immune System: Series 2 [electronic resource]

The immune system is the body's defense from attack - whether from viruses like influenza or unwanted bacteria. In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts explains how it works and what happens when it goes wrong. She also takes part in a stunt guaranteed to scare her, so the scientific effects on her immune system can be observed. Immunologist Josh Bosch compares blood samples taken before and after Dr. Roberts was terrorized. They show that her infection-fighting white blood cells were raised fivefold in a stress response resulting from her experience. Using all the means at her disposal (dissections, drawings, paintball guns, even cakes), Dr. Roberts explains the fantastic complexity of our immune system.
Online
2008
9.

The Liver: Series 2 [electronic resource]

It was thought that only alcoholics got cirrhosis of the liver, but doctors now realize that this is not necessarily the case, and that our genes and other aspects of our lifestyles all play their part in damaging the organ. This episode follows the story of Philip Parker, who is on the waiting list for a liver transplant. Surgeons are filmed replacing his liver. Dr. Alice Roberts also visits scientists at Newcastle University who hope to be able to grow replacement livers from stem cells obtained from a baby's umbilical cord. Although the liver has the ability to regenerate, with liver disease on the increase both from alcohol and other causes, this is an organ in peril.
Online
2008
10.

The Stomach and Intestines: Series 2 [electronic resource]

In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts uses dissection, drawing, and some unusual tests to reveal where the stomach and intestines are, how big they are, and how best to look after them. Dr. Roberts is joined by Lesley Love, a 40-year-old estate agent whose diet is based almost entirely on chocolate and cheese. The doctor embarks on a mission to impress upon her the need for more fruit and vegetables. She reveals that it is normal to defecate as seldom as once every three days or as often as three times a day. It is important to be aware of one's bowel habits and take notice of any changes, as these can be signs of bowel cancer.
Online
2008
11.

Kidneys [electronic resource]

In this tour of the human body, Dr. Alice Roberts introduces viewers to the key organs. She dissects animal organs - similar in form and function to human ones - and explains how we can hold on to our health and live to a ripe old age. Dr. Roberts puts three rugby players through their paces to find out how their kidneys cope under the stress of dehydration; and June, who has been in dialysis for four years, speaks from her own experience with failing kidneys. Her sister, Lorraine, offers her own kidney, and when it is found to be a match, the program follows the live kidney transplant operation.
Online
2007
12.

Heart [electronic resource]

The heart is a hardworking organ that makes sure every muscle, tissue, and cell in the body gets just what it needs. In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts puts her own heart to the test when she rides in a stunt plane performing acrobatics. She discovers what happens to her heart rate under stress. When she's back on the ground, she visits a pub and a chip shop to analyze what happens to her heart when she's drinking alcohol and eating chips. She finds out why a couple of alcoholic drinks are good for the heart and sees for herself just how greasy fat from chips looks when it enters her bloodstream.
Online
2007
13.

Lungs [electronic resource]

In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts uses shock tactics to make one confirmed smoker realize how much she's damaging her lungs. On a night in the pub, Lisa can easily binge smoke her way through 40 cigarettes. She gets out of breath quickly and knows that quitting cigarettes will give her more endurance. She meets Dr. Roberts in the laboratory, where they dissect a set of pig's lungs (very similar to human lungs) to discover just how they work. They also watch an operation carried out on a 56-year-old smoker, who has a cancerous tumor on her lungs. Lisa realizes this is exactly what she could be facing if she doesn't give up her habit.
Online
2007
14.

Eyes [electronic resource]

Dr. Alice Roberts undergoes a thorough eye examination in this episode of her tour of the body's major organs. She puts her own body to the test, beginning with a 250-foot climb up a sheer cliff face - blindfolded. She also meets Sarah, who has a family history of eye problems, and sets out to discover if her computer- and TV-dependent lifestyle is affecting her sight. In addition, Dr. Roberts investigates whether carrots really are good for the eyes and whether the sunglasses available today offer enough protection from sun damage. She also checks out the pros and cons of modern laser eye surgery, and gets a firsthand account of living with vision impairment.
Online
2007
15.

Skin [electronic resource]

The body's largest organ - the skin - comes under close scrutiny in this episode. Dr. Alice Roberts puts her own skin through a series of tests, weathering temperature extremes and undergoing a computer program that shows what she will look like at the age of 80. She also looks into the thousands of wrinkle creams available today to determine whether they are helpful and meets a 22-year-old farmer who exposes his skin to the hazards of the elements on a daily basis. She puts his skin under the microscope to find out just how much it is damaged. The program also features a farmer's wife in her sixties, who has a cancerous growth removed.
Online
2007