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2.

Spies of Mississippi [electronic resource]

In the spring of 1964, the civil rights community is gearing up for "Mississippi Freedom Summer," during which hundreds, if not thousands, of mostly white student activists from the North will link up with mostly black freedom workers to accomplish what the Mississippi power structure fears the most: registering black people to vote. For the segregationists, Freedom Summer is nothing less than a declaration of war. The state responds by swearing in hundreds of new deputies, stockpiling tear gas and riot gear, and preparing the jails for an influx of summer "guests." But the most powerful men in the state have another weapon to fight integration. They have quietly created a secret, state-funded spy agency, the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission, answering directly to the Governo [...]
Online
2014; 2013
3.

Fighting Back 1957-1962 [electronic resource]

States' rights loyalists and federal authorities collide in the 1957 battle to integrate Little Rock's Central High School, and again in James Meredith's 1962 challenge to segregation at the University of Mississippi. Both times, a Southern governor squares off with a U.S. president, violence erupts-and integration is carried out.
Online
2014; 1994
4.

Mississippi-Is This America? 1963-1964 [electronic resource]

Mississippi's grass-roots civil rights movement becomes an American concern when college students travel south to help register black voters and three activists are murdered. The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party challenges the regular Mississippi delegation at the Democratic Convention in Atlantic City.
Online
2014; 1994
5.

Inside the New KKK [electronic resource]

Granted rare access to the Mississippi White Nights of the KKK-the klavern notorious for its involvement in what has come to be known as the Mississippi Burning case-this ABC News program reports on the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, whose membership has been rising. Nightline's Cynthia McFadden and her camera crew are welcomed by Grand Dragon Steven Howard, who, at a site deep in the woods, presides over a white supremacist barbecue, some pistol practice, and, after nightfall, the ritual lighting of a 16-foot cross. In addition, the Grand Dragon expounds his controversial views on racial segregation and the means for achieving it. "Howard says he's allowed us to come here to show us the new Klan is neither hate-filled nor violent," says McFadden, "yet what we heard and saw during o [...]
Online
2012
6.

Dignity Harbor [electronic resource]

Dignity Harbor chronicles a group of homeless people living in an encampment along the Mississippi River in downtown St. Louis. In the shadow of the Arch, several makeshift communities - Hopeville, Sparta, and Dignity Harbor - are erected when work begins to fill the tunnels under Tucker Boulevard, displacing many homeless. In Dignity Harbor, the self-appointed mayor promises a safe environment - women are especially to be welcomed - and the residents work cooperatively to cut wood and build rudimentary shelters. But conflicts inevitably arise, tempers occasionally flare, and everyone struggles to survive the harsh St. Louis winter. Although the utopian dream finally dies for good when the city bulldozes the shantytowns, not all is lost, with several of the residents moving to more p [...]
Online
2012
7.

The Siege of Vicksburg

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Online
2008
8.

Mississippi, America [electronic resource]: Legal Battles of the Freedom Summer

In the summer of 1964, a handful of Mississippi attorneys issued a nationwide call for assistance as they struggled to defend imprisoned civil rights activists. This classic documentary examines the work of local and out-of-state lawyers who answered the call. Through archival footage and riveting eyewitness accounts, the film illuminates the legal dimensions of the frontline battle for African Americans' right to vote. Interviewees include civil rights attorney William Kunstler; U.S. Congressman and former SNCC activist John Lewis (D-Georgia); National Lawyers Guild Mississippi Project director George Crockett; and Dr. Aaron Henry, former Mississippi NAACP president.
Online
2008; 1995
9.

Mississippi Son [electronic resource]: A Filmmaker's Journey Home

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Tells the heartwrenching and heartwarming stories that tells the stories of the people, the culture and the future in the wake of Hurricane Karina. Filmmaker Don Wilson returns home to talk to those who lived through the hurricane.
Online
2007
10.

Freedom Summer

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Online
2006
11.

Fatal Flood [electronic resource]

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In the spring of 1927, after weeks of incessant rains, the Mississippi River went on a rampage from Cairo, Illinois, to New Orleans, inundating hundreds of towns, killing as many as a thousand people and leaving a million homeless. In Greenville, Mississippi, efforts to contain the river pitted the majority black population against an aristocratic plantation family, the Percys-- and the Percys against themselves.
Online
2005; 2001
12.

The Murder of Emmett Till [electronic resource]

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The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began.
Online
2005; 2003
14.

How to Become Sheriff ... When Born Poor and Black in Segregated Mississippi

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For two centuries, Mississippi blacks have had to endure slavery, poverty, discrimination, and violence. Finally in the 1960s, the civil rights campaign in the South brought real change. Mississippi now has thirteen elected black sheriffs. This film tells the story of one of them: Sheriff Frank Davis and how he gained acceptance by the community of Port Gibson as its major law enforcer. Frank was one of eleven children of Mary Triplett, whose mother and grandmother had been victims of Jim Crow. Mary could not vote or eat in a restaurant of work as a clerk in a store. His father was a mechanic and although they never missed a meal, the Tripletts were very poor, attended segregated schools and lived in shabby houses on unpaved streets. In 1965, the Port Gibson branch of the NAACP organ [...]
Online
2002
15.

Standing Tall: Women Unionize the Catfish Industry

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The boom in Mississippi catfish farming, in the 1980s, required processing plants and hundreds of workers. The mostly black female workforce had to work, in noisy and wet factories for minimum wage, without any benefits, bathroom breaks or recourse if a worker was mistreated. The Mississippi Delta, at the time, was notoriously poor, neglected, and resistant to change. This historical documentary chronicles the risky and difficult effort of a few women working at Delta Pride Catfish to organize a United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) local 1529 at their plant. The 1986 union election victory surprised many locals, especially management at Delta Pride. In 1990, the workers at Delta Pride struck for two months and won better wages and working conditions. The strike established local [...]
Online
2001
16.

Delta Jews

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For over a century, the largely rural region of the Mississippi delta has been home to a thriving Jewish community, rooted generations-deep in its rich soil. Jews became an integral part of delta life, forging a hybrid identity that was deeply Jewish and distinctively Southern. Their numbers have dwindled in recent years, but a small number of Jews have stayed on, determined to maintain a Jewish presence against all odds. Through the eyes of those who remain, Delta Jews traces the history of the community and its relationship to its white Christian and black neighbors. We meet families who as merchants and farmers have taken on many characteristic speech patterns and social attitudes of their neighbors. Yet the families maintained their traditions, even if it took importing rabbis an [...]
Online
2000
17.

The Battle and Siege of Vicksburg

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Online
2000
18.

Mississippi: Power of Place

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The culture of the South nourishes its artists through close family ties, religion, music and a strong sense of history. Mississippi, for example, has always been known for its rich literary and brilliant musical heritage even though it also has the highest illiteracy rate of any state. It has been the home of William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Tennessee Williams, and Muddy Waters. Today, a new generation of artists is emerging from this place that some say embodies the best of American culture, despite poverty and social ills. Through the artists profiled in this film, we see how the spirit of place inspires their creativity. These artists represent different racial, educational, and socio-economic backgrounds. Barry Hannah is considered the "most outrageous writer of the contemporary [...]
Online
1998
19.

Freedom Summer [electronic resource]

On June 21, 1964, civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner were murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi. A watershed moment in the movement for equality between blacks and whites, the young men's disappearance riveted the nation. This program confronts the ugly reality of racist violence in the South during those troubled times and the sequence of events that ultimately spurred Congress and President Johnson to enact the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Online
1996
20.

Mississippi Catfish [electronic resource]: Blues Musician

In this classic program, Mississippi Catfish - one of the last of the authentic rural blues players - recounts key episodes from his life. Archival photographs, combined with Catfish's anecdotes, provide a strong sense of black life in rural Mississippi, especially during the 1920s and 30s, offering a cultural framework for the blues and an intimate portrait of a genuine blues musician.
Online
1996