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141.

Artisan Cheeses of the USA [electronic resource]

In this episode, host Will Studd travels across America and finds artisanal cheese regions not normally associated with specialist cheese. First he learns about the challenges of making farmstead washed-rind cheese in Virginia, and then he's on to Zingerman's Creamery in Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Indiana, American goat cheese pioneer Judy Schad of Capriole dairy encourages Will to enjoy Bourbon in a new way. Saxelby Cheesemongers' stall at New York's public market is up next, and finally, Oregon where he discovers the fascinating story behind Rogue River Blue, one of the oldest raw milk blue cheeses in the country.
Online
2009
142.

Poverty [electronic resource]: The Fourth World

In an endless landscape of garbage, hundreds of people fight with crows over the edible contents of the trash. Hungry children stare from the door of a shack. A man labors under the weight of a bucket of water on a muddy street lined by low, crowded dwellings. What are the human stories behind these images of the Fourth World? Traveling to Nairobi, Guatemala City, and Manila, this documentary brings viewers inside the world's shantytowns, exploring the reasons for their rapid expansion and revealing the personal struggles of those who live there.
Online
2012
143.

Africa [electronic resource]: A Journey Through Hell

Every year, thousands of people fleeing poverty in Ethiopia and Somalia hire smugglers to ferry them across the Gulf of Aden to look for work, but nearly half don't survive the three-day passage. Journalist Daniel Grandclément boarded a 30-foot boat with 120 refugees and shared their journey through hell - with the understanding that the smugglers would kill him if he pointed the lens in their direction - to learn more about the plight of these migrants. The trip is made without food or water, and with constant beatings by the smugglers, who sometimes simply toss people overboard to drown. The situation is so dire that international aid agencies are camped out on the Somali coast, offering to pay the refugees to go back home. Few take them up on their offer.
Online
2007
144.

Scotland [electronic resource]: Artisan Cheeses From the Highlands and Islands

Scotland is not the first country that come to mind when you think of cheese-making, but in the rugged rolling highlands, Will Studd unearths an ancient sour cream 'chieftains' cheese called Caboc. Then he enjoys some Strathdowne blue with oatcakes, and finds out how the cheese also matches with single malt whisky. Next Will is off to the Isle of Mull where an enterprising family, supplement the feed for their cows with whisky mash during the cold winter months.
Online
2010
145.

Sicily [electronic resource]: Traditional Flavoured Pecorino Cheeses

As the largest island in the Mediterranean, the culture of Sicily has been influenced by the Greeks, Romans, Arabs and Normans - and of course the Italians. These influences can clearly be seen in the traditional cheese-making process. Host Will Studd travels to Sicily and visits one of the last farmhouse dairies making a saffron-flavored sheep's milk cheese. He also samples the many flavors of Sicilian Pecorino, and explores a Dickensian cheese-maturing room that is several centuries behind the times.
Online
2010
146.

Southeast France [electronic resource]: Traditional Cheeses of Provence

Will Studd travels to Provence in the South East of France and discovers Banon, a traditional benchmark goat's milk cheese wrapped in dried chestnut leaves, and a rare cheese called Brousse du Rove. He then drives from Provence to the Vercors plateau, where he leans about St Marcellin and an extraordinary, small dried goat cheese whose name literally means ' the feet of god'.
Online
2010
147.

Spain [electronic resource]: The Catalonian Cheese Revolution

The past two decades have seen an extraordinary revolution in Spanish cuisine, mostly from Catalan chefs. The region has also led a renaissance in artisan cheese making which virtually disappeared in the Franco era. Will Studd visits the beautiful city of Barcelona where he meets author Eric Canut. The hills outside the city hold the secret to the revival of Catalan cheeses; from the traditional Mato and Tupi, to the newcomer Garrotxa. Next, several chefs demonstrate ways to use the local cheeses in traditional Catalonian dishes. Then it's off to Manorca, the island of cheese, to see how the traditional Mahon cheese is produced.
Online
2012
148.

Switzerland [electronic resource]: Mountain Cheese

Switzerland is famous for producing the finest mountain cheeses in the world, and three quarters of these are still made with raw milk. Host Will Studd samples Raclette and learns how it's made over a wood fire. Then he's off to the picturesque town of Gruyere to trace the origins of a cheese whose name literally means 'head monk'. A meeting with the king of Swiss cheese, Emmanthaler, finally answers the age old question; how does it get those holes?
Online
2006
149.

Tasmania [electronic resource]: The New Cheese Pioneers

In this episode, host Will Studd again teams up wit renowned Australian chef Tetsuya Wakuda for a tour of Tasmania, and to demonstrate a few of his unusual recipe ideas with the local dairy and produce. On their travels, the pair meets with some artisan cheese makers who have proudly put the country back on the map. Some of the recipes include Bruny Island cheese and wood-fired oysters, artisan cider produced from heritage apples, handmade cultured butter from Elgaar Farm, John Bignell's blue cheese and leatherwood honey, King Island cream and lobster, and even a Wasabi flavored cheese.
Online
2010
150.

The Champion of English Cheese [electronic resource]

In this episode, host Will Studd visits influential cheese retailer Neal's Yard Dairy in London, where cheese champion Randolph Hodgson explains how traditional English farmhouse cheese was saved from extinction. Will then looks at how these cheeses are made when he travels to the Midlands, Lancashire, Cheshire and Wensleydale, made famous by Wallace and Gromitt. Finally, he looks at the controversial raw milk blue cheese call Stichelton, and how its success may change the way Stilton is mode.
Online
2009
151.

Turkey [electronic resource]: The Traditional Cheeses of Turkey

The Republic of Turkey is the crossroads of Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and one the legacies of its history of invasion is a variety of regional cheeses that are rarely found outside the country. Will Studd visits the ancient spice markets of Istanbul, Canakkal to learn about this country's most popular marinated cheeses Azine Peynir, and a hard cheese called Mahalic. In the Anatolia region of the country he visits a small dairy near Kars where he gets a lesson in making the rare blue string cheese, and finds Tulum, the traditional cheese aged in animal skins.
Online
2012
152.

Twins of the Mediterranean [electronic resource]: Corsica and Sardinia

Despite their close proximity to each other, Mediterranean Islands Corsica and Sardinia have distinctly different cheese traditions. Corsica is renowned for its soft sheep's milk cheese, Brocciu, but there is also Sartinese which is made with either sheep's or goat's milk, but then is left to age so that maggots can "whip" the texture. A short ferry ride to Sardinia and Will discovers the ancient curd cheese matured in a goat's stomach. Finally there is the authentic Sardinian Pecorino Sardo, hand made by shepherds and then smoked over an open fire.
Online
2009
153.

Big Noise Dispatches No. 5

Dispatches No. 5 provides groundbreaking anti-propaganda news from the Middle East to the American Midwest.
Online
2017; 2010
154.

Italy

Finally, our journey must come to an end in Italy, a country once made rich from its maritime trade. Our final voyage begins in Venice, the birthplace of merchants like Marco Polo, whose exotic tales from the east strengthened trade all those centuries ago. Sumnima Udas visits the MOSE project, Libreria Acqua Alta, Mantero silk factory, and the World's Expo on this episode of Silk Road: Past, Present, Future.
Online
2019; 2015
155.

The Viking Trade: An Unlikely Relationship

"The Vikings" conjures up images of fierce warriors with horned helmets who ruled the seas and raided towns. However, unknown to many, the Vikings were the international tradesmen of their time. In Constantinople or modern day Istanbul, they traded silk and gold. Sumnima Udas visits an archeologists and a ship reconstruction expert in Roskilde, explores using innovative technology for modern shipping routes, and examines the lucrative amber trade on this episode of Silk Road: Past, Present, Future.
Online
2019; 2016
156.

Ecuador [electronic resource]: Divided Over Oil

This program contrasts indigenous, community-based culture with market economics driven by multinational corporations. The film assesses the growing conflict between Burlington Resources, an American oil company licensed to prospect in regions of Ecuador, and the self-sufficient Achuar people of that country, who believe the oil industry will destroy their environment and non-materialistic way of life. Underscoring the Ecuadorian government's tendency to accommodate U.S. interests, the video portrays a country divided by incompatible definitions of wealth and happiness.
Online
2006; 2004
157.

Northwest Contrast [electronic resource]

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Program 7.1 documents the challenges that face the port city of St. Petersburg's in post-Soviet society. Program 7.2 documents the privatization of previously state-owned collective farms in the Russian Federation.
Online
2003
158.

Joanna Lumley's Silk Road, Georgia and Azerbaijan

Joanna continues her adventure following the ancient Silk Road from the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea, across the rapidly changing post-Soviet states of Georgia and Azerbaijan. Joanna kicks off her journey in the brash, booming seaside resort of Batumi, where post-Soviet era new money has seen casinos and high-rise hotels built alongside old Soviet tenement blocks. It's a huge change from when it was a small backwater and the border to Turkey was closed.
Online
2019; 2018
159.

Joanna Lumley's Silk Road, Venice, Albania, and Turkey

Joanna starts her adventure in Venice, the European terminus of the Silk Road where she discovers how the Silk Road helped the merchants of Venice and the city state itself grow rich and powerful. Joanna witnesses first hand evidence of Marco Polo's silk road booty, and sees how that all-important commodity, silk, cemented Venice's reputation as a centre of luxury and conspicuous wealth.
Online
2019; 2018
160.

Joanna Lumley's Silk Road, Iran

Joanna continues her adventure following the ancient Silk Road across the Islamic Republic of Iran, home to one of the oldest civilizations on earth. A land of incredible diversity and phenomenal beauty, Iran was once the thriving heart of the mighty Persian Empire, but nowadays it's little visited by Westerners, and somewhat misunderstood. Joanna's Persian odyssey begins in Iran's capital Tehran, home to 15 million people. Politically and socially, it is Iran's cutting edge. Joanna goes headscarf shopping and visits the Golestan Palace, the opulent home of the Qajar dynasty who ruled Iran until the revolution of 1979. It's a symbol of the power and sophistication of the Persian Empire that helped make this part of the world a Silk Road fulcrum.
Online
2019; 2018