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61.

Bitter Harvest [electronic resource]: War on Drugs Meets War on Terror

For many governments in the new political landscape of Central Asia, supporting America's war on terror translates into a dangerous internal juggling act. This Wide Angle documentary examines the uneasy relationship between forces aligned against the Taliban and the drug lords who control the cultivation of much of the world's heroin. With militias and tribal factions diluting centralized power, the current opium crop in Afghanistan is among the largest ever. How will the international community deal with this fact of central Asian life? Can agricultural reforms be implemented that will equal the profitability of the opium trade? And how will the United States resolve a dilemma that pits the war on terror against the war on drugs? In addition, UNDP Administrator Mark Malloch Brown ta [...]
Online
2006; 2002
62.

The Cotton Wars [electronic resource]

For centuries, cotton has influenced the relationship between America and Africa. It drove the slave trade, and today it epitomizes the uneven playing field created by farming subsidies. This program examines the lopsided nature of the global cotton industry-in which U.S. and European producers enjoy massive government support while independent African farmers struggle to remain competitive. Going deep inside the agricultural, bureaucratic, and diplomatic networks that control the cotton trade on both sides of the Atlantic, the program also looks at the growing influence of Chinese producers-another factor working against Africa.
Online
2006; 2005
63.

Through a Child's Eyes [electronic resource]: Views of Global Poverty

Most elementary-age children exude innocence and optimism. What about kids who face extreme poverty? This documentary focuses on the plight of underprivileged nine-year-olds across the world-revealing their hardships and challenges as well as the light-hearted spirit they often exhibit in spite of their surroundings. Traveling to Egypt, Rwanda, India, Cambodia, Romania, Brazil, and New York City, the film presents a case study of a child in each location through compelling interviews, tours of struggling schools, and visits to barely livable homes. In every segment, the most illuminating moment follows the question, "What would you do if you had a lot of money?
Online
2007; 2006
64.

Angola [electronic resource]: Curse of Oil

Poverty in Africa reminds us that abundant natural resources don't automatically translate into widespread economic wealth. This program brings home the disturbing reality of daily life in Angola-marked by ramshackle houses, open sewers, and a question that grows louder every day: who benefits from the country's vast oil resources? Outlining the nation's colonial and Cold War traumas, the film examines the civil war between MPLA and UNITA forces and the present-day mismanagement of oil revenues stemming from that conflict. Related topics include China's growing role in the country, the tragedy of child hunger and malnutrition, and Angola's widespread problem of land mine injuries.
Online
2009; 2008
65.

Bolivia [electronic resource]: Partners, Not Masters

Swept to power in 2006 on a wave of social unrest, Bolivian President Evo Morales has vowed to shift the balance of power in favor of his poorest constituents. This program examines the wealth generated from Bolivia's natural resources-precious metals in particular-and highlights Morales' efforts to redirect revenues away from what he sees as neoliberal interests. Noting Morales' indigenous heritage, the film explores the meanings behind his motto "Partners not Masters" and his views on the influence of multinational corporations. It also reveals an ongoing struggle for equality among laborers at the Potosi silver mine, where male workers often die young-leaving widows and children to subsist in refuse.
Online
2009; 2008
66.

Tuvalu [electronic resource]: Keeping Heads Above Water

Scientists expect the island nation of Tuvalu to disappear into the sea during the next few decades. If that is true, what will become of the country's citizens and its unique South Pacific culture? Should the traumatic task of evacuation begin now, and if so, to where and under what circumstances? This program grapples with those questions by interviewing key figures in Tuvalu's government and populace while presenting compelling scenes of the ongoing environmental calamity. Centered on the main island of Funafuti, the film explores the growing significance of climate change issues in Tuvaluan political life and examines plant species that are dying off due to encroaching sea water-leading to more land erosion.
Online
2009; 2008
67.

Dubai [electronic resource]: City of Money and Mystery

It has the tallest building in the world, the biggest shopping mall on earth, and economic growth rivaling China's. This CNBC Original documentary takes viewers to Dubai, a Persian Gulf city with huge business and investment opportunities-many of which have nothing to do with oil. With insight from American corporate leaders, including J. W. Marriott Jr. and GE's CEO Jeffrey Immelt, the program features commentary from Mohamed Ali Alabbar, chairman of construction and real estate giant Emaar, and Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, chairman of Dubai World and perhaps the region's most important businessman. Thoughts from American expatriates shed further light on the depth, strength, and diversity of Dubai's economy.
Online
2009; 2008
68.

Addicted to Cheap Shopping? [electronic resource]: Why the Real Cost of Goods Keeps Going Down

In this program, host Libby Potter travels around the world as she takes a meaningful look at the economics behind the inexpensive goods for sale in big-box stores and malls. Cost-cutting through supply chain management and waste reduction, economies of scale achieved by shipping offshore-manufactured goods to market via super-container ships, the Wal-Mart effect, and the no-frills philosophy of IKEA are addressed. The triumphs and woes of China, in its role as manufacturer for the world, is given special attention, and the clothing industry is presented as a case study of the cheap goods cycle. But the program also considers the hidden societal costs of cheap goods, such as sweatshop labor and the environmental impact of cavalier overconsumption, and questions how much longer prices [...]
Online
2008; 2007
69.

Coca [electronic resource]: New Leaf of Life

A seldom-discussed dimension of the war on drugs is the plight of impoverished farmers in the developing world. This program tells the story of Peru's struggling cocaleros, whose livelihoods and ancient agricultural traditions have become a casualty of antidrug policies. Shot on the steep hillsides where Peruvian growers have produced the crop since pre-Columbian times, as well as in villages and town halls where a movement to protect their way of life is gathering momentum, the film interviews several self-described peasants who predict a dark future for their fragile economy. Global drug policy scholar Ricardo Soberon and legal coca grower Genaro Cahuana offer expert commentary.
Online
2008; 2007
70.

A World Apart [electronic resource]: Global Inequality and Its Consequences

A growing number of environmentalists, ethicists, and economists believe that the needs of the "have-nots" will one day become too powerful to ignore. This program highlights that viewpoint, illustrating vast disparities between the living standards of developed and underdeveloped nations and questioning the wisdom of looking the other way. Deconstructing conventional economic notions of production and consumption, the film examines the role of Western corporations in environmental problems-such as deforestation, destructive mining, and land mine infestation in Africa, Asia, and South America. These problems are linked to global economic issues, such as lack of access to capital markets and dependence on foreign aid.
Online
2008; 2007
71.

Food for All [electronic resource]: Global Agriculture and the Developing World

Satisfying one's hunger is a primal act which most Westerners never connect to global issues. But the diets and farming systems of wealthy countries can be directly linked to starvation in the underdeveloped world. This program sheds light on the international tragedy of hunger and malnutrition, emphasizing that the problem is one of distribution, not production. Filmed in Asia, South America, and sub-Saharan Africa, the film shows how geopolitics, economic isolation, regional conflicts, and lack of infrastructure render poor countries unable to feed their own people. Biotechnology, land use priorities, government corruption, the fast food industry, and the vicious cycle of child hunger are all featured topics. Contains scenes of breastfeeding.
Online
2008; 2007
72.

Global Hunger [electronic resource]

The head of the UN's world food program says "a perfect storm" is hitting hungry people around the globe. What are the causes, and what is being done to help the poorest of the poor? This edition of the Journal begins with a report on the situation in the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo, where an estimated 45,000 people die every month of hunger and disease. Then, Bill Moyers interviews David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, an organization campaigning to strengthen U.S. political commitment to end global hunger and poverty.
Online
2009; 2008
73.

Made in Asia [electronic resource]: Fast, Cheap, and Fair?

Most industries exploit the advantages of globalization-specifically, low labor costs. Recently, however, major textile manufacturers have come under increasing pressure from fair trade activists and NGOs. This program studies the complex mix of economic forces, corporate policies, and social conditions that go into the production of everyday consumer goods, especially apparel items. Shedding light on the policies of adidas, H&M, and other key players in the global textiles market, the program examines the circumstances under which sports shoes and T-shirts are produced in countries like Indonesia, India, and Turkey. Viewers will gain insight into labor practices that have improved but remain troublesome for many workers.
Online
2009; 2007
74.

Global Health and Human Development [electronic resource]

Is good health simply the absence of physical disease, or should emotional well-being also be of concern to global aid organizations? This program profiles the work of Australia's Nossal Institute for Global Health to explain how psychological and social factors impact life expectancy and infant mortality. The video covers basic health needs, food scarcity, distribution of wealth, the UN's Human Development Index and its 2015 Millennium Development Goals, and some sustainable practices that have empowered a community in Ghana to maintain its health without relying on foreign aid.
Online
2011
75.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Hans Rosling, New Insights on Poverty and Life Around the World

What sets researcher Hans Rosling apart isn't just his apt observations of broad social and economic trends, but the stunning way he presents them. In this TEDTalk, Rosling uses his cool data tools to illustrate how countries are pulling themselves out of poverty. "Rosling believes that making information more accessible has the potential to change the quality of the information itself," says BusinessWeek.com.
Online
2007
76.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Niall Ferguson - the 6 Killer Apps of Prosperity

Over the past few centuries, Western cultures have been very good at creating general prosperity for themselves. Historian Niall Ferguson asks: why the West, and less so the rest? He suggests half a dozen big ideas from Western culture - call them the six killer apps - that promote wealth, stability, and innovation. And in this new century, he says, these apps are all shareable.
Online
2011
77.

Cappuccino Trail [electronic resource]: Global Economy in a Cup

A 150-pound bag of coffee beans might earn a farmer
Online
2005; 2001
78.

Private Property vs. The Public Trust [electronic resource]

The fictional locale known as Eagle Bay is breathtakingly beautiful. First home to a handful of modest houses, over the decades it has transitioned into a neighborhood of stately mansions-except for one 50-acre parcel, whose owners now want to sell it for subdivision. This Fred Friendly Seminar moderated by Harvard Law School's Arthur Miller explores the complexities that arise when a family's freedom to sell its property clashes with their neighbors' and local government's idea of land management. The ten-member panel includes Jane Hague, past president of the National Association of Counties; land use attorneys Robert Freilich and Kenneth Bley; and developer Grady O'Rear.
Online
2006; 2000
79.

Endangered [electronic resource]: Biodiversity and Economic Development

Year by year the tourist trade has dwindled in fictional Pingwah Falls, leaving the town practically bankrupt. When a plan was unveiled for a modern resort, everyone's hopes rose.until they learned the land is home to a threatened species of bird. In this Fred Friendly Seminar moderated by Harvard Law School's Arthur Miller, panelists including former county supervisor Tom Mullen; Christopher Williams, of the World Wildlife Fund; Kieran Suckling, of the Center for Biological Diversity; Thomas McGill, of Michael Brandman Associates; and seven others try to determine what sacrifices should be made in the name of biodiversity-and who should make them.
Online
2005; 2001
80.

Sprawl [electronic resource]: Inner Cities and Outer Suburbs

To at least one resident of the fictional city of Metropolis, a new outer suburb being planned for some pristine farmland sounds like the American Dream come true. His brother, also a Metropolite but an advocate of smart growth, sees it as a nightmare. Moderated by Harvard Law School's Arthur Miller, this Fred Friendly Seminar seeks to understand the housing situation facing the U.S.-a burgeoning nation that creates more than 1.5 million new households per year. The 12-member panel includes Bruce Katz, of the Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy at The Brookings Institution; Stuart Meck, of the American Planning Association; and Harry Alford, of The National Black Chamber of Commerce.
Online
2005; 2001