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1.

Somalia [electronic resource]

Featuring American journalist and NPR and PBS foreign correspondent, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this classic program examines human rights in the African nation of Somalia.
Online
1993
2.

South Africa [electronic resource]: A Human Rights Success Story

After years of political violence by both the African National Congress (ANC) and the white minority government, leaders realized that they were locked in a mutually harmful stalemate. A negotiated settlement was the only way to prevent more bloodshed. Negotiations for a transition to majority rule opened in 1990 and, unfortunately, led to an increase in political violence. This episode explores how this violence threatened the transition to a multi-racial democracy. Judge Richard Goldstone discusses the conspiracy at senior levels of the South African security forces to sabotage the transition to majority rule. Also featured are excerpts from Bethany Yaarrow's film "Mama Awethu" about women in South Africa. Also, "Freedom Charter," a song about the struggle to end apartheid is perfo [...]
Online
1994
3.

Rwanda [electronic resource]: After the Genocide

After World War I, Belgium took control of Rwanda from a defeated Germany and promoted the rule of the Tutsi tribe over the entire country. The 1959 Rwandan Revolution saw Hutu activists force more than 100,000 Tutsi into neighboring countries. Violence began again when the country gained its independence in 1962. The repression continued for decades, but economic growth lessened the violence. Over 100 days in 1994, the Rwandan Genocide killed 500,000 to 1,000,000 Tutsi and politically moderate Hutu. This episode looks at what has happened in the country since then. A Rwandan wedding ceremony and the birth of new families demonstrates the progress in healing old wounds. Also featured, is an interview with Ken Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch. Roth discusses the impact o [...]
Online
1995
4.

Nigeria [electronic resource]

Since gaining independence in 1960, Nigeria has had a poor record on human rights. This episode looks at the situation in the midst of 33 years of military rule. From the promised elections that were aborted by the military junta, the execution of a prominent human rights activist, and the actions of the U.S. government and Shell Oil Company, Nigerians have been denied basic human rights. The worldwide response to this situation is examined. Included is a report on the lobbying efforts in the U.S. by American corporations, non-profit organizations, Nigerian nationals, and the American public, due to its position as Nigeria's largest trading partner. Also featured is an excerpt from "Ken Saro-Wiwa: An African Martyr," the final interview with the human rights activist before his execution.
Online
1996
5.

Trade and Human Rights [electronic resource]

After years of working to end apartheid in South Africa, including 27 years in jail, Nelson Mandela and the ANC are now in power. In this episode, the new South African president discusses his plan to forge a 'government of national unity' in South Africa. Also featured is a discussion on the controversial linking of trade and human rights, including China's "Most Favored Nation" status, with Henry Kissinger, Lane Kirkland, the Dalai Lama, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights John Shattuck, and former Chinese political prisoner Wang Juntao. And finally, a look at the film "Satya: A Prayer for the Enemy" which explores the spiritual resistance of Tibetan nuns persecuted by their Chinese occupiers?
Online
1994
6.

South Africa [electronic resource]

This episode is dedicated to the celebration of the anniversary of Nelson Mandela's 1994 election. James Earl Jones and Alfre Woodard narrate the American/South African coproduction of "Countdown to Freedom: Ten Days that Changed South Africa." Dr. Makaziwe Mandela, President Mandela's eldest daughter, discusses her father and her position as affirmative action/equal opportunity advisor to the University of Witswatersrand. Twelve hundred former prisoners of Robben Island join together at the Cape Town prison for a reunion and conference. Also featured is a music video of "Never Again" by the rap group Prophets of the City?
Online
1995