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1.

France [electronic resource]: Traditional Cultured Butter

The French love their butter; in fact they consume more of it than any other country in Europe. The traditional, cultured butter produced in an old butter churn is hard to find, unless you know what to look for. Host Will Studd visits the two oldest cooperative dairies in Normandy and the Charentes-Poitou to see them make butter the traditional way, and understand the taste and texture differences between the two regions. He then meets Yves Bourdier at La Maison du Buerre in Brittany and discovers the secrets behind the art of the Malaxer. Finally, an old friend offers to show him how easy it is to make delicious fresh cultured butter at home using crème fraiche.
Online
2012
2.

Wales [electronic resource]: Artisan Cheese Champions

Caerphilly may be the most famous traditional cheese of Wales, but it's not the only one. Host Will Studd travels to the island to visit Caws dairy and meets the family responsible for re-creating farmhouse Caerphilly. Then he catches up with an old friend at Gorwydd farm who is now making this benchmark cheese from raw cow's milk. Finally, Will discovers how two cheese-makers are responsible for putting Wales back on Britain's specialist cheese map.
Online
2010
3.

Bhutan [electronic resource]: Yak's Cheese and Butter in Bhutan

Remote and isolated, the Kingdom of Bhutan measures its economy on Gross National Happiness. Host Will Studd travels to a small farm in Bhutan where he samples some local cuisine and learns how the locals churn butter for cooking and ceremonial purposes by hand. He is then invited to visit one of the oldest monasteries in this devoutly Buddhist country, where he lights candles to guide the souls of the dead before sampling a cheese and chili dish. Next, he goes high into the Himalayas for a lesson on how to milk a yak, and how to make cheese the traditional way; in a smoky mountain hut.
Online
2012
4.

Denmark [electronic resource]: The Nordic Cheese Revolution

The Danish dairy industry is widely recognized as one of the most efficient in Europe; it produces more blue cheese than any country in the world. In this episode Will Studd travels to the pretty island of Bornholm to witness the process involved in making Danablu. Then he's off to Copenhagen to find out how the Nordic food revolution is now encouraging large producers to look at more interesting cheese varieties. In the end he discovers nothing has changed when it comes to the Danish love of smoked cheese.
Online
2010
5.

France [electronic resource]: The Last Trappist Monks Cheese

Trappist Monks from the order of Cisterian have been responsible for producing some of the most famous washed rind cheeses in France. These days, the rapidly dwindling number of monks, threatens cheese-making in monasteries with extinction. Will Studd travels to the abbey of Mont des Cats in Normandy, Citeaux in Burgundy, and Tamie in Savoy to discover how these cheeses are being made and what the future holds for these classic benchmarks.
Online
2012
6.

Germany [electronic resource]: Artisan Cheeses of Germany

Germany is the largest producer of cheese in Europe, with a history that dates back to pre-Roman times. Will Studd travels to the German Alps to taste a seasonal mountain cheese called Bergkase. He then heads to a small biodynamic farm to discover how Germany's most popular fresh cheese, quark, is made. Next up, he ventures north for a taste of Tilsiter cheese, and finally, a visit to a cheese-making monk who sings as he makes cheese from the milk of his beloved flock of sheep.
Online
2010
7.

India [electronic resource]: Paneer and the Chennai Sweets of West Bengal

In Hindu society, the cow is revered as a holy beast, so it should come as no surprise that India produces more milk than any other country in the world. In this episode, host Will Studd travels to Calcutta for the Holi festival and learns the origins of India's popular cheese-Paneer. A visit to an ancient cheese market and a demonstration showing how curd is used to make the cheese and the city's distinctive Chennai sweets is followed by a very colorful family celebration. Finally, he visits a typical buffalo dairy.
Online
2012
8.

Israel [electronic resource]: Israeli Artisan Cheese

The land lying between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea has held deep spiritual significance since the beginning of modern civilization; it also has a long history of cheese making. Will Studd visits the old city of Jerusalem then drives to the Judah hills where he meets Shey Saltzer, leader of the new artisan cheese movement. Next he visits an Arab Israeli family that makes traditional sheep's milk cheese at home, and the city of Galilee where he discovers one of the oldest marinated cheeses in Israel. Then Will heads south to the stunning beauty of the remote Negev desert to meet some very unusual goat cheese makers.
Online
2012
9.

Italy [electronic resource]: Rare Mountain Cheeses of the Northeast

Due to weather conditions, traditional cheese making is strictly seasonal in the Alps of North Eastern Italy and production is very limited. Host Will Studd travels to the foothills of the Alps to meet the oldest cheese-maker in Italy, and learn how Asiago d'allevo was made in times past; over a wooden fire. On the Perenzin family's dairy he learns about their famous Montasio and 'drunken' cheeses. Onto the beautiful Dolomites where Will meets an affineur whose cheese cellar is an old pre-war bunker, and he visits a farm still making a very rare grey cheese and wonderful handmade butter.
Online
2012
10.

Norway [electronic resource]: The Cheese Legacy of the Vikings

From the spectacular fjords to the valley of goats, Norway's cheese legacy includes more than Jarlsberg. In this episode, host Will Studd visits artisan cheese-makers throughout the country and discovers a wide selection to sample. From a rare skimmed milk cheese that dates back to Viking times, and a fresh cow's milk cheese called Pulltost, to Gammelost, which lives up to its notorious reputation for smelling like old socks and Ghetost, an ancient sweet brown caramel cheese remarkably similar to fudge.
Online
2010
11.

Piedmont [electronic resource]: Rare Traditional Cheeses From the Hills and Alps

Italy's Piedmont region produces more cheese than any other region in the county. Will Studd travels to the area to learn about the different types of Toma cheeses made in the Italian Alps. Then he moves on to the Langhe Hills to meet the producers of two cheeses that were endangered, but are now protected by the Slow Food movement. Next up is a tasting of truffle-infused cheese in the underground cellars of Beppino Occelli, followed by a hunt for white truffles.
Online
2010
12.

Scotland [electronic resource]: Artisan Cheeses From the Highlands and Islands

Scotland is not the first country that come to mind when you think of cheese-making, but in the rugged rolling highlands, Will Studd unearths an ancient sour cream 'chieftains' cheese called Caboc. Then he enjoys some Strathdowne blue with oatcakes, and finds out how the cheese also matches with single malt whisky. Next Will is off to the Isle of Mull where an enterprising family, supplement the feed for their cows with whisky mash during the cold winter months.
Online
2010
13.

Sicily [electronic resource]: Traditional Flavoured Pecorino Cheeses

As the largest island in the Mediterranean, the culture of Sicily has been influenced by the Greeks, Romans, Arabs and Normans - and of course the Italians. These influences can clearly be seen in the traditional cheese-making process. Host Will Studd travels to Sicily and visits one of the last farmhouse dairies making a saffron-flavored sheep's milk cheese. He also samples the many flavors of Sicilian Pecorino, and explores a Dickensian cheese-maturing room that is several centuries behind the times.
Online
2010
14.

Southeast France [electronic resource]: Traditional Cheeses of Provence

Will Studd travels to Provence in the South East of France and discovers Banon, a traditional benchmark goat's milk cheese wrapped in dried chestnut leaves, and a rare cheese called Brousse du Rove. He then drives from Provence to the Vercors plateau, where he leans about St Marcellin and an extraordinary, small dried goat cheese whose name literally means ' the feet of god'.
Online
2010
15.

Spain [electronic resource]: The Catalonian Cheese Revolution

The past two decades have seen an extraordinary revolution in Spanish cuisine, mostly from Catalan chefs. The region has also led a renaissance in artisan cheese making which virtually disappeared in the Franco era. Will Studd visits the beautiful city of Barcelona where he meets author Eric Canut. The hills outside the city hold the secret to the revival of Catalan cheeses; from the traditional Mato and Tupi, to the newcomer Garrotxa. Next, several chefs demonstrate ways to use the local cheeses in traditional Catalonian dishes. Then it's off to Manorca, the island of cheese, to see how the traditional Mahon cheese is produced.
Online
2012
16.

Tasmania [electronic resource]: The New Cheese Pioneers

In this episode, host Will Studd again teams up wit renowned Australian chef Tetsuya Wakuda for a tour of Tasmania, and to demonstrate a few of his unusual recipe ideas with the local dairy and produce. On their travels, the pair meets with some artisan cheese makers who have proudly put the country back on the map. Some of the recipes include Bruny Island cheese and wood-fired oysters, artisan cider produced from heritage apples, handmade cultured butter from Elgaar Farm, John Bignell's blue cheese and leatherwood honey, King Island cream and lobster, and even a Wasabi flavored cheese.
Online
2010
17.

Turkey [electronic resource]: The Traditional Cheeses of Turkey

The Republic of Turkey is the crossroads of Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and one the legacies of its history of invasion is a variety of regional cheeses that are rarely found outside the country. Will Studd visits the ancient spice markets of Istanbul, Canakkal to learn about this country's most popular marinated cheeses Azine Peynir, and a hard cheese called Mahalic. In the Anatolia region of the country he visits a small dairy near Kars where he gets a lesson in making the rare blue string cheese, and finds Tulum, the traditional cheese aged in animal skins.
Online
2012