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1.

China [electronic resource]: Dance Around Golden Calf

As China continues to experiment with Western-style economics, many city dwellers already enjoy the prerogatives of a market economy. But how will China feed itself as more and more farmers flee their land for the allure of urban living? This program seeks to understand the effects of economic reform on Chinese society, from the villages to the cities. Will cultural values and the traditional arts and sciences retain their importance as China makes its bid for first-world status, or will they and the rest of the old China be swept away by Western attitudes, a burgeoning middle-class, and the country's new identity as a nascent economic powerhouse?
Online
2006; 1997
2.

Mongolia [electronic resource]: Wrestling With Change

Close to the Russian border, far removed from Mongolia's polluted and overcrowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar, an ancient herding culture fights to maintain its identity-and its survival. This program examines the nomadic communities of the Mongolian plains and their resistance to change, despite growing pressure on many herders to modernize and migrate to urban areas. Viewers meet some who hold fast to the old ways and some who have already moved to the city, even though they long for the open landscape and acknowledge that "a Mongolian without a horse is like a bird without wings." Scholar Tsedev Dojoo further explores the impact of Mongolia's new emphasis on commercial agriculture, mineral extraction, and other industries.
Online
2010; 2009
3.

Feast or Famine [electronic resource]: Water Management and Food Production in China

To manage the country, we must first control the waters, is an ancient Chinese saying that is more true today than ever. This program documents farmers' hardships-droughts that leave Shanxi Province bone-dry and floods that inundate the lands bordering the Yangtze River-and discusses the exacerbating effects of deforestation and urban growth. Also, potential remedies are showcased, including new dams, increased water conservation, sustainable agricultural practices, improved planting methods, genetic modification of crops, and the monumental South to North Water Transfer Project.
Online
2000
4.

Inside China [electronic resource]: The Newest Revolution

Through the eyes of one peasant family, this classic film looks at China's latest revolution: a gamble with individual wealth and material incentives. A huge national experiment plans to dismantle the communes in an effort to modernize the country. While this refocusing on individual effort would potentially enrich the peasants and workers, it could also threaten the communal life established since the Chinese Revolution of 1949.
Online
1983
5.

China [electronic resource]: Food for a Billion Plus

Despite its huge population and expanding industrial economy, most of China's inhabitants are farmers. This program journeys to Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Beijing, exploring the relationship between Chinese agriculture and the urban centers of the country. Featuring visits to large-scale and family-operated farms, a walk along the Great Wall, and an interview with the U.S. embassy's agricultural attache, the program illuminates China's efforts to improve crop yields, food distribution, and environmental conditions.
Online
2005; 2002
6.

To Have and Have Not [electronic resource]: Wealth and Poverty in the New China

Every year this nation's economy struggles to absorb millions of the unemployed, while the rich move to gated communities with private schools and tennis courts. That might sound like America, but it isn't. This Wide Angle documentary studies the new China, once the home of Mao's rigidly imposed social equality-and today, a member of the World Trade Organization containing both staggeringly wealthy and tragically destitute citizens. The country's commitment to private enterprise and free markets may reshape China more in a single year than most countries change in a decade. This eye-opening program illustrates the effect of that dynamic on the people of China.
Online
2006; 2002
7.

A New Generation [electronic resource]

It can be argued that China's newfound affluence is made possible not by bold entrepreneurs but by disadvantaged migrant workers, millions of whom have left the rural villages in which they were born to seek better lives in cities. This film takes viewers inside that globally significant megatrend with stories of Chinese migrants and their challenges. Li Xu Bin and his wife Dai barely get by on temp jobs in the Beijing suburb of Dong Xin Dian. But in Guiyang, capital of Guizhou province, a young woman named Tian Qiuyu has rejected work for hire and founded her own PR firm. And at Tongji University in Shanghai, budding architect Guan Zhaoyu makes the most of the education her parents never had. Expert commentary comes from Fudan University professor Zhou Dunren, who talks about the im [...]
Online
2012
8.

More Than Half the Sky [electronic resource]

Mao's aphorism about the strength and ability of women may have helped to do away with foot-binding, child marriage, and other archaic traditions, but in 21st-century China gender equality is as illusory as ever. This film examines the challenges that Chinese women face, especially the obstacles to prosperity and security that the country's poor, rural women know all too well. Viewers meet Yu Xinpei, who migrated to Shangai from a remote southern village. At first apprenticed to a hairdresser, she's now starting a salon of her own. Meanwhile, sociologist Liu Bohong talks about the difficulties women encounter when they move to cities-although those who stay in the provinces "have it harder." Many become suicide statistics, which is why physician Xu Rong has founded a support group fo [...]
Online
2012
9.

A Dramatic History [electronic resource]

Three decades ago China was regarded as a developing country. Today it is the world's second largest economy, having made the journey from scarcity and poverty to wealth and abundance faster than any other nation in history-a narrative that Chinese leaders are eager to promote. But the official record makes no mention of events which directly precipitated China's astonishing economic rise-most notably, the Tiananmen Square massacre of 1989. This film describes what happened when the rigid policies instigated under Mao gave way to the era of Deng Xiao Ping, who ushered in unprecedented opportunities for creating personal wealth-as well as sociopolitical paradigm shifts that no one could anticipate. Expert commentary is provided by Chen Mingming, a high-ranking Chinese diplomat; Profes [...]
Online
2012
10.

The Comeback [electronic resource]

To surpass the U.S. in economic might, China needs access to cheap energy and raw materials. That's why it is now heavily invested in developing countries-most notably in Africa, where millions of Chinese citizens have relocated. Mozambique, which has China to thank for its remarkable 10 percent growth rate, offers an eye-opening case study. This film travels in and around the capital city of Maputo, highlighting examples of Chinese-backed development and assembling various perspectives on China's involvement in the African "lion economies." Surveying a vast, fertile field with his African business partner, Chinese-born rice producer Luo Haoping describes new agricultural techniques he's shared with local growers, while Lyle White, a South African expert on China, sheds light on the [...]
Online
2012
11.

Everything Has a Price Tag [electronic resource]

Skyrocketing wealth might be building a new China, but it is also leading to deep divisions within Chinese society. As in the United States, some experts even question whether or not a widening lifestyle gap is truly beneficial for the country's long-term economic growth, not to mention for social stability. This film looks at emerging class differences in what was originally designed to be a classless state, with discussions focusing on multigenerational poverty in rural areas and the precarious existence of hundreds of millions of migrant workers on the fringes of China's cities. For street-level insight, viewers are invited into the household of two apartment tenants who are most likely living paycheck to paycheck, but who have high ambitions for their young son. Expert commentary [...]
Online
2012
12.

The Africa-China Connection [electronic resource]: A Thriving Business Partnership

Promoting growth and protecting the environment is a contradiction, says Chinese ambassador Chen Mingming, insisting that the opulent lifestyle of "people overseas" should figure into any assessment of his country's environmental policies. "Isn't it legitimate for the Chinese to seek the same quality of life? That means economic development." Others who support the government's approach to ecological problems also appear in this film, such as political observer Xie Chuntao-although he does acknowledge tangible policy splits within China's leadership and the difficulty of balancing environmental protection with the constant need for energy and raw materials. For a less ambivalent view, the film turns to activist Chen Faqing as he meets with angry suburbanites outside Hangzhou-a suppos [...]
Online
2013