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1.

The Terrible Transformation [electronic resource]

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Examines one of the largest forced migrations in world history and how this mass movement of people was instrumental in the creation of America. Millions of Africans are abducted from their homelands to labor in the colonies. In the American colonies, African skills and labor transform vast lands into agricultural profits. But slavery's inhumane codes and punishments foment African resistance and escape, bringing more brutality from slave holders.
Online
2005; 1998
2.

Revolution [electronic resource]

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While the American colonies challenge Britain for independence, American slavery is challenged from within, as men and women fight to define what the country will be. In the upheaval of war, 100,000 black people escape their bondage and threaten the institution of slavery as never before. Initially, George Washington refuses to allow black volunteers into his army, but when the British Governor of Virginia promises freedom to slaves who will fight for England, the American high command is forced to reconsider. As the 18th century comes to a close, America hopes to walk a dangerous tightrope between property rights and human rights.
Online
2005; 1998
3.

The Fall of the Aztecs [electronic resource]

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Series host Michael Wood lands on a small island off the coast of Mexico, where in 1519, Hernan Cortes led a band of some 500 soldiers onto the mainland and into the heart of the Aztec empire. On the shores of the Yucatan, Cortes first saw the Mayan pyramids. Wood continues west to the frontier between the Mayan and Aztec worlds. The Aztecs greeted Cortes with gifts of gold, an act that sealed their fate. Trekking over the mountains in torrential storms, Wood wonders how this small band of Spanish adventurers overthrew an empire of millions, and why the Aztec ruler Montezuma believed the Spanish were gods.
Online
2005; 2000
4.

The Conquest of the Incas [electronic resource]

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The Incas in Peru worshipped the sun and thought their empire was the whole world-- until the Spaniards arrived. In 1532, conquistador Francisco Pizarro uncovered this civilization, which extended 3,000 miles from Ecuador to Chile. Wood traces Pizarro's daring march into Peru with fewer than 200 men. Following ancient Inca desert roads. Wood climbs the Andes with a train of llamas, ascending fairy-tale peaks overlooking the Pacific coast. The Spanish pursuit of Manco, the Inca leader who mounted a war of liberation, takes Wood to Cuzco, the Incan "naval of the earth." He continues on to the ruins of the Sacred Valley and Macchu Picchu, over the passes of the high Andes, up 17,000-foot glaciers and down into tropical rainforests to locate the lost city of the Incas at Vilcabamba.
Online
2005; 2000
5.

The Search for el Dorado [electronic resource]

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From Peru, Wood moves to Ecuador, where a member of the Pizarro clan, Gonzalo, led an expedition in 1541 to find El Dorado, a ruler reputed to possess unsurpassed riches in gold. Crossing the Andes, Wood and his crew hack through the dense forests to the Coca River. Once there, they build a balsa raft to carry them to the site where the Spanish expedition split up. On Christmas day of 1541, Francisco de Orellana, a veteran of the battles with the Incas in Peru, set out with 57 men on one of the great voyages of exploration, Orellana and his men discovered and traveled the length of the Amazon River, encountering an elaborate network of kingdoms and unknown empires-- with a population perhaps as high as five million-- that were eventually wiped out by war and disease.
Online
2005; 2000
6.

All the World Is Human [electronic resource]

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Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca arrived in Florida in 1528 to begin the exploration and conquest of what is now the southern United States. Wood tracks their progress northward toward Tallahassee, where, fleeing hostile Indians, the conquistadors built boats in the hope of reaching Mexico. Shipwrecked off the coast of Texas, most were never seen again. For 5 years, Cabeza de Vaca lived among the Karankwa and then the Coahuiltean Indians until he rejoined 3 fellow conquistadors. Together they embarked on an epic walk across America to the Pacific coast, reappearing 8 years after they were lost. Using Cabeza de Vaca's own book Wood rides through the north Mexican desert, sleeping at prehistoric campsites. Traveling to the Pacific along ancient Indian trails, he visits the spectacular Native [...]
Online
2005; 2000
7.

Seeking the First Americans [electronic resource]

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Archaeologists from Texas to Alaska search for clues to the identity of the first people to tread the North American continent - the early hunters who between 11,000 and 50,000 years ago crossed the Bering Strait in pursuit of game.
Online
2005; 1980
8.

The West: Episode 1 the People [electronic resource]

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Experience the rich cultural diversity of Native American tribes and the impact that early white explorers had on their lives. Students will learn about the mysterious disappearance of the Anasazi culture and the successful Pueblo revolt against their Spanish conquerors. First-person accounts bring to life the adventures of early explorers, from Cabeza de Vaca, the first white man to enter the West, to the Lewis and Clark expedition
Online
2005; 1996
9.

New World Encounters [electronic resource]

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After introducing the team of historians who have created the series, Professor Miller reviews the beginnings of American history from west to east, following the first Ice Age migrations through the corn civilizations of Middle America and the explorations of Columbus, DeSoto and the Spanish.
Online
2000
10.

Unearthing Secret America [electronic resource]

This edition of PBS Scientific American Frontiers delves into the secrets of America's past - as archeologists investigate three tremendous discoveries: unique finds that bring our history to life like never before. Unearthing Secret America shows how the Jamestown fort offers clues to the struggles of the colonists and how slave quarters at Monticello and Williamsburg expose a secret world for the first time: revealing economic shifts that altered the experience of enslaved and free people in ways we are just beginning to understand. A story told with rich detail, it is a fresh and up-close look at life in America from the colonial period up through the 19th century.
Online
2002
11.

New York, 1609-1825 [electronic resource]: The Country and the City

This episode of New York: A Documentary Film begins by identifying the key themes that shaped New York's history: commerce and capitalism, diversity and democracy, transformation and creativity. Filmmaker Ric Burns charts the development of the city founded by the Dutch as a purely commercial enterprise, first as New Amsterdam, a freewheeling enclave of trade and opportunity; then as the British colony of New York, bestowed as a birthday gift upon the Duke of York by his brother, King Charles, and fueled by slavery; soon after as a strategically pivotal locale in the American Revolution; and ultimately as the city of New York: the nation's first capital and the place destined to define urban life in America - and American ideals.
Online
2003
12.

How the States Got Their Shapes [electronic resource]

Is it just a fluke of history that Illinois, not Wisconsin, contains the city of Chicago? Whatever happened to the state of Jefferson? And why is Texas too big to mess with? This program uncovers the political, cultural, and geographical forces that shaped the map of the United States. From the original thirteen colonies to the jigsaw puzzle of today's 50 states... from the nooks and crannies of the east to the rigid boxes of the west... from the Atlantic to the Pacific, viewers learn how America was carved out of the landscape and how the forces that sculpted our country still influence it today.
Online
2010
13.

Origins [electronic resource]

This program begins with the arrival of 20 enslaved Africans brought to Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619 and examines the impact of slavery on African Americans. C. Eric Lincoln, professor of philosophy and religion at Duke University and a noted authority on African-American religion, explains why African roots are important to African Americans and shows how the African cultural heritage-music, dance, art, blues, and storytelling-manifests itself in American life.
Online
2012
14.

The War That Made America Part 1 [electronic resource]: A Country Between

This episode focuses on George Washington, a pivotal figure in the start of the French and Indian War, a conflict that pitted England against France in the New World. Caught between were the Indian nations, whose leaders struggled to protect their people's interests. After a resounding defeat in his first full-scale battle at Fort Necessity, Washington became an aide to General Edward Braddock, who had been sent from England with a large force to evict the French. Braddock was overwhelmingly defeated and died of his battlefield wounds. Britain then sent additional troops, setting the stage for the next phase of the war.
Online
2005
15.

The War That Made America Part 2 [electronic resource]: Unlikely Allies

As the war moved to upstate New York, relationships among the French, British, Indians, and colonial settlers become increasingly tense. This episode tells how Indians saw the war as an opportunity to regain control of their territory. While French and English officers perceived the Indians as barbarians, they were forced into uneasy alliances with them. Interesting characters emerged, like British general Andrew William Johnson, an Irish fur trader with an exceptional ability to bridge the cultural divide, and his friend, the Mohawk Chief Hendrick. As the front lines stretched from North Carolina to Canada, it was far from clear who the victors would be.
Online
2005
16.

The War That Made America Part 3 [electronic resource]: Turning the Tide

In this episode, the tide has turned, and the British have started to tighten the noose on the outnumbered French forces. Although British Major-General James Abercrombie was defeated by the Marquis de Montcalm at Fort Ticonderoga, France no longer supplied the resources for victory. The British dispatched General John Forbes to conquer Fort Duquesne at the Forks of the Ohio, where the French had been entrenched since Braddock's defeat. An Eastern Delaware chief named Teedyuscung helped secure victory for Forbes. Washington was almost killed by "friendly fire," and wondered if Providence had spared him for a higher purpose.
Online
2005
17.

The War That Made America Part 4 [electronic resource]: Unintended Consequences

This final episode describes how the British push north into Canada and lay siege to the hilltop fort at Quebec. General James A. Wolfe orders his troops to launch a surprise attack that defeats the French at last. Aided by the Iroquois, the British bring the war, and French influence in Canada, to an end. In the aftermath of victory, the British treasury is drained, and Parliament imposes taxes on the colonies. George Washington, now a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses, chafes at British control. With the Stamp Act and the Tea tax, the time arrives to declare independence, and Washington takes command of the Continental Army.
Online
2005
18.

A Son of Africa [electronic resource]

The Interesting Narration of the Life of Olaudah Equiano created a sensation when it was published in 1789. Written by ex-slave Equiano, the autobiography vividly described the horrors of being kidnapped from Africa, the Middle Passage, and life in captivity, and fueled the growing abolitionist movement. This program employs dramatic reconstructions of this slave narrative, archival material, and interviews with scholars such as Stuart Hall and Ian Duffield to explain the social and economic context of the 18th-century slave trade.
Online
1996
19.

Down in the Old Belt [electronic resource]: Voices From the Tobacco South

The tobacco farmers of the Old Belt of Virginia represent a history and a way of life that began with the founding of Jamestown and the colony of Virginia on the Chesapeake Bay. But tobacco farmers in Southside Virginia, like coal miners in Appalachia, have come upon hard times. Declining quotas, production moving overseas, society's changing attitudes, and the 2004 tobacco buyout have radically altered the cultural landscape of the Old Belt, the birthplace of Bright Leaf tobacco. This program traces the history and culture of tobacco in Virginia, providing a basis for studying past and ongoing socioeconomic changes, from the era of slavery to the present. Combining extensive archival materials with interviews and oral histories conducted with several Old Belt tobacco farming familie [...]
Online
2005
20.

Age of Plunder [electronic resource]

This episode reveals the explosion of global capitalism that began with Christopher Columbus stumbling across America while searching for China. The search for Gold and spread of Christianity caused Europeans to colonize the New World, discovering many new lands, such as that of the Incas in Peru. We visit Cajamarca, where the King Atahualpa was held captive by Pizarro and forced to convert to Christianity. At Amsterdam's tulip fields, we reflect on the first global stock market crash-Tulipmania. In the 145 years from 1492 to 1637, European capitalism was born and spread around the globe.
Online
2012