You searched for:

Format
:
Online
x
Language
:
English
x
Geographic Location
:
England
x
96 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

General Sir Frank Simpson

Loading...
"Participants: Gen. Sir Frank Simpson, retiring commandant, British Imperial Defense College, interviewed by Larry Lesueur and Peter Dimick. Topics: Atomic weapons for defense; the Belgian Fabric National Rifle; Federal Republic of Germany and Great Britain in the European Defense Community; communists in Southeast Asia, Suez, India, Pakistan; and Anglo-American relations."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, February 5, 1954 (200LW566).
Online
1954
2.

Battle of Britain [electronic resource]

The Battle of Britain air campaign was waged by the German Luftwaffe against the United Kingdom during the summer and autumn of 1940. Vicious dogfights took place over some of the most densely populated land in Europe - 3,000 airplanes would be lost as well as 30,000 civilians. This program uses a combination of CGI animation and soldiers' own accounts of the events to tell the story and examines 60-year old aerial reconnaissance photographs that were misinterpreted at the time.
Online
1996
3.

Broken Blossoms, or, the Yellow Man and the Girl

Loading...
A fifteen-year-old street urchin who longs to escape her miserable existence. Emotionally scarred by the torment and neglect of her abusive father, the girl collapses outside the shop of the lonely and disillusioned 'yellow man'. As he tenderly nurtures her back to health, an unspoken romance flowers between them, awakening in each of them feelings of love.
Online
1919
4.

Dressed to Kill

Loading...
Pitted once again against a treacherous female adversary, Holmes and Watson set out to find a group of bank plates stolen from the Bank of England. The fate of Britain's international finance rests on the sleuths' shoulders, as they brush dangerously close to death. The key to the mystery lies in three identical musical boxes which were accidentally sold at auction. But the heinous conspirators stop at nothing to get the boxes back--with only Holmes to stop it.
Online
1946
5.

Covent Garden Tales Episode 1 [electronic resource]: The Architects' Story

Loading...
A documentary about restoring the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden directed by Andy King-Dabbs.
Online
1999
6.

The City [electronic resource]: Money in Murky Waters

More than half of international funds and nearly 80% of European hedge fund assets are channeled through the City of London. The financial sector has spread its branches throughout the world by creating offshore satellites, practicing sovereign bank secrecy, and through tax evasion and money laundering. Nearly half the world's tax havens fly the British flag, supported by London bankers, lawyers and accountants. Mathieu Verboud examines how the City's unique political and administrative organization allows it to exercise control over the British nation-and dominate the global economy.
Online
2011
7.

Dark Beginnings [electronic resource]

In the beginning there were no churches. Richard Taylor explains how they were originally simple buildings intended to protect the altar and the most important Christian rite of all - the Eucharist.
Online
2010
8.

Medieval Life [electronic resource]

Richard Taylor uncovers evidence that shows how and why our parish churches came to play such a crucial role in the everyday life of the Middle Ages. He finds out how rites such as baptism and the largely forgotten ritual known as 'the churching of women' offered people protection from the cradle to the grave.
Online
2010
9.

Medieval Death [electronic resource]

Richard Taylor shows us how churches were designed to give medieval people a way to escape death, with their Judgement scenes, cadaver tombs and graphic depictions of the crucifixion.
Online
2010
10.

Reformation [electronic resource]: Chaos and Creation

The late middle ages was a time of destruction that still leaves its mark on our churches today. Richard Taylor tries to understand the intense medieval devotion to the Virgin Mary and how this fuelled the anger of the Reformation that followed.
Online
2010
11.

Restoration and Reason [electronic resource]

Church life in the eighteenth century is often thought to have been genteel and rather dull, but Richard Taylor finds that churches in this 'Age of the Enlightenment' reflect the intellectual excitement, the vigor and the potential for conflict of a turbulent time.
Online
2010
12.

The Victorians and After [electronic resource]

Richard Taylor discovers how - at the height of the industrial revolution - medieval imagery and ritual make a surprise return to Victorian places of worship and plunge the Anglican Church into conflict. He then reveals how the 20th century would bring even more powerful changes.
Online
2010
13.

Henry VIII's Enforcer [electronic resource]: The Rise and Fall of Thomas Cromwell

Thomas Cromwell was one of the strongest supporters of the English Reformation. At a time when lineage meant everything, Cromwell rose from poor beginnings to become chief minister to King Henry VIII. However, at the moment of his greatest triumph, Cromwell was struck down and destroyed. He fell victim to the King's anger and was beheaded on 28 July 1540. Cromwell has gone down in history as ambitious and corrupt; a ruthless politician who destroyed people and institutions. Journey through Tudor England in search of the truth about Henry VIII's best servant.
Online
2013
14.

Romans to Normans [electronic resource]

The village of Kibworth in Leicestershire is located in the heart of England. It is a place that has lived through the Black Death, the Civil War and the Industrial Revolution, and it was even bombed in World War Two. With the help of the local people and using archaeology, landscape, language and DNA, historian Michael Wood uncovers the lost history of the first thousand years of the village, featuring a Roman villa, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and graphic evidence of life on the eve of the Norman Conquest.
Online
2010
15.

Domesday to Magna Carta [electronic resource]

The story of Kibworth moves on to 1066 when the Normans build a castle there. Michael Wood reveals how the Norman occupation affected the villagers from the gallows to the alehouse, and shows the medieval open fields in action in the only place where they still survive today. With the help of the residents, he charts events in the village leading to the people's involvement in the Civil War of Simon de Montfort. Intertwining the local and national narratives, this is a moving and informative picture of one local community through time.
Online
2010
16.

The Great Famine and the Black Death [electronic resource]

The story of Kibworth reaches the catastrophic 14th century. The village goes through the worst famine in European history, and then, as revealed in the astonishing village archive in Merton College Oxford, two thirds of the people die in the Black Death. Helped by today's villagers - field walking and reading the historical texts - and by the local schoolchildren digging archaeological test pits, Michael Wood follows stories of individual lives through these times, out of which the English idea of community and the English character begin to emerge.
Online
2010
17.

Peasants' Revolt to Tudors [electronic resource]

The story of Kibworth moves on to dramatic battles of conscience in the time of the Hundred Years' War. Amazing finds in the school archive help trace peasant education back to the 14th century and we see how the people themselves set up the first school for their children. Some villagers join in a rebellion against King Henry V, while others rise to become middle class merchants in the textile town of Coventry. On the horizon is the Protestant Reformation, but the rise of capitalism and individualism sow the seeds of England's future greatness.
Online
2010
18.

Henry VIII to the Industrial Revolution [electronic resource]

The tale of Kibworth village reaches the dramatic events of Henry VIII's Reformation and the battles of the English Civil War. Michael Wood tracks Kibworth's 17th century dissenters, travel on the Grand Union Canal, and tells us about an 18th century feminist writer from Kibworth who was a pioneer of children's books. The story of a young highwayman transported to Australia comes alive as his living descendents come back to the village to uncover their roots. Lastly, the Industrial Revolution comes to the village with framework knitting factories, changing the village and its people forever.
Online
2010
19.

Victoria to the Present Day [electronic resource]

In this final episode, helped by today's villagers Michael Wood uncovers the secret history of a Victorian village more colorful than even Dickens could have imagined. Recreating their penny concerts of the 1880s, visiting World War I battlefields with the school and recalling the Home Guard, local land girls and the bombing of the village in 1940, the series finally moves into the brave new world of 'homes for heroes' and the villagers come together to leave a reminder of their world for future generations.
Online
2010
20.

Tim Marlow at the Courtauld: Part One [electronic resource]

The Courtauld's collection of Renaissance art is one of the most important in Britain and includes works by the likes of Bernado Daddi as well as an enigmatic depiction of the Crucifixion by Sandro Botticelli. The collection is also strong in northern European art of this period, and the jewel of the early Renaissance displays is the Lamentation Triptych by the Master of Flemalle. The triptych is now considered to be one of the greatest masterpieces of early Netherlandish painting. But very little is known about the about the work and it is the subject of ongoing research at the Courtauld. But in many ways the star of the Courtauld's collection of Renaissance art is a depiction of Adam and Eve by German artist Lucas Cranach the Elder, a delicately rendered work that captures the mome [...]
Online
2015; 2010