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41.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Natalie Merchant - Singing Old Poems to Life

Natalie Merchant sings from her new album, Leave Your Sleep. Lyrics from near-forgotten 19th-century poetry pair with her unmistakable voice for a performance that brought the TED audience to its feet.
Online
2010
42.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Robert Gupta and Joshua Roman - Duet on "Passacaglia

It's a master class in collaboration as violinist Robert Gupta and cellist Joshua Roman perform Halvorsen's "Passacaglia" for violin and viola. Roman takes the viola part on his Stradivarius cello. It's powerful to watch the two musicians connect moment to moment (and recover from a mid-performance hiccup). The two are both TED Fellows, and their deep connection powers this sparkling duet.
Online
2011
43.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Patrick Chappatte - the Power of Cartoons

In a series of witty punchlines, Patrick Chappatte makes a poignant case for the power of the humble cartoon. His projects in Lebanon, West Africa, and Gaza show how, in the right hands, the pencil can illuminate serious issues and bring the most unlikely people together.
Online
2010
44.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Eric Whitacre - a Virtual Choir 2,000 Voices Strong

In a moving and madly viral video last year, composer Eric Whitacre led a virtual choir of singers from around the world. He talks through the creative challenges of making music powered by YouTube and unveils the first two minutes of his new work, "Sleep," with a video choir of 2,052.
Online
2011
45.

Lascaux [electronic resource]: Prehistory of Art

One of the world's most fascinating museums is by far one of the oldest. But can the paintings there really be called art? This program goes inside the Lascaux cave complex to examine the richest and most beautiful collection of Paleolithic cave drawings in France. Who were the artisans who rendered those arresting images, and how exactly did they do it? Different theories are presented as the cameras capture a site that never ceases to amaze and intrigue.
Online
2005; 1996
46.

Aztecs [electronic resource]: Exposition of a Culture

Presented by sculptor Antony Gormley, this program was created to complement the 2002-3 exhibition of Aztec culture at London's Royal Academy. Many of the incredible works loaned to the exhibit are shown, along with sculptures and artifacts filmed in Mexico City and at important Aztec sites. Leading scholars and curators explore how the nomadic Aztecs drew inspiration from earlier cultures. The variety and sophistication of Aztec art are extensively illustrated, along with the exquisite craftsmanship of their manuscripts and their jewelry.
Online
2006; 2002
47.

African Art [electronic resource]

n the villages of sub-Saharan Africa where traditions are still strong, art is an integral part of daily life. This illuminating program examines the symbolism, aesthetics, and functionality of African art through the vast region's sculpture, masks, architecture, ornaments, clothing, and utensils. In addition, indigenous African religious beliefs are explored through rituals - a spiritual form of performance art - and funerary statuary. Prehistoric rock art is also presented, and the conceptual nature of African art is stressed. Location footage underscoring the rich mosaic of cultures to be found in sub-Saharan Africa provides the backdrop for the program.
Online
2005; 2003
48.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Fighting for Fair Play on TV, and Taxes

With the 2012 campaign season moving from primary to election mode, Bill Moyers invites back to his studio master media decoder Kathleen Hall Jamieson for a look at the role media misinformation will play in the Obama vs. Romney TV ad slugfest. Jamieson runs the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania, including the sites FactCheck.org and FlackCheck.org. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Jamieson and Moyers discuss the sharp increase in deceptive advertising in the 2012 race and equally alarming new obstacles to campaign ad transparency. In addition, Moyers talks to RoseAnn DeMoro, who heads the largest registered nurses' union in the country, and who is championing the Robin Hood Tax, a small government levy the financial sector would pay on commercial t [...]
Online
2012
49.

Breaking the Wall to the Future [electronic resource]: How Art Can Use Feelings for Time to Coproduce Space and Society

Olafur Eliasson is an internationally acclaimed artist whose work The New York Times has called "a model for future art." In this 2010 video lecture from the Falling Walls Conference, Eliasson demonstrates how art, melding emotions with the mechanics of perception, reveals new frontiers in the exploration of time, space, and society. One of the youngest artists to receive a solo exhibition in New York's Museum of Modern Art, this Danish-Icelandic prodigy turned a former brewery in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin into Studio Olafur Eliasson, where he employs more than 30 people. He built artificial waterfalls in New York's East River; dyed rivers green in Los Angeles, Stockholm, and Tokyo; staged a sunset in the huge Turbine Hall of Tate Modern; conceived the complex geometric [...]
Online
2010
50.

She Says [electronic resource]: Women in News

In this classic program, ten pioneering female journalists talk about the difficulty they had breaking into what was once a male-dominated profession. The documentary highlights their struggle to be taken seriously and the impact they eventually had on news reporting. Anna Quindlen recalls the drama of covering Geraldine Ferraro's 1984 bid for vice president, and Nina Totenberg and Narda Zacchino discuss the significance of female journalists reporting on the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hall sexual harassment case. Carole Simpson, the first African-American female network anchor, details how news typically comes from a "white, male perspective" despite the diverse makeup of her own newsroom, and Helen Thomas gives credit to earlier newswomen, such as Barbara Walters, who helped break down [...]
Online
2001
51.

Human Rights in Asia [electronic resource]

This episode examines the historical record of human rights in China and Vietnam. "Moving the Mountain," a documentary directed by Michel Apted and produced by Trudie Styler, profiles former Chinese dissident Li Lu. As an economics major at Nanjing University, Li became politicized and took part in the student protests in Tiananmen Square in 1989. In an interview, Li discusses his life in exile in America and his success as an investment banker. Another documentary excerpted is "From Hollywood to Hanoi," about a Vietnamese-American's journey back to Vietnam. Filmmaker Tiana Alexandra wrestles with her own feelings about the war as she visits My Lai, the site of a massacre by American troops, and sees her film as an instrument of reconciliation between Vietnam and the U.S?
Online
1995
52.

Breaking the Wall Between Earth and Sky [electronic resource]: How Art Challenges Gravity and Light in Our Habitat

The subversive power of art is playing a vital role in providing architecture with risky yet palpable visions of the future. Argentinian artist and architect Tomás Saraceno has garnered worldwide acclaim for his sophisticated and innovative installations, sculptures, and photographic work. Based in Germany, Saraceno develops utopian spaces inspired by evocative elements like soap bubbles, spiderwebs, chocolate-milk foam, astronomical constellations, dust particles, and clouds. He has established a practice of constructing habitable networks based upon complex geometries and interconnectivities that aim to transcend the sensorial effect, inviting the viewer to consider alternative forms of knowledge, feelings, and social interaction. In this Falling Walls lecture, Saraceno demonstrate [...]
Online
2012
53.

Tales From the Museum of Islamic Art [electronic resource]

The Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar, is filled with greatest treasures of the Islamic world. This film tells the stories behind some of the museum's most remarkable items, including Jahan's Jade Pendant and Shah to Al-Sufi's Book of Fixed Stars. The colorful history of the trade routes of great empires is explored with our elderly Arab narrator and storyteller. Viewers will explore this treasure chest and the history of this fascinating culture.
Online
2012
54.

Art Therapy Has Many Faces [electronic resource]

Painters like Frida Kahlo have coped with personal anguish through the creation of art, and for people in therapy, art can be an effective way to deal with depression, traumatic memories, and even physical disability. "Art is not just about beauty," says one patient, "it's also about hideousness." This program provides an overview of art therapy - its aims, various approaches, and ways to best facilitate patient creativity - using footage of therapists in action and endorsements from patients who it has helped. The video also profiles some art therapy pioneers, documents its spread to a variety of settings, and lets viewers know what kind of training is needed to become an art therapist today.
Online
2008
55.

Should You Let Them Watch? [electronic resource]: Assessing Media Violence

The American Medical Association and several other groups have long contended that violence in the media promotes violent behavior in children. But is their evidence really as conclusive as they say it is? No, say noted psychology professor Jonathan Freedman and Pulitzer Prize-winning science author Richard Rhodes. In this ABC News program, Freedman and Rhodes square off against the University of Michigan's Leonard Eron and L. Rowell Heusmann, the powerful team whose decades of data helped lay the foundation of the case against media violence-a case that has traveled all the way to Capitol Hill and might alter the future of the media industry.
Online
2000
56.

Cultural Studies and the Scholarship of Journalism [electronic resource]: James W. Carey

James W. Carey, cultural historian, communication scholar, theorist, writer, and teacher of journalists, discusses cultural studies and the scholarship of journalism.
Online
2008
57.

Development Communication and Communication Technology [electronic resource]: Everett M. Rogers

Everett M. Rogers, communication scholar, theorist, writer, and teacher, discusses his research in the field of development communication, diffusion of innovations, and communication technology.
Online
2008
58.

Political Communication and Mass Communication [electronic resource]: Steven H. Chaffee

Steven H. Chaffee, communication scholar, theorist, historian, methodologist, and teacher, discusses his work in political communication and how mass communication affects research.
Online
2008
59.

Violence and Television [electronic resource]: George Gerbner

George Gerbner, communication scholar, theorist, teacher, poet, and the founder of cultivation theory, discusses his work, which influenced four decades of research on violence and television.
Online
2008
60.

Women and Media [electronic resource]

Dr. Cindy Lont from George Mason University hosts this fast-moving program that features visuals of past and present media as well as interviews with Dr. Maurine Beasley, Sheila Gibbons, and Junior Bridge - all foundational scholars in the field of women and media. The program focuses on four areas: the reclaimed history of women who created media; the media portrayal of women; women's inclusion in the media workforce; and how men perceive media differently than women, which affects what we read, see, and hear from the media.
Online
2006