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1.

Ancient Rome [electronic resource]

At its zenith, the Roman Empire included North Africa, Spain, France, and Britain. The wealth that these conquests generated allowed Roman citizens to live in a sumptuous world of beautifully decorated homes and opulent cities. In this program, scholars discuss Roman unification of Europe, Roman culture and institutions, and the family structure. The role of the army as a major force in Roman society and politics, along with its military structure and tactics, are discussed. The Christianization of Rome and the enduring legacy of Roman Law and institutions in Western government today are also analyzed. 3-D re-creations of the Coliseum and Pompeii allow students to see Rome as it was before the empire collapsed.
Online
2005; 1996
2.

Ancient Greece [electronic resource]

Whether looking at Western language, history, or institutions, no other civilization has so greatly influenced our contemporary world. This program re-creates the Greek world, from the morning market to the evening symposiums, from burial rituals to the Olympics. Beginning with Homer's account of the Trojan War, this program explores Greek civilization using 3-D re-creations of the Parthenon and Agora, maps, and commentary by scholars to provide insight into the daily lives of Greek citizens.
Online
2005; 1996
3.

Ancient India [electronic resource]

The antecedents of modern Indian culture can be traced back to the Harappan civilization, which flourished between 2300 and 1500 BC in what are now Pakistan and Afghanistan. The Aryan tribes from the Russian steppes invaded the subcontinent in 1000 BC, bringing their language and culture. The resulting synthesis between the Aryan and Indian civilizations brought forth a unique society that included a caste system, which soon became entrenched. This program examines the religious tension between Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam, and the historical events that shaped the great Indian civilizations, from the Mauryan Empire through the Mogul Empire. Maps and scholars provide insight into a culture that remains vibrant and diverse today.
Online
2005; 1996
4.

Ancient China [electronic resource]

From the creation legend of Panku to the demise of the Han Dynasty, this program traces Chinese history and explores the roots of Chinese culture today. Visit the Great Wall of China as scholars discuss why it remains even today a symbol of oppression, exemplified in the legend of the weeping woman; the Imperial Palace and how it exemplifies Chinese beliefs in harmony; and the Beijing Opera, whose works are an elaborate retelling of traditional folktales. The influences of Buddhism, ancestor worship, and Taoism in China are also discussed, along with stunning footage of the Buddhist caves and the terra-cotta army.
Online
2005; 1996
5.

It's the Law [electronic resource]

The laws of the criminal justice system are primarily framed by the Constitution, which sets the standards of due process. In this program, lawyers, prosecutors, and judges explain the differences between misdemeanors and felonies, the various degrees of crimes, and the elements of a crime. Investigation procedures in the gathering of evidence and statements are discussed. Legal experts and police officers clearly illustrate such concepts as 5th Amendment rights, Miranda warnings, the "stop and frisk" rule, search warrants, and the "knock and announce" rule. Probable cause and arrest procedures are also demonstrated.
Online
2005; 2001
6.

Order in the Court [electronic resource]

In this program, various legal experts explain pretrial and trial procedures, pointing out along the way differences in juvenile proceedings. Judges and lawyers navigate the pretrial process, beginning with the establishment of probable cause and formal charging by grand jury. Indictment, pretrial release, bail, and arraignment are also discussed. Such concepts as an alibi, burden of proof, and reasonable doubt are clearly explained. Finally, a panel of experts comments on a sentencing hearing and punishment, along with the defendant's constitutional right to appeal.
Online
2005; 2001
7.

Mahatma Gandhi [electronic resource]: Great Soul Lives

This compelling program traces the footsteps of Mahatma Gandhi from London, where he first studied law; to South Africa, where he established his first ashram; to India, where he worked tirelessly for independence. More than a biography, this documentary seeks to understand the essence of Mahatma Gandhi and his philosophy, which guided India in its struggle for independence and continues to inspire others in their efforts to achieve freedom. Daughter-in-law Nirmala Ramdas Gandhi and others who knew the Great Soul share their memories.
Online
2005; 1998
8.

Samurai Japan [electronic resource]

From their ascension to power in the 13th century to the unconditional surrender of Japan at the end of World War II, the Samurai, with their code of virtue and discipline, created a society that prized one's honor over one's own life. In this program, scholars discuss the unique influence that this created and the impact of the Samurai on Japan's institutions and history, including the role of women in political alliances. Also discussed is Japan's shift from feudalism to a bureaucratic and cosmopolitan society, symbolically ruled by the emperor and administered by shoguns.
Online
2005; 1996
9.

The Aztecs [electronic resource]

Aztec myth prophesied that a great city would one day stand on the site where an eagle, perched on a cactus with a serpent in its mouth, was found. Today, Mexico City stands on this mythical site. Although the Aztec Empire fell on April 28, 1521, when Hernando Cortes and his army defeated Montezuma, traces of the thousand-year-old pre-Columbian empire still survive and influence world culture. This program explores Aztec culture and history, from the role of human sacrifice in the Aztec religion to their agricultural advances. Commentary by scholars, maps, and contemporary accounts provide an overview of the events that both shaped and destroyed an empire.
Online
2005; 1996
10.

The Elected [electronic resource]: Presidency and Congress

In an adversarial climate of polarization and power confrontations, how can the U.S. government get anything done? In part one of this program, correspondent Hedrick Smith examines the obstacles to bipartisan compromise between the Clinton administration and Congress as well as the difficulties parties have in disciplining their own members in Congress. In part two, Mr. Smith probes the rise and fall of Newt Gingrich's Republican Revolution in Congress. Smith goes behind the scenes to get Vice President Gore; Clinton executives Leon Panetta and George Stephanopoulos; Congressional leaders Newt Gingrich, Bob Dole, Dick Gephardt, and Tom Daschle; Democratic loyalists and rebels; Republican freshmen and incumbents; and academic experts to divulge how serious miscalculations torpedoed ho [...]
Online
2006; 1996
11.

The Ottoman Empire [electronic resource]

The Ottoman Empire, from the sacking of Constantinople to the end of the 16th century, encompassed Eastern Europe, the Balkans, Algeria, Lebanon, Egypt, Spain, and Turkey. This program examines the structure of this empire, from the family to religion and bureaucracy. The role of the powerful doshan, young Christian peasant boys who were abducted and educated to serve the sultan, is also discussed, along with the role of women. Maps and scholarly commentary portray an empire that at its zenith was an infallible military power dedicated to the spread of Islam, but which also tolerated a diverse population and many creeds within its boundaries.
Online
2005; 1996
12.

The Unelected [electronic resource]: Lobbies

In America, a shadow government wields incredible influence over what gets done inside the Beltway-and who reaps the benefits. In this program, correspondent Hedrick Smith spotlights the powerful influence of the nation's special interest lobbies during the Clinton years. Majority Whip Tom DeLay; Charles Blixt, of R. J. Reynolds; Mike Pertschuk, of the Advocacy Institute; members of Congress; lobbyists; and others scrutinize how UPS paralyzed OSHA's efforts to improve worker safety and how the medical insurance lobby's "Harry and Louise" ads helped sink the Clinton healthcare reform bill. In-depth reporting reveals the stealth tactics used by the tobacco industry in its ongoing fight against federal legislation.
Online
2005; 1996
13.

Amending the Constitution [electronic resource]

This program is an indispensable tool for helping students to understand the constitutional amendment process and to see its importance in their own lives. It defines what an amendment is, explains why amendments have been needed down through the centuries, and describes the process for proposing and ratifying an amendment. Amendments used as illustrations of the process of changing the Constitution have been carefully selected for their interest value to today's students. Correlates to National Standards for United States History Education.
Online
2005; 2002
14.

9/11 Through Saudi Eyes [electronic resource]

In this program, a broad cross-section of Saudis-parents and neighbors of the accused hijackers, editors of Arab News and Asharq Al Awasat, political and military analysts, a psychologist, and others-give their perceptions of events and issues involving September 11th. Interviews provide background on and insights into the lives and minds of the alleged hijackers, the recruitment practices of al Qaeda, the co-opting of jihad for militant political ends, Osama bin Laden's cult of personality, the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, and frustration over U.S. foreign policy. This video, the first documentary to scrutinize 9/11 from the Saudi perspective, is a powerful learning tool for students of political science, the Middle East, and Islam.
Online
2005; 2002
15.

North Korea [electronic resource]: Secret Nation

This undercover report documents the stark poverty and extreme repression in North Korea that exist alongside spectacular cultural events and age-old customs unfettered by political ideology. Posing as a tourist, broadcast journalist Janet Choi risked arrest to get an inside look at one of the planet's most secretive-and brutally totalitarian-countries while under surveillance by a police "tour guide." Archival footage, an interview with a defector, and commentary by Dr. Daniel Pinkston and Timothy McCarthy, both of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, provide additional insights into the country's history, culture, military posture, and living conditions.
Online
2005; 2002
16.

Liberty and Security in an Age of Terrorism [electronic resource]

The U.S. is on orange alert, and the citizens of Midburgh are on the lookout for "suspicious activity." What should they do when circumstantial evidence indicating a potential terrorist plot points to two people of Arab ethnicity? This Fred Friendly Seminar, produced as part of Columbia University's 250th Anniversary, explores the balance between national security and civil liberties in the post-9/11 world. Is one price of vigilance suspicion among neighbors? Do the demands of security now require broader government power to investigate and to detain? Using a hypothetical scenario, moderator Professor Michael Dorf of Columbia Law School pushes the panelists to confront these issues. Panelists include Viet Dinh, a principal architect of the USA PATRIOT Act; Congressman Barney Frank (D [...]
Online
2005; 2003