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1.

The Dark Ages [electronic resource]

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Barbarian kingdoms of the Franks, Burgundians, Visigoths, Lombards, Angles and Saxons, converted to Christianity. Saints became essential figures in adopting the new religion and monasteries protected and nurtured ancient traditions of learning. Images of judgment, scenes from the lives of the saints, and reliquaries provide important information about the tenor of the times.
Online
1989
2.

The Age of Charlemagne [electronic resource]

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The invention of the horseshoe, the crank, the grindstone and the heavy-wheeled plow led to increased food production and shifted economic power to northern Europe. Charlemagne was helped by the use of newfangled stirrups and increased grain supplies. His reign led to flourishing monasteries and masterpieces of Carolingian art.
Online
1989
3.

The Middle Ages [electronic resource]

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How many oxen is a helmet worth? The implications of this question are studied in the violent era of lords and vassals, as a military aristocracy dominated the kingdoms of Europe. Working the land dominated the yearly rhythms and art of peasant, clergy, knight and lord.
Online
1989
4.

The Feudal Order [electronic resource]

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The year 1000 A.D. marked a turning point in Europe. Weber discusses the three estates: clergy, nobles and peasants. The Magna Carta and the Crusades show important changes of the period, and grand new cathedrals demonstrate the Church's growing wealth and importance.
Online
1989
5.

The Late Middle Ages [electronic resource]

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Two hundred years of war and plague took a toil on Europe. New economic powers expanded after the Hundred Years' War and the War of the Roses. The impact of Franciscans, Dominicans and philosopher, Thomas Aquinas, is explored. Featured images include Giotto's paintings of the life of St. Francis.
Online
1989
6.

National Monarchies [electronic resource]

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Commerce and industry became new routes to economic influence and introduced a new middle class into urban life. Guns, gunpowder and dynastic marriages supported centralized monarchies. Featured images include a portrait of Henry VIII and paintings immortalizing Joan of Arc.
Online
1989
7.

The Renaissance and the Age of Discovery [electronic resource]

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Renaissance humanists made man "the measure of all things." The contributions of Machiavelli, Federigo da Montefeltro, Jan van Eyck, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Columbus and Magellan are examined in an era possessed by a passion for knowledge.
Online
1989
8.

The Renaissance and the New World [electronic resource]

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The discovery of America challenged Europe's ideas and institutions as explorers, artists and thinkers surpassed previous limits. Weber explains Leonardo da Vinci's breakthroughs in art and anatomy, the impact of Magellan's journey around the world and the debt the Renaissance owed to ancient humanistic traditions.
Online
1989
9.

The Reformation [electronic resource]

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Discusses the Protestant Reformation's origins in a search for new forms of piety and worship by many Europeans, particularly those living in cities. Voiced by Martin Luther, protest and Protestants shattered the unity of the Catholic Church. The new religion was especially suited to the urban bourgeoisie. Christ was portrayed in a new way in Matthias Grunewald's crucifixion scene from the Isenheim Altarpiece.
Online
1989
10.

The Rise of the Middle Class [electronic resource]

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As the cities grew, new middle-class ethics affected religious life. The printing press's effect on religion, the results of the Catholic council of Trent, and the significance of painter Pieter Brueghel's scenes of everyday life were manifestations of this evolution.
Online
1989
11.

The Wars of Religion [electronic resource]

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For more than a century, the quarrels of Protestants and Catholics tore Europe apart. In France, the idea emerged that religion should be a private, not a state affair to avoid the strife of civil war. News of the day was conveyed in depictions of St. Bartholomew's Massacre and the Catholic League.
Online
1989
12.

The Rise of the Trading Cities [electronic resource]

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The economic spine of Europe is delineated, illustrating how its cities prospered from a combination of geographical assets and religious tolerance. The Dutch made great advances in domestic architecture and the accomplishments of Galileo, Newton, Copernicus, Kepler, Descartes and Spinoza established the great age of scientific discoveries.
Online
1989
13.

The Enlightened Despots [electronic resource]

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Monarchs considered reforms in order to create more efficient and successful societies, but not at the expense of their own power. The important contributions of Frederick the Great, the French philosopher, Voltaire, and the medieval legacy of the corvée are discussed.
Online
1989
14.

The Enlightenment and Society [electronic resource]

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Prosperity, increasing travel, and new middle-class ideas about the universality of human rights took hold in the 18th century, producing a period of peace and growth. Weber discusses the impact of the scientific revolution on religious and intellectual thought.
Online
1989
15.

Modern Philosophers [electronic resource]

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Freedom of thought and expression opened new vistas for French, English and American thinkers. The contributions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Jeremy Bentham, Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin and William Hogarth are featured.
Online
1989
16.

Revolution and Romantics [electronic resource]

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Leaders in the arts, literature and politics argued for social justice and national liberation, pointing to Napoleon and Rousseau as their heroes. Featured images include Gericault's, "The Raft of the Medusa," a scene, like many Romantic works, of great suffering.
Online
1989
17.

The Age of the Nation-States [electronic resource]

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Social reforms softened the brunt of the Industrial Revolution. The great powers banded together to put down revolts, yet competed against each other in acquiring colonies. Weber discusses the effect of national ambitions and alliances in dragging the continent into World War I.
Online
1989
18.

The First World War and the Rise of Facism [electronic resource]

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Program 47 traces the fall of old empires during World War I and the rise of right-wing dictatorships in Italy, Spain, and Germany.
Online
1989
19.

The Second World War and the Rise of Facism [electronic resource]

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Program 48 discusses the new tactics and strategies employed in World War II. Describes the targeting of civilian populations and the Nazi holocaust.
Online
1989
20.

The Cold War [electronic resource]

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Traces the events that led to the Cold war, including the U.S. funding of the redevelopment and defense of Western Europe and the formation of the Common Market. Discusses the confrontation of the United States and the Soviet Union in Korea.
Online
1989