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61.

The Meaning of "Everything": Responding to Patient Requests for Aggressive Treatment at the End of Life

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James A. Tulsky, M.D. (Director, Center for Palliative Care and Associate Professor of Medicine and Nursing; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University School Medicine) discussed the meaning of "everything" as heard in statements such as, "You are going to do everything for my Father, are'nt you?" Additionally, Dr. Tulsky reviewed the past decade of studies on communication, identified and listed barriers to change; and provided solutions to address requests that imply or directly ask for "everything" to be done to keep a person alive. Dr. Tulsky presented the NURSE Model of name, understand, respect, support, and explore the senstive situation of "doing everything" and almost certain impending death.
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
62.

Spiritual Issues in the Care of the Dying

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Daniel P. Sulmasy, O.F.M., M.D., Ph.D. (Sisters of Charity Chair in Ethics and Chair, John J. Conley Department of Ethics, St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center, Manhattan, and Professor of Medicine and Director, Bioethics Institute, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York) addressed three major questions that the hearing and thinking dying person is confronted with: value/dignity, meaning/hope, and relationship/reconciliation/closure. Dr. Sulmasy discussed in detail the meanings of these words/concepts, a need for consistency in naming/applying these moral words in discourse and writing, and where and how spirituality fits in with these three questions and the context of dying and what it means to be human.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
63.

Words That Harm, Words That Heal

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Susanna E. Bedell, M.D. (Lown Cardiovascular Center and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School) addressed the types of verbal and written communication that impacts good/healing communication between doctors and patients. Dr. Bedell described in depth the influences of the "letter of condolence" for both the deceased person's loved ones as well as for the physician him/herself. Eugene C. Corbett, M.D. (Division of General Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Care, University of Virginia) responded with comments on "medicine as craft," the importance of continuity of care, how to teach effective interviewing, the importance of the words that patients use with physicians, and the importance of words chosen for the closure of any situation.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
64.

Report From the Ukraine: Was the Presidential Election Fair?

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Heilman, a veteran international elections observer, described what an election observer does and spoke about his experience in the Ukrainian presidential election between Prime Minister Viktor F. Yanukovich and opposition leader Viktor A. Yushchenko. He also discussed the post-election situation there.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
65.

The Economist as Sleuth and the Economist as Novelist

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Dr. Elzinga, an economist who writes mystery novels, had three main points: to explain things about mystery writing, to discuss the economics of writing fiction, and to encourage people to publish novels. He discussed the methods of solving crimes and his use of economics in solving them, using his novel, A Deadly indifference, as an illustration.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
66.

Rape and Prosecution

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Ms. Fairstein, former chief prosecutor for the Sex Crimes Unit of the New York District Attorney's Office, talked about her experiences as a female lawyer, beginning when such lawyers could not try violent crimes. She gave a history of the prosecution of rape, including the changes in the kind of evidence allowed in these cases. She also talked about writing crime fiction.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
67.

Through the Kaleidoscope: Multiple Views in Fiction and Painting

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Novelist and short story writer, Ann Beattie, and her husband, artist Lincoln Perry discuss some of Perry's paintings and sculpture and Beattie's views on writing. Both have a mutual interest in narratives.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
68.

The Conquest of Pellagra

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Charles S. Bryan, M.D., MACP (University of South Carolina School of Medicine) presented the case that many people often contribute to medical discoveries, but one person is usually credited who comes along at a more propitious time. Dr. Bryan cites examples such as HIV/AIDS, Yellow Fever, and Pellagra. The case of pellagra is discussed at length as are the names Cesare Lombroso, George H. Searcy, James Woods Babcock, and Joseph Goldberger.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
69.

Richard Selzer's "Follow Your Heart" [Videorecording]: A Medical Readers' Theater Presentation

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The University of Virginia Medical Students present a reader's theatre production of surgeon Richard Selzer's story, "Follow Your Heart," adapted by Ann Bean. The play entails human emotions following an organ donation. Visiting Professor, Todd Savitt (Ph.D., Professor of Medical Humanities, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina), leads audience discussion after the play.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
70.

The Political Life of Medicare

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Jonathan Oberlander, Ph.D. (Department of Social Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) provided an "historical-political tour" of the development of Medicare and its original purposes. Dr. Oberlander ended with his speculations concerning the current "midlife" crisis regarding Medicare and the current political arena. William Plonk, M.D. (Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville) entitled his talk, "Why care about Medicare politics?" and he described how Medicare determines what our nation spends money on, what physicians get paid, what care patients recieve, and what standard of medical care is given.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
71.

The Honest Doctor and the Hopeful Patient

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David Schiff, M.D. (Department of Neurology, University of Virginia) outlined the difficult issues surrounding the disclosure of "bad news" and the need for creating a right setting and manner. David M. Bailey, Musician (Earlysville, Virginia) who was diagnosed with cancer ten years ago, intertwined his music (guitar and singing) along with his thoughts, experience, and lessons of being hopeful, discovering what hope is and is not, and asking questions such as "Why me?" and "What do I do now?"
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
72.

Never Ask Permission: Elisabeth Scott Bocock of Richmond

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In her talk about her mother, Elisabeth Scott Bocock, an upper class woman in Richmond, Ms. Hitz gave a brief family history, and spoke about her mother as a person during the times and social climate in which she lived. Ms. Hitz described the way her mother worked for historic preservation in Richmond.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
73.

Blues Biology

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Musician Corey Harris discusses the history of blues and describes how this music has been used to help alleviate human pain and illness. He sings and plays several musical selections during his presentation. Music performed includes: High fever blues, C. C. pill blues, Love is more precious than gold, Cat fish blues, and Didn't by Lord deliver David?
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
74.

Faith, Certainty, and the Presidency of George W. Bush

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Journalist Ron Suskind discussed the relationship of the White House to the press, and the work climate for the top employees in the Bush administration.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
75.

Homeless and Poor in America: Implications for Health and Health Care

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Dr. Hopper discussed methods for counting the homeless, types of health problems they encounter, etc. He stressed that the real problem was poverty, the underlying structure of getting basic needs met, especially in the area of housing. Ms. Ehrenreich discussed her experiences of trying to live on low wages while researching her book, Nickel and dimed, and the experiences of her co-workers during that period, especially concerning housing and health care.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
76.

Communicating Evidence for Informed Decision Making

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Ronald Epsten, M.D. (Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry) described the importance of communicating medical information. Dr. Epstein developed five points: (1) Information transfers into an ethical act, (2) Information transfer is inefficient with little concordance, (3) Information needs to be evidence-based , (4) Information is not enough and needs interpretation, and (5) Information transfer is a mutual responsibility between physician and patient. David Slawson, M.D. (Department of Family Medicine, University of Virginia) discussed and defined information mastery and its components: usefulness, validity, relevance, patient oriented evidence versus disease oriented evidence, and two important tools (a first aler [...]
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
77.

Dream Anatomies: The Cultural Meaning of Anatomical Representation

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Michael Sappol, Ph.D. (Curator-Historian, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) discussed the development of anatomical representation from imaginative and fictious in the 16th and 17th centuries to the more present times in which it is more precise and realistic. Virginia Taylor Lyons, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Medical Education, Department of Cell Biology, University of Virginia) talked about the transitions of dissection from public to private and then beoming more public again through such initiatives as the National Library of Medicine's "The Visible Human Project." Both speakers described our fascination with the body and its anatomical representation for study, art, and entertainment.
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
78.

Internal Bleeding: What We Need to Know and Do to Cure Our Epidemic of Medical Mistakes

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Robert M. Wachter, M.D. (Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, and Chief, Medical Service and Chair, Patient Safety Committee UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco CA, and William Parson Professor in Teaching Excellence, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia) described how current sophisticated and complicated technology used in health care has contributed to the epidemic of medical mistakes. Dr. Wachter presented a case from his book ("Internal Bleeding: The Truth Behind America's Terrifying Epidemic of Medical Mistakes") as illustration and proposed solutions for prevention. Margaret L. Plews-Ogan, M.D. (Associate Professor and Chief, Division of General Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Care, Department o [...]
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Ivy)
79.

Engineering Activity Back Into Our Everyday Lives

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Arthur Weltman, Ph.D. (Exercise Physiology Laboratories, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia) introduced the problem of American's physical inactivity. Glenn Gaesser, Ph.D. (Program in Kinesiology, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia) described some major points concerning research and characteristics of fit persons. Nancy McLaren, M.D. (Department of Pediatrics and Teen Health Center, University of Virginia) discussed problems with pediatric patients and solutions for a public health approach. Timothy Beatley, Ph.D. (Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture) talked about the role of planning and designing of neighborhoods and communities in relation to physical fitness and connection with the natural environment.
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
80.

Human Experimentation: From Tuskegee 1932 to Today

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Dr. Harper, last surviving health care worker from the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and retired U.S. government health care policy-maker and adviser, discusses the issue of clinical trials and human experimentation in medicine, especially as it relates to minorities. The impact of the Tuskegee study has resulted in the mistrust of minority people in clinical trials; however, medical research is needed for minorities in order to diagnose and treat them effectively.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)