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1.

Researchers Aim to Unlock Genetic Data Goldmine for Vital Medical Information (3/12/13)

Researchers in the San Francisco Bay area believe genetic tests will help them find the best ways to treat and potentially prevent illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease and breast and prostate cancers. Spencer Michels reports on a giant data bank that houses genetic information on 200,000 people as part of a groundbreaking study.
Online
2017; 2013
2.

Coping With Alzheimer’s: A Mother and Daughter Portrait of Long-Term Care (5/30/13)

After being diagnosed with Alzheimer's, professional artist Mary Wyant slowly lost her ability to paint and the ability to take care of herself. Ray Suarez examines the story of Mary and her daughter Rebecca, who is now her mother's legal guardian and primary caretaker, and the daily struggles of long-term care.
Online
2017; 2013
3.

Retirees Flock to Mexico for the Sun and the Health Care (12/28/09)

Thousands of Americans are increasingly traveling to resort towns like Puerto Vallarta in Mexico—not for vacation, but for the cheap health care. In many cases, reports Ray Suarez, they are receiving care they couldn't afford in the United States.
Online
2017; 2009
4.

Medicare Patients Aren't Getting Sicker or Older, But Doctors Are Charging More (9/17/12)

The Center for Public Integrity investigated how Medicare billing changed over the past decade and found doctors were billing at much higher rates. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Center for Public Integrity's Fred Schulte to understand why doctors are "upcoding" more and why electronic medical records could be driving higher prices.
Online
2017; 2012
5.

What's Causing a Shortage of Pediatric Cancer Drugs? (2/15/12)

While more than 250 drugs were declared in short supply in the U.S. this past year, the latest worries centered on one called Methotrexate, considered essential for children battling leukemia. Ray Suarez discusses the problem and latest developments with Dr. Peter Adamson of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
Online
2017; 2012
6.

Carl Zimmer Uncovers Our "Planet of Viruses" (6/24/12)

Planet of Viruses helps reshape our understanding of viruses and their role in every day existence. In this interview, author Carl Zimmer discusses the definition of a virus, antibiotic resistance, the prevalence of viruses, and more.
Online
2017; 2012
7.

Dr. David Kessler Delves Into the Mysteries of Food Cravings (6/16/09)

Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser talks to author Dr. David Kessler about overeating and what is behind people's cravings, the subject of his new book The End of Overeating.
Online
2017; 2009
8.

The Healing Power of Music (2/27/12)

An unconventional approach to recovery and coping, music therapy is a field of medicine capturing new attention due to its role in helping Gabrielle Giffords recover from a gunshot to the head. Correspondent Spencer Michels reports on the versatility of music in a medical setting as well as the difficulty of quantifying its effectiveness.
Online
2017; 2012
9.

New Scan May Enable Better Diagnosis and Treatment for Athletes' Brain Damage (1/23/13)

Jeffrey Brown talks with Dr. Gary Small of UCLA about how new procedures may enable doctors to identify serious head injuries in athletes and others and the grave importance of protecting our brains from physical trauma.
Online
2017; 2013
10.

In California, Facing Down a Family Physician Shortage (11/18/10)

In the latest in a series on health reform, Betty Ann Bowser reports from California on what's being done to inspire medical students to address a shortage of primary care doctors.
Online
2017; 2010
11.

Dr. Jerome Groopman: Second Opinion (6/8/00)

Dr. Jerome Groopmanshares personal experiences as a patient and physician in his book Second Opinions: Stories of Intuition and Choice in the Changing World of Medicine. In this interview, Groopman expands on the concepts of intuition and choice in medical care, patient participation, his personal experiences, and more.
Online
2017; 2000
12.

California City Considers Sugary Drink Tax (6/7/12)

A look at a controversial plan by the city of Richmond, California, to tax soda and other sugary drinks. Spencer Michels reports.
Online
2017; 2012
13.

Why Angelina Jolie Decided to Undergo Preventative Double Mastectomy (5/15/13)

In a New York Times op-ed, actress Angelina Jolie disclosed she had a preventative double mastectomy because she carries a greater genetic risk of developing breast cancer. Gwen Ifill talks with genetic counselor Beth Peshkin of Georgetown University and Dr. Kenneth Offit of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center in New York.
Online
2017; 2013
14.

Briana Scurry: Interview (7/2/14)

Briana Scurry, former goalkeeper for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team, discusses her experience with a career-ending concussion and her efforts to raise awareness of the concussions.
Online
2017; 2014
15.

Patience, Practice, and Presence: How Michael Pollan Fell in Love With Cooking

In the age of pre-packaged food, author Michael Pollan says the most important thing about your diet is the act of actually cooking it. Jeffrey Brown talks to Pollan about his new book, Cooked, which trumpets the gratification of home cooking and the importance of preserving it as a part of daily life.
Online
2017; 2013
16.

Giving Coal Country a Healthy Makeover (10/10/14)

One of the least healthy places in the United States is taking an unexpected shift toward better health. In West Virginia's coal country, a growing health gap is fueled in part by shrinking industry and prosperity. Hari Sreenivasan reports on how health workers and community leaders in Williamson are trying to turn that around with greater medical access, healthier food and a stronger economy.
Online
2017; 2014
17.

Art of War: Veterans Shred Uniforms to Create "Combat Paper" Artwork

In 2007, a returning Iraq war veteran, trying to make sense of his experience, cut up his uniform to make paper from its fibers. Five years later, the Combat Paper Project has found a home in New Jersey. Hoping to reconcile the good and the bad of lives spent at war, four veterans reflect on this therapeutic and artistic outlet.
Online
2017; 2012
18.

First Comprehensive Genetic Analysis of Breast Cancer Could Change Treatment (9/24/12)

Research published by Nature shows there are four distinct types of breast cancer and that genetic changes occurring as cancer cells spread are vastly different for each type. Judy Woodruff talks to National Cancer Institute's Dr. Harold Varmus for more on what the research could mean for treatment in the future.
Online
2017; 2012
19.

Dr. Jerome Groopman: How Doctors Think (5/15/07)

In his book How Doctors Think, Dr. Jerome Groopman provides insight onthe thought processesbehind decisions that doctors make and explores the important relationship between doctor and patient. In this interview, Groopman discusses why he wrote the book, the prevalence of misdiagnosis, and more.
Online
2017; 2007
20.

Study Finds That Half of U.S. Adults at Risk for Health Problems Related to Elevated Blood Sugar (9/15/14)

One out of three Americans over 20 is pre-diabetic, and another 29 million already have diabetes. According to a recent report, the risk for some cancers is 15 percent higher for someone with higher-than-normal blood sugar. Gwen Ifill speaks with Dr. David Nathan, director of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, about how to prevent high blood sugar levels.
Online
2017; 2014