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1.

Researchers Aim to Unlock Genetic Data Goldmine for Vital Medical Information (3/12/13)

Researchers in the San Francisco Bay area believe genetic tests will help them find the best ways to treat and potentially prevent illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease and breast and prostate cancers. Spencer Michels reports on a giant data bank that houses genetic information on 200,000 people as part of a groundbreaking study.
Online
2017; 2013
2.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr.: The Bondwoman’s Narrative (7/23/02)

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., discusses The Bondwoman's Narrative, which is described as an autobiographical novel written in the 1850s by a female slave who called herself and her main character Hannah Crafts. The manuscript was found at an auction of African American artifacts by Gates JR, who is credited as editor of the book.
Online
2017; 2002
3.

Governor Jack Markell: Hiring More People With Disabilities Is Good for the Bottom Line (8/2/13)

A new report from the National Governor's Association says states should do more to employ the 54 million Americans living with a disability, among whom only 20 percent are currently employed or looking for a job. Judy Woodruff interviews Delaware Governor Jack Markell about his push to boost accessibility to the labor market.
Online
2017; 2013
4.

Can Online Courses Replace a Campus Education? (8/27/14)

Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, that anyone can take from anywhere in the world are the future of higher education or the vehicle of its demise, depending on your perspective. Hari Sreenivasan talks with the man who first created the MOOC, professors who say they undermine the goals of a college education and others who see a way the college classroom and the new online format can be blended.
Online
2017; 2014
5.

How Abraham Lincoln Shaped American Politics and Popular Culture (2/20/12)

On this Presidents Day, Hari Sreenivasan and historian Richard Norton Smith discuss President Lincoln's influence on American politics and popular culture as they tour the Ford's Theatre's new Center for Education and Leadership dedicated to the president.
Online
2017; 2012
6.

Colorado Energy Battle: Coal vs. Natural Gas (8/8/12)

In Colorado, coal and natural gas producers are fighting for energy dominance. Ray Suarez reports on the battle in a state that's also weighing what will be the most sustainable energy solution for the future.
Online
2017; 2012
7.

This HBO Exec Endured Harassment as a Woman in the Film Industry. But Now, ‘Women Are Not Alone Anymore’

Sheila Nevins, the president of HBO Documentary Films, has been the target of sexual harassment like innumerable professional women across all industries. But with a groundswell of voices declaring #MeToo, Nevins sees hope for young women to escape the same treatment. She joins Judy Woodruff to speak out about her experience.
Online
2018; 2017
8.

Judith Jamison: Interview (2/14/90)

This interview features American dancer, choreographer, and Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Judith Jamison. Jamison discusses Alvin Ailey's message through dance, her purpose in the theater, the role of ethnicity in dance, and more.
Online
2017; 1990
9.

Why Generic Drugs Don’t Necessarily Mean Lower Prices (12/23/13)

NewsHour Weekend's Megan Thompson reports on the surprising disparity in pricing for generic drugs. Generics, generally thought to be less expensive, can actually vary widely in price from pharmacy to pharmacy, causing some to skip medications altogether.
Online
2017; 2013
10.

At Rikers Island, Investing in Decision-Making Lessons for Teens in Trouble (4/10/13)

Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on efforts to keep young people from returning to New York's Rikers Island once they've served their time. A privately financed pubic program utilizes evidence-based behavioral therapy to imbue teens with a sense of greater control over their lives and decisions.
Online
2017; 2013
11.

FDIC's Sheila Bair: Bank Bailouts Were "Not a Good Idea" (11/13/09)

In an interview with Paul Solman, FDIC chairwoman Sheila Bair discusses lessons learned from the financial crisis and looks back on the federal bailout of institutions deemed "too big to fail," saying, "In retrospect, I think it was not a good idea."
Online
2017; 2009
12.

Five Years Later, Scientists Still Puzzled by Honeybee Decline (7/28/11)

Five years ago, honeybees began dying in large numbers and hives were becoming defunct. Spencer Michels reports on the scientists who are still trying to figure out why this is happening and what can be done to help the problem.
Online
2017; 2011
13.

Has Fed Done All It Can to Prop Up U.S. Economy? (8/27/10)

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said that the central bank is prepared to take new action to help the sagging economy if needed. Jeffrey Brown talks to economists Paul Krugman and Douglas Holtz-Eakin about whether the Fed is doing enough to lift the economy.
Online
2017; 2010
14.

The Shah of Iran: Interview (11/14/77)

A 1977 interview with the Shah of Iran in which he discusses relations with the United States.
Online
2017; 1977
15.

Georgia Works Jobs Training Program: A Peach or the Pits? (10/12/11)

One provision of President Obama's jobs bill that has some bipartisan support is modeled after a program in Georgia that allows employers to try out workers for eight weeks on a volunteer basis while the person receives unemployment benefits and training. Paul Solman explores Georgia Works' pros and cons, plus its scalability.
Online
2017; 2011
16.

Book Offers Portrait of Prolific Photographer Who Captured Native American Lives (11/22/12)

Backed by Theodore Roosevelt, Edward Curtis set out in 1900 to document the lives of Native Americans. Over the next 30 years, he took more than 40,000 pictures and 10,000 audio recordings. Jeffrey Brown talks to Pulitzer Prize winner Timothy Egan about his new biography of Curtis, Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher.
Online
2017; 2012
17.

Online University Skips Class to Be More Accessible (8/25/14)

College for America, an online degree program, has no classes, professors or credit hours. It's been cited as an innovative way to make college more affordable. But how do its students qualify for a degree? Hari Sreenivasan reports from New Hampshire on a university that gives credit based on competency at the student's own pace.
Online
2017; 2014
18.

Tom Hanks on Hollywood’s Tipping Point Over Sexual Misconduct

What do the Harvey Weinstein allegations reveal about power and gender in Hollywood? When Tom Hanks recently sat down with Jeffrey Brown for a conversation about his first collection of short stories, the legendary actor also discussed whether Weinstein's behavior was an open secret in Hollywood.
Online
2018; 2017
19.

The Founder of #MeToo Doesn't Want Us to Forget Victims of Color

Millions of people have shared personal stories of sexual assault and harassment using the hashtag #MeToo. Now the woman behind the original Me Too campaign, created more than a decade ago, wants to make sure marginalized voices aren't lost in the conversation. Tarana Burke, the founder of the movement, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the viral explosion of her message and what comes next.
Online
2018; 2017
20.

Author Disconnects From Technology to Reconnect With Life (8/16/10)

William Power, author of Hamlet's Blackberry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age, talks about how he and his family disconnected from their communication devices in order to reconnect with life.
Online
2017; 2010