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1.

Anatomy of the Human Brain [electronic resource]

Neuropathologist Dr. Marco Rossi dissects and examines a normal human brain. Using three methods of dissection-coronal plane, CT-MRI plane, and sagittal plane-Dr. Rossi separates the hindbrain from the midbrain, and removes a portion of the brain containing the substantia nigra. The anterior and posterior of the forebrain are dissected, and each section is examined, along with the left occipital lobe. After separating the brain stem from the cerebellum, both are sectioned and examined.
Online
2005; 1997
2.

E. Coli [electronic resource]: Case of the Mysterious Microbe

In this factual case study, revelers at a Burns Day celebration in Scotland become ill. When E. coli is suspected, health officials conduct a medical manhunt to discover its source. They and researchers move cautiously from one possible cause to the next-the food served, the water drunk, improper food handling. When none of the investigations prove conclusive, suspicions mount that the microbe was probably passed on by someone sitting at the table where people became ill. During the program, researchers working on the case trace the evolution of the deadly 0157 E. coli strain from animals to ancient humans, and make connections between E. coli and diseases including flu and tuberculosis.
Online
2008; 1997
3.

Computer Architecture [electronic resource]

This technical program provides a step-by-step explanation of the infrastructure of computers and how they actually work. An overview of the processor includes discussions about how its interconnections make memory possible. Other topics include the bus and binary works and memory storage locations. Using excellent computer graphics, we see how the arithmetic and logic unit (ALU) adds two binary numbers, and how the information is stored. A discussion of the ALU and flags concludes the program.
Online
2006; 1997
4.

Culture of Human Fibroblasts [electronic resource]

This in-depth program shows how fibroblasts from the skin are isolated by using enzymes and then cultured in a nutrient medium. Detailed explanations of how cells can be re-seeded, counted, and cryopreserved for storage in liquid nitrogen for long periods of time are demonstrated. The importance of careful aseptic techniques and the use of sterile equipment is discussed.
Online
2010; 1996
5.

Monoclonal Antibodies [electronic resource]

Using computer graphics, this program illustrates the difference between monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. It describes how lymphocytes in the bloodstream respond to the appearance of an antigen by producing antibodies to it. Problems with antibodies from the blood are discussed along with Milstein's solution. A step-by-step procedure to obtain stable hybridomas, a hybrid cell produced by the fusion of an antibody-producing lymphocyte with a tumor cell, through the isolation of lymphocytes from the spleen is demonstrated.
Online
2005; 1997
6.

Computer Security [electronic resource]

Some data thieves break into PCs electronically from remote locations, while others walk right in the front door during business hours. This program addresses the vulnerability of data stored on hard drives, on file servers, on removable media, and in computer memory, as well as of data passed over the Internet. Case studies of both large and small companies provide an opportunity for computer security experts to explain measures that every company should take in order to protect its information assets. Fire walls, virus containment, encryption, authentication, access controls, and the development of a corporate culture of security are stressed.
Online
2005; 1999
7.

Diagnosing and Treating Cystic Fibrosis [electronic resource]

Divided into four segments, this program examines the presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and biochemistry of cystic fibrosis. Topics explored include chronic health problems associated with CF, the analysis of mutated genes through DNA sampling, the combined use of medication and physiotherapy to reduce damage, and the vital role of transmembrane regulators in passing chloride ions and water across cell membranes in the lungs. Computer graphics and endoscopic imagery enhance this informative educational resource.
Online
2007; 1998
8.

DNA Profiling [electronic resource]

What used to take two weeks currently takes only a day-and in the near future, will likely take mere minutes. In this concise program, Chris Hadkiss, senior scientist at the Forensic Science Service, explains the latest DNA extraction and quantification techniques. Detailed laboratory footage illustrates the processes of sample extraction, quantification, amplification, separation, and interpretation. In addition, Mr. Hadkiss provides background on the history of DNA profiling, sources of DNA for sampling, the difficulties associated with radioactive tagging as compared to fluorescent tagging, and the value of mitochondrial DNA analysis.
Online
2005; 1998
9.

An Overview of Investigative Interviewing [electronic resource]

What is the right way to interrogate victims, witnesses, and suspects? And, of equal instructive value, what is the wrong way? This program investigates both, as trained British actors apply the principles of cognitive interviewing, conversation management, and nonverbal communication in a series of unscripted Q-and-A sessions related to a purse-snatching. Segments dramatizing the incident from the victim's and witness's points of view are also included. In addition, film clips of a totally separate mugging are included-ideal for use as a witness/interrogator practice exercise.
Online
2006; 1998
10.

Interviewing Victims and Witnesses [electronic resource]

This program offers extended interviews selected from those featured in An Overview of Investigative Interviewing, providing viewers with a more detailed look at how cognitive interviewing, conversation management, and nonverbal communication are applied to interrogating victims and witnesses in the U.K. The victim interview is presented as a well-conducted interview, while the witness interview is designed to demonstrate flaws in technique.
Online
2006; 1998
11.

Interviewing Suspects [electronic resource]

This program provides extended interviews selected from those featured in An Overview of Investigative Interviewing, offering viewers a more detailed look at the processes involved in interrogating suspects. The first interview is considered to be well conducted, employing the techniques of cognitive interviewing, conversation management, and nonverbal communication, while the second interview contains errors in judgment. A careful analysis of each model helps students to assimilate these British methodologies for use in a real-world context.
Online
2006; 1998
12.

Bows, Arrows, and Aircraft Carriers [electronic resource]: Moving Bodies With Constant Mass

In this program, geometry is combined with approximation to solve relatively complex problems involving shooting an arrow and landing an airplane on the deck of an aircraft carrier. Emphasizing the value of sketching as a visualization tool, the program also explains how the solution of the archery problem, through geometric inversion, can help solve the problem of a plane landing.
Online
2006; 1999
13.

Impulse [electronic resource]: Moving Bodies With Variable Mass

Using Newton's second law and a balloon-powered toy car, this program examines how impulse relates to the change in momentum and how the rate of that change equates to the resultant force. In addition, the exhaust velocity of the jet-propelled car is estimated.
Online
2006; 1999
14.

Modeling Vectors [electronic resource]

Employing diverse examples such as trains and water slides, this program illustrates the use of vectors to represent forces operating in both two and three dimensions. The algebraic manipulation of vectors in modeling problems is featured.
Online
2006; 1999
15.

Kites [electronic resource]: Modeling With Vectors

After defining the basic concepts of vectors, this program uses algebra to determine how the resultant of numerous forces acting on a body can be obtained and then equated to the product of mass and acceleration. Kites are employed to exemplify both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions.
Online
2006; 1999
16.

Doors, Heart Valves, and Flic-Flacs [electronic resource]: Moments

After explaining the principle of moments, this program shows how apparently dissimilar physical phenomena are actually mathematically similar through the examples of a synthetic heart valve, a lock gate, and the gymnastic maneuver known as a flic-flac, or back handspring. The need to make careful approximations during the modeling process is stressed.
Online
2006; 1999
17.

Bikes and Cars [electronic resource]: Centripetal Acceleration

This program considers the idea that circular motion must imply a force or component of a force toward the center of a circle, as in the Newtonian theory of how the Moon orbits the Earth. The reasons why bicyclists lean during turns, why roads are banked, and why car tires react as they do during a turn are investigated.
Online
2006; 1999
18.

Damping [electronic resource]: Simple Harmonic Motion

This program investigates how the mathematical model of simple harmonic motion becomes more complex through the introduction of damping. The application of simple modeling techniques to create homogeneous linear second-order differential equations is illustrated.
Online
2006; 1999
19.

Parachuting [electronic resource]: Moving Bodies With Constant Mass

This program uses a parachutist to demonstrate the effects of drag on the force of gravity, showing how to make mathematical approximations and how the resultant forces can be equated to the product of mass and acceleration. A first-order differential equation is then used to find the minimum height from which a parachutist can jump without injury.
Online
2006; 1999
20.

Pathology Examples in the Human Brain [electronic resource]

Neuropathologist Dr. Marco Rossi examines different human brain specimens and presents evidence of trauma or disease. Brains examined include those of a 59-year-old woman with dementia; an 82-year-old man who suffered a road accident; a young man with a shunting tube for hydrocephalus; an elderly man with Parkinson's disease; an elderly female stroke victim; and a middle-aged woman with hemiplegia.
Online
2006; 1997