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1.

Teen Danger Zone [electronic resource]: Teens at Risk

Combining hard-hitting personal stories with cold facts, the first six segments of this chaptered program report on some of the most common drugs currently being abused by teens: OxyContin, PMA, Special K (ketamine), the methamphetamine Ice, inhalants, and, in the form of binge drinking, alcohol. The final segment focuses on hazing, a frequently outlawed form of initiation that, like substance abuse, speaks directly to the teenage desire to fit in with peers-sometimes at any cost.
Online
2006
2.

Cutting [electronic resource]: Addicted to Self-Injury

Like most addictions, this one starts as a way of coping with emotional pain. But cutting-the habit of self-injury on the rise among teenagers, especially girls-is a sign of deep-seated anxiety and self-hatred that no one can cope with alone. This video examines the distressing, ritualized behavior and explores how parents, friends, guidance counselors, and those who cut themselves can work together to stop it. The program goes inside a support group for young women struggling with the habit, showing them engaging in group discussions, self-expression exercises, and role-play that helps them let go of negative emotions and confront the "demon" of addiction.
Online
2006
3.

Mission [electronic resource]: Colombia

The United States is pumping a huge amount of aid money into the Colombian army. Is the goal to kill coca plants, or is it to destroy the FARC anti-government forces? Is FARC really more concerned with protecting the coca crop than the coca farmers? And could Colombia become another Vietnam? This brief program raises these pointed questions as it visits Colombian army and FARC training bases. An excellent discussion-starter!
Online
2006
4.

Children of Substance Abusers [electronic resource]

Danielle's father is an alcoholic, as are both of Luke's parents. Nicole's mother is recovering from crack cocaine addiction. How have these teenagers dealt with such overwhelming conditions? This video explores the emotional confusion and trauma affecting children of substance abusers, showing how many young people are able to break the cycle of addiction and create a healthy pattern for their own lives. Important steps in that process are featured-most importantly, realizing that your parent's problems come from his or her sickness and are not your fault. Self-worth, acceptance, forgiveness, and the concept of the "parentified" child are all explored.
Online
2006
5.

Diabetes [electronic resource]: Teens Fight Back

An obesity epidemic has swept America-leading to an alarming rise in diabetes cases. This video looks at the disturbing trend and illustrates how diabetic teenagers can lead rewarding lives instead of becoming passive victims. Interviewing two young men and following them through their daily routines, the program reveals the benefits of staying positive and active. Will-a high school student with Type 1 diabetes-maintains a rigorous injection and glucose-monitoring schedule while excelling at soccer and remaining focused on school and his social life. Justin, age 12 with Type 2 diabetes, talks about his struggle with weight control and his triumphant loss of 18 pounds.
Online
2006
6.

The Suffering of Sudan [electronic resource]

Darfur is dying. Drought and military violence in this region of Sudan have caused more than a million people to flee, and the death toll from starvation, disease, and militia attacks continues to rise. What, if anything, is being done to help the victims? This Peabody Award-winning program goes inside the Bredjing Refugee Camp in neighboring Chad, visits a tiny clinic run by Doctors Without Borders, and rides with the Sudan Liberation Army to give viewers a glimpse of what the UN is calling one of the worst humanitarian crises in the world.
Online
2006
7.

Homeless [electronic resource]: Teen Perspective

Filthy clothes, needle marks, panhandling.is this an accurate picture of teenage homelessness? Going behind common stereotypes, this video tells human stories about human beings-most of them young people who know homelessness firsthand. Amber and Tieshi describe the harsh reality of life on the street, clearly demonstrating the same needs, fears, and hopes that all teens have. Andy explains what it's like to live in a car and why homeless teens should never give up or lose hope. Cindy and others describe the effects of homelessness on families, while Liz Murray describes her personal journey from homeless teen to Harvard student and New York Times journalist.
Online
2006
8.

Illegal Immigration [electronic resource]: Dangerous Journey

For many teenagers in Mexico, heading across the U.S. border after high school is much more common than heading off to college. But as law enforcement continues to tighten security, that journey is growing more and more hazardous. Filmed on both sides of the border, this program briefly examines issues surrounding illegal immigration-particularly how much more a person can earn in America than in Mexico. Footage of a BORSTAR search-and-rescue officer hot on the trail of illegals in Arizona's Sonoran Desert emphasizes the dwindling chances of successfully crossing into America illegally.
Online
2006
9.

Parole [electronic resource]: Getting Out and Staying Out

Prison life is hard-but for most ex-convicts, life on the outside is tough, too. This video follows paroled prisoners as they re-enter civilian life and face challenges both large and small. Upon release from jail, the lives of these young men are suddenly filled with critical decisions. Some are dreaded, such as the split-second choice of whether or not to engage in violence-the wrong choice will put them back behind bars. Other dilemmas are unexpected, like having to decide what to wear every morning. The program provides an eye-opening look at the typical parolee's struggle to find work, stay away from drugs and former friends, and maintain a positive attitude about the future.
Online
2006
10.

Bullies [electronic resource]

In the U.S., an estimated 1.6 million students in grades six through ten are bullied one or more times per week-and as many as 150,000 victims cut classes each day just to avoid it. In this program, Dr. James Shaw, author of Jack and Jill: Why They Kill, explains how to confront and counter bullying in the nation's schools. Candid interviews with bullied students including Evan Ramsey, convicted of killing his school's principal and a classmate, as well as with two reformed bullies-one male, one female-provide a wide-ranging peer perspective on school violence. Students also share their successes as part of anti-bullying and peer mediation programs in their schools.
Online
2005; 2002
11.

Teen Pregnancy [electronic resource]: Reel Stories, Real Life

Being a teenager is difficult enough. Try being a parent at the same time! This program follows the stories of three young women with unplanned pregnancies-15-year-old Valerie, 17-year-old Karina, and 18-year-old Sara. The program also presents another couple, Amanda and Tomas, who have chosen abstinence. In three segments, the teens are interviewed over the course of their pregnancies and after they have become mothers. In this emotional roller-coaster, labor might be the least of their difficulties as Karina and Sara's boyfriends eventually walk out, Sara decides to put her baby up for adoption, and none of the young women return to school.
Online
2005; 2002
12.

North Korea [electronic resource]: Secret Nation

This undercover report documents the stark poverty and extreme repression in North Korea that exist alongside spectacular cultural events and age-old customs unfettered by political ideology. Posing as a tourist, broadcast journalist Janet Choi risked arrest to get an inside look at one of the planet's most secretive-and brutally totalitarian-countries while under surveillance by a police "tour guide." Archival footage, an interview with a defector, and commentary by Dr. Daniel Pinkston and Timothy McCarthy, both of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, provide additional insights into the country's history, culture, military posture, and living conditions.
Online
2005; 2002
13.

Megacities [electronic resource]

In 1950, New York City was the world's only megacity, but today there are nearly two dozen that qualify. This program travels to Sao Paulo, the world's third-largest megacity, to offer a glimpse of what it's like for the urban poor scraping out a living there. Visits to the slums and the streets of this 3,000-square-mile Brazilian metropolis paint a stark picture of a place where shootings, high levels of air and water pollution, and extreme traffic congestion continuously endanger the safety of its 18 million inhabitants.
Online
2006