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1.

About Time [electronic resource]

What is time? Did it have a beginning? Will it ever end? Is it something that humans have created, or does it exist independently of the universe? This intriguing program explores the meaning of time through the eyes of poets, philosophers, and scientists throughout the ages. In addition, it traces the development of time-measuring and time-keeping instruments, from sundials and calendars, to time zones and atomic clocks.
Online
2005; 1995
2.

Graphic Designer [electronic resource]

Graphic Designer is a twenty-minute video which is part of the series, Career Connections.The Career Connections video series gives viewers the opportunity to investigate various occupations without leaving the classroom. Each information-packed program contains interviews with workers and on-the-job footage to provide a comprehensive overview of these fast-paced, rewarding careers. Educational requirements, skills needed, safety considerations, advancement opportunities, and related occupations are all examined. More than just "a day in the life," these live-action programs provide students with a way to explore diverse occupations and get a feel for what it is like to be employed in each field. The last segment of each program provides a brief summary of how the Occupational Outloo [...]
Online
2008; 1993
3.

May I Help You? Commendable Customer Service [electronic resource]

This video teaches beginning workers how to provide good customer service through maintaining a good attitude, projecting positive body language, using the correct tone of voice, and developing rapport with the customer. Also explains and demonstrates proven techniques to placate angry customers. Better service leads to customer satisfaction and is good for both the career of the capable employees and future of the company.
Online
2006; 1992
4.

Missing Persons [electronic resource]: Drunk Driving Holocaust

This program brings the real-life consequences of mixing alcohol with driving into the classroom. Hard-hitting footage helps young adults realize the consequences of drunk driving, for the victim and the driver. Bereaved parents and friends, permanently disabled victims, and young inmates convicted of vehicular homicide explore the relationship between alcohol, death, and prison. Members of MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving), SADD (Students Against Drunk Driving), and CAR (Convicts After Recovery) discuss how the thoughtless act of driving drunk impacts people's lives.
Online
2005; 1992
5.

If I'm Elected [electronic resource]: Modern Campaign Techniques

Did our founding fathers envision today's political campaigns? Do political races serve our democratic ideals? How do candidates get voters to choose them? Viewers learn how running a campaign has turned from the noble pursuit our founders planned into a manipulative science. Although campaigns from the beginning suffered from negative rhetoric, in the age of television they have become even more harsh and a lot less truthful. Viewers learn about the fascinating roles played by political consultants and the powerful influence they have on candidates. They learn how campaigns control and manage news-media coverage and the significant role money plays in backing the candidate. This video takes students through noteworthy campaigns to look at and analyze why politicians seeking office s [...]
Online
2005; 1993
6.

Forms of Government [electronic resource]: What's the Score?

Welcome to Forms of Government: What's the Score?, also known as "the world's longest running game show. Today's contestants: Absolute Monarchy, Representative Democracy, Communism, Socialism, and Fascism. The categories are Power, Law and Order, Liberty and Personal Freedom, Social Contract, and Pix and Nix. Who will be the winner? It's up to the viewers to decide, as they judge the merits of the various contestants. As the "contestants" (each representing a different type of government) respond to questions from the host, viewers use a scorecard to rate each form of government on a scale of one to five. The game show format makes it easy to become familiar with the history and basic principles of these five forms of government. The scorecard activity provides a framework for viewer [...]
Online
2005; 1995
7.

Organizing America [electronic resource]: History of Trade Unions

Using interviews, personal accounts, and archival footage, this program investigates the major events in the history of American trade unions, from the formation of the first "friendly societies" in the 18th century, to the challenges posed by new technologies in the 1980s and 90s. Important issues such as minimum wages, health and safety conditions, discrimination, benefits, job security, and strikes are addressed. Veterans of labor struggles, labor historians, and business and government officials reveal fascinating personal insights into labor's sometimes violent origins, and how its influences have changed the workplace over the past 200 years.
Online
2005; 1994
8.

Dealing With Peer Pressure [electronic resource]: I Made My Choice

The friendships that are formed during adolescence provide teenagers with some of their fondest memories. Friendships can also influence individuals to do things that they normally wouldn't do. Actions that all too often have negative and far-reaching consequences. This informative video utilizes testimonials from students to examine the topic of adolescent peer pressure. It begins by focusing on the detrimental effects that occur by doing something only to be part of the crowd, losing self-control to the group, personal values conflicts, and being judged by the actions of the group. Positive self-esteem and personal decision-making are emphasized as effective methods for dealing with negative peer pressure. Students learn the importance of making their own decisions, setting positiv [...]
Online
2006; 1989
9.

How a Bill Becomes a Law [electronic resource]

This program deciphers the legislative process by explaining how an idea metamorphoses into a law. In interviews, prominent legislators and lobbyists explain how a bill is conceived, moved through the House and Senate or killed in committee, amended, prepared for a vote, and sent for the President or Governor's signature.
Online
2005; 1993
10.

Amendment 2 [electronic resource]: Right to Bear Arms

This program discusses the history of the "right to bear arms" Amendment. It details the controversy over the amendment as it relates to current gun control laws. Numerous court cases are cited as experts present both sides of the issue in this thorough and evenhanded analysis of the meaning of the 2nd Amendment.
Online
2007; 1998
11.

Amendment 3 [electronic resource]: Quartering of Troops

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
12.

Amendment 4 [electronic resource]: Unreasonable Search and Seizure

The origins and historical context of the 4th Amendment are outlined along with a detailed explanation of "probable cause" and search warrant contents and requirements. Present-day situations and court cases are cited to illustrate the main challenge of interpreting the 4th Amendment-how do we find the balance between protecting society from criminal behavior and upholding individual rights to privacy and freedom from unreasonable searches?
Online
2006; 1998
13.

Amendments 5 8 [electronic resource]: Justice Amendments

This program thoroughly analyzes the text of Amendments 5, 6, 7, and 8 to provide a complete understanding of the laws that are the foundation of the American criminal justice system. Specific rights outlined in the 5th Amendment that are explained include: the grand jury and indictment process, "double jeopardy," self-incrimination and "the right to remain silent," and due process of law. The rights guaranteed in the 6th Amendment for the accused in criminal prosecutions are discussed along with the procedures to be followed in criminal trials. The right of trial by jury in civil cases, bail procedures, and the elimination of excessive fines and cruel and unusual punishment as guaranteed in the 7th and 8th Amendments are discussed.
Online
2006; 1998
14.

Amendment 9 [electronic resource]: Reserved Rights of People

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
15.

Amendment 10 [electronic resource]: Powers Reserved to States

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
16.

Amendments 18 and 21 [electronic resource]: Prohibition and Repeal

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
17.

Amendment 19 [electronic resource]: Women's Right to Vote

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State on account of sex. The wording of the 19th Amendment is as unflinchingly clear as the obstacles to its passage-sexism; cultural, political, and social prejudices; and even timidity on the part of women reluctant to challenge the status quo. This program examines the struggle of the women's suffrage movement and its role in the eventual passage of the 19th Amendment. Legal experts discuss the amendment as a constitutional document and explain the changes it brought about in American life.
Online
2007; 1998
18.

Amendment 20 [electronic resource]: Terms of President, Vice President, and Congress

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
19.

Amendment 23 [electronic resource]: D.C. Voting

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
20.

Amendment 27 [electronic resource]: Congressional Pay Raises

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998