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1.

Cosmic Collisions

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DVD
2006
Alderman (US Documents (3 New)) Map
2.

Alien Invasion [electronic resource]

Sometime in the 1940s a brown tree snake hitched a ride aboard a U.S. Air Force plane in New Guinea traveling across the Pacific to the island of Guam. As a result, Guam lost all its native bird life. More recently, an African fungus crossed the Atlantic to cause a damaging disease in Caribbean coral, and the European gypsy moth has been steadily transforming America's forests. However, these occurrences are far from unique and are in fact becoming more common with each passing year. In Alien Invasion, a part of the PBS Scientific American Frontier series, host Alan Alda examines how globalization of trade and travel has brought increased threats from alien species: plants, animals, insects, and diseases that wreak havoc in defenseless regions.
Online
2001
3.

The Human Spark, With Alan Alda Part 1 [electronic resource]: Becoming Us

This episode centers on the caves and rock shelters of the Dordogne region of France, where Alan Alda witnesses the spectacular paintings and carvings that date back some 30,000 years. Archaeologists once thought this artwork to be the first record of people with minds like our own. When this art was created, Europe had already been peopled for hundreds of thousands of years by Neanderthals. The people who painted the caves, our ancestors, were strikingly different, possessed of the Human Spark. Where and when did the Human Spark ignite? In these caves, or at a much earlier time? This program is full of vigorously argued controversy, and of course the inimitable curiosity and humor of Alan Alda.
Online
2009
4.

The Human Spark, With Alan Alda Part 2 [electronic resource]: So Human, So Chimp

We are separated from our nearest relatives, the chimpanzees, by only one or two percent of our genes - but also by some six million years of going our different evolutionary ways. So we are aware that their minds are very different from our own. In this episode Alan Alda sets out to explore that difference, and finds that some scientists studying chimps and other non-human primates see the continuity between us, others emphasize the differences. Alan challenges the arguments of both sides in the debate. Yes, we have much in common with chimps, but what about that one or two percent difference in our DNA? Does this mask not a tiny difference but an evolutionary chasm?
Online
2009
5.

Unforgivable Blackness Part 2 [electronic resource]: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson - a Film Directed by Ken Burns

By the end of 1910, as the second part of this film begins, Jack Johnson was the most famous - and the most notorious - African-American on earth. But when no one was able to beat the champion in the ring, the U.S. government set out to destroy him in the courts. Unfairly charged with violating the Mann Act, Johnson was convicted and sentenced to jail. Skipping bail, he fled to Europe, where he remained a fugitive for many years. Determined to live his life regardless of the confines imposed by his color, Jack Johnson emerged as a central figure in America's ongoing struggle to deal with the question of race.
Online
2005
6.

Richard Wright's Almos' a Man [electronic resource]

Although Dave (LeVar Burton) and his family are poor sharecroppers in the Deep South in the 1930s, this 15-year-old's problem is shared by teenagers in every era: he stands with one foot in adulthood and the other in childhood. "Almos' a man" yet still treated like a child, Dave struggles for an identity - and there's one thing, one symbol of manhood, he thinks, that could guarantee him instant respect: a gun. Dave finds a way to buy a pistol, and once he pulls the trigger for the first time, never again will they call him a boy - But he trembles, the gun overpowers the young man's body, he loses control - and his life is forever changed.
Online
1976
7.

Rainforest [electronic resource]: The Secret of Life

Beautiful, complex, and enigmatic, rainforests are time capsules from the ancient Earth. They carry the genetic inheritance of millions of years of evolution, and although they are home to half the world's living species, much of their elaborate web of life is still waiting to be discovered. Filmed in woodlands on the slopes of Australia's Mount Warning, this program provides a stunning example of rainforest habitat as it examines the area's unusual wildlife. Viewers are treated to detailed and awe-inspiring scenes of the Albert's lyrebird mimicking the calls and sounds of other species, the regent bowerbird undergoing its elaborate mating rituals, a carpet python hunting and preying as only it can, the caper white butterfly in various life stages, and much more. A gorgeous explorati [...]
Online
2008
8.

Economic Gaps [electronic resource]

Welcome to Beverly Hills, California, where some of America's wealthiest citizens have created their own personal versions of paradise. But don't get too comfortable-this program whisks viewers off to Mexico City and Lilongwe, Malawi, as well, showing how different life can be in all three parts of the world and how globalization has amplified the economic gaps between them. In addition, the film provides an extensive analysis of the development of the global economy through compelling historical narratives-including the Spanish colonization of Central America, spearheaded by Hernan Cortes in an effort to find cheap trading silver, and the crucial role of child labor and forced trade agreements in the rise of British economic might.
Online
2009
9.

Our Expanding Universe [electronic resource]

Our understanding of the Universe and the technology used to observe it is constantly evolving. When Edwin Hubble discovered that the Universe was expanding in 1929 with galaxies becoming increasingly distant from one another, scientists reasoned that the gravitational attraction between galaxies would slow the expansion rate of the Universe. But then in 1998 two teams of scientists discovered that the expansion rate of the universe was not in fact slowing down but that it was actually accelerating. This discovery created one of the largest cosmological conundrums of our day: what is causing the Universe to accelerate? This science bulletin travels to Lick Observatory and Fermilab, where scientists are working to untangle the mystery of cosmic acceleration.
Online
2010
10.

Cloning and Conservation [electronic resource]

On January 8, 2001, on the outskirts of Sioux Center, Iowa, the first successful clone of an endangered species was delivered by cesarean section from an ordinary cow named Bessie. Noah, the new-born gaur (a species of wild ox native to India) was created by fusing cryogenically preserved skin cells from a zoo gaur with a cow egg emptied of its DNA. The entire procedure was done without ever coming into contact with a living gaur. This science bulletin asks the important question, "Can technology help save endangered species?
Online
2001
11.

Jellies Down Deep [electronic resource]

Increasingly, marine researchers are finding that there are far more jellies and jellyfish in the world's oceans than previously believed. Indeed, these creatures may play an unexpectedly large role in ocean ecosystems. This science bulletin, which features spectacular underwater footage, follows scientists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute as they retrieve jellies from the deep.
Online
2004
12.

Species and Sprawl [electronic resource]: A Road Runs Through It

As urban and suburban sprawl continue to spread across the country, road mortality has been found to be a major factor in the decline of turtle populations throughout the Northeast. This science bulletin visits the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, where, in the hopes of informing future development, researchers are radio-tracking wood turtles to better quantify their movement patterns and habitat needs.
Online
2005
13.

Lemurs in Madagascar [electronic resource]: Surviving on an Island of Change

On the world's fourth-largest island, and virtually nowhere else, lives an entire "infraorder" of primates: the three dozen or so lemur species. But Madagascar has radically transformed since another primate - humans - arrived 2,000 years ago. Rampant deforestation, habitat fragmentation, and other anthropogenic factors are impacting lemurs much faster than evolution can mitigate the effects. This science bulletin follows American and Malagasy scientists through the country's remaining forests to learn how these compelling creatures are coping with change.
Online
2006
14.

Wild at Heart [electronic resource]: The Plight of Elephants in Thailand

Elephants in Thailand have traditionally been captured in the wild and trained to work in the logging industry. However, with Thailand's ban on logging in 1989, elephants and their keepers lost a crucial source of employment and means of survival. In addition, loss of habitat is further challenging the survival of elephants. This science bulleting travels to northern Thailand to take a look at a project that may be able to help: an experiment in which elephants are returned to the forest to see whether they can form new family groups and survive on their own in the wild.
Online
2007
15.

Acid Oceans [electronic resource]

If you're an ocean creature with a hard shell - like a sea urchin, a hermit crab, or a coral polyp - you prefer ocean water with a pH of about 8.2. This chemistry makes it easy to assemble your armor from carbon-based building blocks dissolved in the ocean. Since the beginning of the industrial age, though, the ocean has been absorbing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the air. The increase in carbon dioxide has made the ocean's pH more acidic, dropping to 8.05 on average. Biologists like Gretchen Hofmann are realizing that this tiny change is hampering the development of hard-shelled marine creatures, leaving them more vulnerable to environmental stressors. This science bulletin joins Hofmann's team as they use a an acidic ocean environment in a lab at the University of Califor [...]
Online
2008
16.

The Ecology of Climate Change [electronic resource]

The boreal biome, the sweeping band of conifer forest just south of the Arctic Circle, is a key region for studying climate change - and not just the impacts. Certainly, with boreal forest fires growing more frequent and boreal permafrost melting dramatically, the area is responding very visibly to the rise of carbon in the atmosphere. Yet the trees and permafrost themselves are vast reservoirs of carbon. Ecologists like Scott Goetz of the Woods Hole Research Center and Ted Schuur of the University of Florida are keen to understand how climate change is altering the way the boreal biome adds to and takes up carbon from the atmosphere. This science bulletin highlights ongoing experiments in Alaska that aim to unravel these complex feedbacks so scientists can better predict outcomes as [...]
Online
2010
17.

Reading the Rocks [electronic resource]: The Search for Oil in ANWR

Less than 100 miles from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is Prudhoe Bay, North America's largest oil field. In section 1002 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, which created ANWR, Congress deferred a decision regarding future management of 1.5 million acres of North Slope coastal plain (called the 1002 area) in recognition of the area's potential as an oil and gas reserve as well as its significance as a unique wildlife habitat. As global fears of a disrupted and dwindling oil supply mount, the debate over the fate of the 1002 area is raging. The option of opening ANWR to oil leasing has become a political hot potato - hardly a climate conducive to calmly weighing the information and options that lie ahead. Political rhetoric aside, the evidence provide [...]
Online
2002
18.

Quakes From Space [electronic resource]: Studying Earthquakes in the Satellite Age

In recent years, scientists have begun using satellite technology to study earthquakes from space. By monitoring the tiniest movements of the Earth's crust, they are zeroing in on the spots where strain is building up and the crust will most likely snap. As this science bulletin illustrates, these efforts could help California residents protect the areas at greatest risk before the next big quake strikes.
Online
2003
19.

The Rise of Oxygen [electronic resource]: Evolution of Earth's Atmosphere

Oxygen is key to Earth's success as a habitable planet. But where did it come from? And when and how did it begin to transform the early atmosphere? This science bulletin explains how scientists are coming to understand oxygen's origins - not by studying ancient air, but by retracing its impact on Earth's surface.
Online
2004
20.

The War of 1812 [electronic resource]

The place: just outside the Virginia Capes. And the year: 1807. An American frigate, the Chesapeake, has been fired on and boarded. Four sailors are taken off the Chesapeake to the British ship Leopard and impressed into English naval service. Britain, at war with France, faced the conqueror of Europe Napoleon Bonaparte. English ships hovered off American ports ready to seize vessels and cargo destined for France. So began the sequence of events that led to the War of 1812, a conflict described in this film largely through illustrations and graphics and with an emphasis on naval actions. "Men and ships of 1812: fighting defenders of our great, free republic!
Online
2008