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1.

God's Earth [electronic resource]: Call for Environmental Stewardship

This program, narrated by Catholic priest, ecologist, and author, Paul Collins, presents a well-rounded, intellectual discussion of the Judeo-Christian elevation of humankind at the expense of nature and the environment. Beginning with Plato and his emphasis on the spiritual, theologians and ecologists trace the philosophy as it veers toward increasingly anthropocentric ideas. The Bible's mandates for humans to "Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it" are discussed within the context of overpopulation and pollution. The entire discussion is presented as a philosophical, ethical, and practical challenge to modern western religions to accept their role as stewards of the environment.
Online
2006; 1997
2.

Cure From the Crypt [electronic resource]: Fighting Tuberculosis, Again

When a crypt containing 200 extraordinarily preserved bodies was discovered in 1994 in the Hungarian town of Vac, it caught the interest of a scientist fighting tuberculosis on the other side of the globe. This program presents the fascinating story of Professor Mark Spigelman, an Australian surgeon turned archaeologist who is using ancient DNA to contend with the biggest bacterial killer in the world today. In what many call the post-antibiotic era, Spigelman's unique genetic research has yielded encouraging results: all the tubercular mummies were missing a TB-resistant gene in their genome; those mummies without TB had the gene.
Online
2006; 2000
3.

Indonesia at the Crossroads [electronic resource]

In Indonesia, activists seek to return their country to its traditional moral values after a period of rapid economic growth that resulted in rampant nepotism and corruption under President Suharto. As Muslim students and Hindu priests work to revitalize Indonesia while preserving a democratic ideal, this thought-provoking program provides an in-depth portrait of a country seeking to redefine itself within a historical context of religious tradition and tolerance.
Online
2007; 1998
4.

Bosnia's Rite of Return [electronic resource]

What is it like when tens of thousands of refugees return home from several years of exile to rebuild their lives? In this program, Muslim refugees from the village of Stolac describe the challenges of living with their wartime enemies; Croat refugees, preparing to celebrate Easter, seek guidance from a clergy that is itself divided between a desire for reconciliation and a belief in racial supremacy; and Bosnia's major religious leaders in Sarajevo discuss the struggle to keep the nation's multi-ethnic society alive.
Online
2007; 1998
5.

In the Beginning [electronic resource]: So You Want to Write a Story

After the pen and paper have been gathered, what comes next? In this program, Fay Weldon, Janet Evanovich, Richard Ford, Amit Chaudhuri, Isobelle Carmody, and other highly regarded authors share their approaches to launching a story. From how to jumpstart the imagination to deciding whether to write for a specific market, these writers candidly speak their minds-even about the dreaded writer's block. "If you stop [writing] and start artistically contemplating how desolate you are at stopping, of course you're going to come to a writer's block," says Carmody.
Online
2006; 2000
6.

Crafting the Story [electronic resource]: Beginnings, Middles, and Ends

How important is the opening line of a book? Does a writer always have to know what is going to happen next? Where should the line be drawn between historic fact and historical fiction? And what are the particular challenges of writing a biography? Drawing on the expertise of Edvard Radzinsky, Fay Weldon, Anson Cameron, John Lanchester, Nicholas Shakespeare, and other respected authors, this program answers each question with candor and wit-and judging from the authors' responses, there are as many ways to approach storywriting as there are writers.
Online
2005; 2000
7.

Creating Characters [electronic resource]: Essence of Writing

In the world of literature, weak plots are lamentable, but weak characters are fatal. "You've got to be involved with them," says Vikram Seth. "You can't find them boring. If you find them boring, forget it. Gathering the insights of Seth, Dorothy Dunnett, Emma Tom, Neal Drinnan, Claire Messud, and other experienced authors, this program spells out the essentials of characterization, from creating realistic dialogue to developing a character's personality. The pros and cons of basing a character on a real person are weighed as well.
Online
2005; 2000
8.

Lights Up! [electronic resource]: Getting Started as a Playwright

In this program, Andrea Lemon, Timothy Daly, Katherine Thomson, David Williamson, and other theater professionals describe what it was that prompted them to set pen to paper and write their first plays. They also explain how writing for the stage differs from other types of writing, give their opinions on the qualities needed to succeed as a dramatist, and offer advice on how to begin the writing process. "Practice the art of enticing the imagination of the public," says Daly. "It often starts with a title.
Online
2006; 2000
9.

Get It on! Working Your Way to Opening Night [electronic resource]

Rewrites and rehearsals are the final steps of crafting a play. But how does a playwright interest a theater company in the first place? In this program, Richard Wherret, Alana Valentine, Will Dunne, Ros Horin, and other theater professionals examine the process of rewriting and the role of the playwright in rehearsals-as well as how to sell a play in the drama marketplace. Common pitfalls of writing for the stage are also addressed, along with the benefits and drawbacks of writing for other mediums, such as film and TV. The key to success as a playwright? "Write from the heart," says Wherret.
Online
2006; 2000
10.

A Common Heritage [electronic resource]

What can the Dead Sea Scrolls tell modern theologians about 1st-century Judaism and the roots of Christianity? Drawing on the experiences of Frank Moore Cross, of Harvard University; Emanuel Tov, chief editor of the Dead Sea Scrolls Publication Project; James Charlesworth, of Princeton Theological Seminary; and other experts, this program describes the battle for open access to the scrolls while exploring the common heritage that links both faiths. In addition, Barbara Thiering airs her radical hypothesis. Footage of the Pope in Jerusalem and readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls Beatitudes and the Thanksgiving Scroll are included.
Online
2006; 2000
11.

Passing the Bug [electronic resource]: End of Antibiotics?

Today's antibiotics are quickly losing their ability to combat bacterial infections. What has caused this pharmacological disaster? This program examines the link between the use of antibiotics in livestock as growth promoters and the rise of resistance to their effectiveness in humans. Although certain classes of antibiotics have already been banned in agricultural use, some authorities are fighting further bans because they deny the food chain link to people. In Japan, Australia, and the United States, a strain of golden staph has appeared that is resistant even to vancomycin. If antibiotics-the wonder drugs that brought tuberculosis and pneumonia under control-have lost their potency, how vulnerable is society? How many will die as a result?
Online
2009; 1998
12.

High Speed Impact [electronic resource]: Hidden Toll

Fatalities are the most tragic outcome of auto accidents, but in societal terms, injuries involving irreversible brain damage may exact a higher toll. In this program, a team of the auto industry's leading researchers reconstruct an actual side-impact crash to explore what happens to the human brain in a collision. Specialized crash-test dummies, high-speed X-ray cameras, and computer simulations are used to capture crucial information. The dangers of four-wheel drive vehicles, particularly SUVs, are also examined as part of ongoing initiatives to improve design safety.
Online
2006; 2003
13.

Peter Singer [electronic resource]: Dangerous Mind

Dr. Peter Singer has been called the most influential living philosopher. He has also been called a monster. In this thought-provoking program, he faces his critics and discusses his ideas on euthanasia, abortion, and infanticide. The program follows his worldwide tour of lectures and encounters, including case conferences and a trip to Austria, where most of his family was killed in the Holocaust. A range of commentators consider his utilitarian stance and its impact on public policy, including Wesley J. Smith, a bioethicist and attorney with International Task Force on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide; Raimond Gaita, professor of moral philosophy at London University; and Harold T. Shapiro, former president of Princeton University, where Dr. Singer teaches.
Online
2005; 2003
14.

Tomorrow's Islam [electronic resource]

Both in principle and historically, Islam is a pluralistic and progressive faith. Unfortunately, world events involving extremist groups and fundamentalist regimes have projected a distorted image of the religion into the West. In this program, devout Muslim intellectuals-Ridwan al-Killidar, of the Al Khoei Foundation; Baroness Pola Manzila Uddin, the first Muslim woman to sit in Britain's House of Lords; the "Muslim Martin Luther," Tariq Ramadan; fiery Brookings scholar Muqtedar Khan; and others-correct misconceptions while envisioning an Islam that is at home in a modernized, interconnected world: one that retains the best of the tradition while embracing ijtihad, individual reformist thinking, to adapt the religion to the 21st century.
Online
2006; 2003
15.

Radioactivity [electronic resource]: How Much Can the Body Take?

In a millisecond, on July 16, 1945, the evolution of the human species took a remarkable turn. Until the explosion of the world's first nuclear weapon, the human body coexisted, if uneasily, with natural sources of radioactivity from the sky, rocks, and other unavoidable sources. Now, with x-rays and nuclear medicine a part of our daily lives, the issue has become just how much radioactivity our bodies can safely absorb. This program explores the question, and whether there is really such a thing as a healthy dose.
Online
2006; 1997
16.

Significant Others [electronic resource]: Rest of Theatrical Team

By its very definition, a play is a group project. This program, which features Nick Enright, Ros Horin, Timothy Daly, David Williamson, and other theater professionals, introduces some of the "significant others" of the drama profession: the actors, directors, dramaturges, composers, and designers who work with playwrights to polish their scripts and bring their stories to life. "Part of the learning process of collaboration," says Enright, "is learning to edit, learning to sift those responses, and..having the humility to listen in the first place.
Online
2006; 2000
17.

The Mythic Camera of Frank Hurley [electronic resource]

One of the last of the renowned imperial adventurers, Frank Hurley captured the first images ever seen of some of the world's most inhospitable and uncharted territories. But historians now know that some of "Captain Hurley's" photos were elaborate concoctions-and a few were outright fakes. This stimulating program follows Hurley's footsteps in the early 1900s to the Antarctic, Belgium, Papua New Guinea, Israel, and Australia to see if he was a giant of photography or a conjurer with a camera. His snapshots of Antarctic heroes, world wars, and mysterious natives in faraway jungles seized the imagination of all who saw them. But were those images transformed in the darkroom to the level of myth?
Online
2006; 2004
18.

Spare Parts [electronic resource]: Growing Human Organs

In this fascinating program, experts on the cutting edge of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine present the astounding results of their research. Academic experts from MIT, Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, Duke University, and the University of Toronto-plus representatives of Osiris Therapeutics and Geron, leading industry pioneers-explain how new organs, arteries, ligaments, tendons, and skin are being grown from scratch using embryonic stem cells and bone marrow cells, bio-reactors, biodegradable scaffolding, and telomerase. Ethics issues and the race for patents are discussed as well.
Online
2005; 1999
19.

Japanese Education in Crisis [electronic resource]

This documentary explores sobering developments linked to Japan's emphasis on intense academic pressure and conformity: 2,000 teen suicides per year, a 60 percent increase in crime since 1994, and the phenomenon of hikikomori children-those who have collapsed emotionally and withdrawn from society. Gritty footage shot in chaotic classrooms and dysfunctional homes, combined with commentary from counselors, parents, and dispirited young people, depicts a nation unprepared for radical social change and, in spite of recent educational reforms, lacking a consensus on whether to crack down or loosen up.
Online
2006; 2003
20.

Televangelism in Brazil [electronic resource]

Until recently, Brazil was the world's most populous Catholic nation-until the Pentecostal Protestants began a televangelical campaign that has resulted in a national identity crisis. This program examines the TV ratings war between the Pentecostals and the Catholics, whose Charismatics are countering with television programming of their own. Additional insights are offered by Liberation theologian Leonardo Boff.
Online
2007; 1998