Item Details

Breaking the Wall of Quantum Cinema [electronic resource]: How High-Speed X-Ray Lasers Will Allow Us to Make Life Reports From Molecules at Work and From Chemical Reactions

Falling Walls Foundation
Format
Video; Computer Resource; Online Video; Online
Summary
Taking X-rays beyond the limitations of the mid-1980s, Helmut Dosch has developed an "optical trick" that offers insight into the molecular structure of surfaces and interfaces. Dosch gained prominence through his research on synchrotron radiation contributing to the use of X-ray scattering as a method in surface science, order-disorder phenomena in condensed matter, fluctuations in matter, and nano-oxidation. In this 2010 video of a Falling Walls Conference lecture, Dosch discusses work that promises to make a landmark contribution to the scientific panorama by rendering the premelting of ice well below zero degrees centigrade. Currently the chairman of the DESY board of directors and an advisor to several renowned institutions including the Minerva-Weizmann Committee and the editorial board of EPL (formerly Europhysics Letters), Dosch's most recent breakthrough promises to be of utmost importance in an age of environmental degradation as it implies the existence of water under extrem
Release Date
2010
Run Time
15 min.
Language
Closed-captioned
Rating
12 & up
Notes
  • Encoded with permission for digital streaming by Films Media Group on August 24, 2012.
  • Films on Demand is distributed by Films Media Group for Films for the Humanities & Sciences, Cambridge Educational, Meridian Education, and Shopware.
Variant Title
How High-Speed X-Ray Lasers Will Allow Us to Make Life Reports from Molecules at Work and from Chemical Reactions
Contents
  • From Röntgen to the Present (4:43)
  • Chemical Reaction (3:07)
  • Nano World of Molecules (2:36)
  • Snapshots of Molecular Reactions (3:58)
Published
New York, N.Y. : Films Media Group, [2012], c2010.
Publisher no.
49394 Films Media Group
Access Restriction
Access requires authentication through Films on Demand.
Description
1 streaming video file (15 min.) : sd., col.
Mode of access: Internet.
System requirements: FOD playback platform.
Technical Details

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    a| Taking X-rays beyond the limitations of the mid-1980s, Helmut Dosch has developed an "optical trick" that offers insight into the molecular structure of surfaces and interfaces. Dosch gained prominence through his research on synchrotron radiation contributing to the use of X-ray scattering as a method in surface science, order-disorder phenomena in condensed matter, fluctuations in matter, and nano-oxidation. In this 2010 video of a Falling Walls Conference lecture, Dosch discusses work that promises to make a landmark contribution to the scientific panorama by rendering the premelting of ice well below zero degrees centigrade. Currently the chairman of the DESY board of directors and an advisor to several renowned institutions including the Minerva-Weizmann Committee and the editorial board of EPL (formerly Europhysics Letters), Dosch's most recent breakthrough promises to be of utmost importance in an age of environmental degradation as it implies the existence of water under extrem
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Availability