Item Details

From Stonehenge to Mycenae: The Challenges of Archaeological Interpretation

by John C. Barrett and Michael J. Boyd
Format
Book
Published
London, UK ; New York, NY : Bloomsbury Academic, 2019.
Language
English
Series
Debates in Archaeology
ISBN
9781474291897 (hbk.), 9781474291910 (ePDF), 9781474291903 (ebook)
Summary
"We live today in an interconnected world and we are inclined to believe that in earlier times the connections were less extensive and that communities were more isolated from each other. This book looks at the Europe that began to emerge some 4,000 years ago with the beginnings of metallurgy and the debates that have taken place concerning the scales of connections that existed then. Around this time Stonehenge was built from materials that were brought across huge distances. To what extent did geographically extensive connections exist, how might we recognise them and what, if any, were their consequences? Disagreements over these questions have existed in archaeology for nearly a century and yet they have profound implications for the ways in which we understand the dynamics of historical development in general. By examining the way one claimed connection between the Aegean and Western Europe was used to explain changes in Western Europe as the result of the rise of civilisation in the Aegean, and the ways that this explanation was challenged in the 1960s, we learn something about the nature of archaeological reasoning. The authors question common assumptions concerning the relationships between so-called civilised and barbarian societies, and ask their readers to consider what might drive change in social, cultural and economic systems"--
Contents
  • Preface / by Colin Renfrew
  • Archaeological approaches to Stonehenge
  • The emergence of an Aegean civilisation
  • Living with things : the politics of identity
  • Things that mattered : identity in the production, exchange and use of materials
  • Places that mattered : movement and belonging
  • Bodies that mattered : the role of the dead.
Description
pages cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Technical Details

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    a| Preface / by Colin Renfrew -- Archaeological approaches to Stonehenge -- The emergence of an Aegean civilisation -- Living with things : the politics of identity -- Things that mattered : identity in the production, exchange and use of materials -- Places that mattered : movement and belonging -- Bodies that mattered : the role of the dead.
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