Item Details

Child Custody in Islamic Law: Theory and Practice in Egypt Since the Sixteenth Century

Ahmed Fekry Ibrahim, McGill University
Format
Book
Published
Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2018.
Language
English
Series
Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization
ISBN
9781108470568, 1108470564
Summary
Pre-modern Muslim jurists drew a clear distinction between the nurturing and upkeep of children, or "custody", and caring for the child's education, discipline, and property, known as "guardianship". Here, Ahmed Fekry Ibrahim analyzes how these two concepts relate to the welfare of the child, and traces the development of an Islamic child welfare jurisprudence akin to the Euro-American concept of the best interests of the child, enshrined in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Challenging Euro-American exceptionalism, he argues that child welfare played an essential role in agreements designed by early modern Egyptian judges and families, and that Egyptian child custody laws underwent radical transformations in the modern period. Focusing on a variety of themes, including matters of age and gender, the mother's marital status, and the custodian's lifestyle and religious affiliation, Ibrahim shows that there is an exaggerated gap between the modern concept of the best interests of the child and pre-modern Egyptian approaches to child welfare.
Contents
  • Part I. Child custody and guardianship in comparative perspective
  • Child custody in civil and common law jurisdictions
  • The best interests of the child in Islamic juristic discourse
  • Part II. Ottoman-Egyptian practice, 1517-1801
  • Private separation deeds in action
  • Ottoman juristic discourse in action, 1517-1801
  • Part III. The transition into modernity
  • Child custody in Egypt, 1801-1929
  • Twentieth- and twenty-first-century child custody, 1929-2014.
Description
ix, 266 pages ; 24 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 239-256) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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