Item Details

The Prominence of Tense, Aspect, and Mood [electronic resource]

Shankara Bhat, D. N; Ebook Central - Academic Complete
Format
EBook; Book; Online
Published
Ipswich : Ebsco Publishing
Language
English
ISBN
9789027298737, 9027298734 (E-Book)
Summary
Annotation
Description
Mode of access: World wide Web.
Logo for Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

  • LEADER 02334nam a22003012 4500
    001 u7178035
    003 SIRSI
    005 20170608061650.0
    006 m d
    007 cr n
    008 101101nuuuuuuuumau s|||||||| ||eng|d
    020
      
      
    a| 9789027298737
    020
      
      
    a| 9027298734 (E-Book) c| USD 158.00 Retail Price (Publisher) 9| Active Record
    035
      
      
    a| (WaSeSS)ssj0000283189
    037
      
      
    b| 00326058
    040
      
      
    a| BIP US d| WaSeSS
    050
      
    0
    a| P281.S49 1999
    100
    1
      
    a| Shankara Bhat, D. N. e| Author
    245
    1
    4
    a| The Prominence of Tense, Aspect, and Mood h| [electronic resource]
    260
      
      
    a| Ipswich : b| Ebsco Publishing
    520
    8
      
    a| Annotation b| The book puts forth an exciting hypothesis for the typologist. Its major claim is that languages can generally be regarded as belonging to a tense-prominent, aspect-prominent or mood-prominent language type. This grouping can be based upon the relative prominence that languages attach to one or the other of the three verbal categories, namely tense, aspect and mood, by grammaticalizing the chosen category to a greater degree than others, and by making it more obligatory, more systematic and more pervasive than others. The grouping, however, involves a gradation, as is indeed the case with other typological groupings, with some languages manifesting the relevant characteristic more strikingly than others. There are several characteristics that can be correlated with the relative prominence that languages attach to verbal categories. For example, tense-prominent languages tend to have mostly active but not stative verbs. They also tend to keep adjectives as a distinct category, or group them with nouns but not with verbs. Verbal forms used for foregrounding generally belong to the most prominent verbal category. These and other similar correlations make this typological classification worth pursuing. The book also contains a descriptive study of the three verbal categories.
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: World wide Web.
    655
      
    0
    a| Electronic books.
    710
    2
      
    a| Ebook Central - Academic Complete
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://RE5QY4SB7X.search.serialssolutions.com/?V=1.0&L=RE5QY4SB7X&S=JCs&C=TC0000283189&T=marc
    596
      
      
    a| 1
    999
      
      
    a| XX(7178035.1) w| WEB i| 7178035-1001 l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET

Availability

Google Preview

Read Online