Item Details

Confronting Black Jacobins: The United States, the Haitian Revolution, and the Origins of the Dominican Republic

by Gerald Horne
Format
Book
Published
New York : Monthly Review Press, [2015]
Language
English
Variant Title
United States, the Haitian Revolution, and the origins of the Dominican Republic
ISBN
9781583675625, 1583675620, 9781583675632, 1583675639
Summary
"The Haitian Revolution, the product of the first successful slave revolt, was truly world-historic in its impact. When Haiti declared independence in 1804, the leading powers--France, Great Britain, and Spain--suffered an ignominious defeat and the New World was remade. The island revolution also had a profound impact on Haiti's mainland neighbor, the United States. Inspiring the enslaved and partisans of emancipation while striking terror throughout the Southern slaveocracy, it propelled the fledgling nation one step closer to civil war. Gerald Horne's pathbreaking new work explores the complex and often fraught relationship between the United States and the island of Hispaniola. Giving particular attention to the responses of African Americans, Horne surveys the reaction in the United States to the revolutionary process in the nation that became Haiti, the splitting of the island in 1844, which led to the formation of the Dominican Republic, and the failed attempt by the United States to annex both in the 1870s. Drawing upon a rich collection of archival and other primary source materials, Horne deftly weaves together a disparate array of voices--world leaders and diplomats, slaveholders, white abolitionists, and the freedom fighters he terms Black Jacobins. Horne at once illuminates the tangled conflicts of the colonial powers, the commercial interests and imperial ambitions of U.S. elites, and the brutality and tenacity of the American slaveholding class, while never losing sight of the freedom struggles of Africans both on the island and on the mainland, which sought the fulfillment of the emancipatory promise of 18th century republicanism"--Provided by publisher.
Contents
  • Confronting the rise of Black Jacobins, 1791-1793
  • Confronting Black Jacobins on the march, 1793-1797
  • Confronting the surge of Black Jacobins, 1797-1803
  • Confronting the triumph of Black Jacobins, 1804-1819
  • Hemispheric Africans and Black Jacobins, 1820-1829
  • U.S. Negroes and Black Jacobins, 1830-1839
  • Black Jacobins weakened, 1840-1849
  • Black Jacobins under siege, 1850-1859
  • The U.S. Civil War, the Spanish takeover of the Dominican Republic and U.S. Negro emigrants in Haiti, 1860-1863
  • Haiti to be annexed and reenslaved? 1863-1870
  • Annex Hispaniola and deport U.S. Negroes there? 1870-1871.
Description
423 pages ; 21 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

  • LEADER 04671pam a2200661 i 4500
    001 u6651862
    003 SIRSI
    005 20151216142255.0
    008 150816t20152015nyu b 001 0 eng
    010
      
      
    a| 2015019276
    020
      
      
    a| 9781583675625 q| (paperback) q| (alkaline paper)
    020
      
      
    a| 1583675620 q| (paperback) q| (alkaline paper)
    020
      
      
    a| 9781583675632 q| (cloth) q| (alkaline paper)
    020
      
      
    a| 1583675639 q| (cloth) q| (alkaline paper)
    035
      
      
    a| (Sirsi) cis31419956
    035
      
      
    a| (OCoLC)918986500 z| (OCoLC)907094573
    040
      
      
    a| DLC b| eng e| rda c| DLC d| YDXCP d| BDX d| OCLCO d| OCLCF d| OCLCO d| NAM d| OCLCO d| CDX
    042
      
      
    a| pcc
    043
      
      
    a| n-us--- a| nwht--- a| nwdr---
    050
    0
    0
    a| E183.8.H2 b| H67 2015
    082
    0
    0
    a| 327.7307294 2| 23
    100
    1
      
    a| Horne, Gerald e| author.
    245
    1
    0
    a| Confronting Black Jacobins : b| the United States, the Haitian Revolution, and the origins of the Dominican Republic / c| by Gerald Horne.
    246
    3
    0
    a| United States, the Haitian Revolution, and the origins of the Dominican Republic
    264
      
    1
    a| New York : b| Monthly Review Press, c| [2015]
    264
      
    4
    c| ©2015
    300
      
      
    a| 423 pages ; c| 21 cm
    336
      
      
    a| text b| txt 2| rdacontent
    337
      
      
    a| unmediated b| n 2| rdamedia
    338
      
      
    a| volume b| nc 2| rdacarrier
    504
      
      
    a| Includes bibliographical references and index.
    505
    0
      
    a| Confronting the rise of Black Jacobins, 1791-1793 -- Confronting Black Jacobins on the march, 1793-1797 -- Confronting the surge of Black Jacobins, 1797-1803 -- Confronting the triumph of Black Jacobins, 1804-1819 -- Hemispheric Africans and Black Jacobins, 1820-1829 -- U.S. Negroes and Black Jacobins, 1830-1839 -- Black Jacobins weakened, 1840-1849 -- Black Jacobins under siege, 1850-1859 -- The U.S. Civil War, the Spanish takeover of the Dominican Republic and U.S. Negro emigrants in Haiti, 1860-1863 -- Haiti to be annexed and reenslaved? 1863-1870 -- Annex Hispaniola and deport U.S. Negroes there? 1870-1871.
    520
    2
      
    a| "The Haitian Revolution, the product of the first successful slave revolt, was truly world-historic in its impact. When Haiti declared independence in 1804, the leading powers--France, Great Britain, and Spain--suffered an ignominious defeat and the New World was remade. The island revolution also had a profound impact on Haiti's mainland neighbor, the United States. Inspiring the enslaved and partisans of emancipation while striking terror throughout the Southern slaveocracy, it propelled the fledgling nation one step closer to civil war. Gerald Horne's pathbreaking new work explores the complex and often fraught relationship between the United States and the island of Hispaniola. Giving particular attention to the responses of African Americans, Horne surveys the reaction in the United States to the revolutionary process in the nation that became Haiti, the splitting of the island in 1844, which led to the formation of the Dominican Republic, and the failed attempt by the United States to annex both in the 1870s. Drawing upon a rich collection of archival and other primary source materials, Horne deftly weaves together a disparate array of voices--world leaders and diplomats, slaveholders, white abolitionists, and the freedom fighters he terms Black Jacobins. Horne at once illuminates the tangled conflicts of the colonial powers, the commercial interests and imperial ambitions of U.S. elites, and the brutality and tenacity of the American slaveholding class, while never losing sight of the freedom struggles of Africans both on the island and on the mainland, which sought the fulfillment of the emancipatory promise of 18th century republicanism"--Provided by publisher.
    650
      
    0
    a| Blacks z| Haiti x| Politics and government.
    650
      
    0
    a| Jacobins z| Haiti x| History.
    650
      
    0
    a| African Americans x| Relations with Haitians x| History y| 19th century.
    650
      
    0
    a| Slavery x| Political aspects z| United States x| History y| 19th century.
    651
      
    0
    a| United States x| Relations z| Haiti.
    651
      
    0
    a| Haiti x| Relations z| United States.
    651
      
    0
    a| Haiti x| History y| Revolution, 1791-1804 x| Influence.
    651
      
    0
    a| Dominican Republic x| History y| 19th century.
    651
      
    0
    a| Hispaniola x| History y| 19th century.
    651
      
    0
    a| United States x| Territorial expansion x| History y| 19th century.
    596
      
      
    a| 3
    999
      
      
    a| E183.8 .H2 H67 2015 w| LC i| X031734108 k| MISSING l| CLEM-CONST m| CLEMONS t| BOOK

Availability

Google Preview

Library Location Map Availability Call Number
Clemons Missing N/A Unavailable