Item Details

America Is to Blame for Mexico's Drug War [electronic resource]: A Debate

Intelligence Squared
Format
Video; Computer Resource; Online Video; Online
Summary
From 2007 to 2009, nearly 10,000 people in Mexico died in drug-related violence. Who or what caused this? Some argue that it is Americans' insatiable demand for illicit drugs and the constant flow of guns from the United States, which arms the drug cartels. Others blame Mexico's own government, which, they claim, is so corrupt that it cannot clamp down on the cartels. Unable to ignore the rising violence spilling over the border, Congress approved
Release Date
2009
Run Time
104 min.
Language
Closed-captioned
Rating
11 & up
Notes
  • Encoded with permission for digital streaming by Films Media Group on August 01, 2014.
  • Films on Demand is distributed by Films Media Group for Films for the Humanities & Sciences, Cambridge Educational, Meridian Education, and Shopware.
  • Part of the series Intelligence Squared.
Contents
  • Introduction: Moderator John Donvan (3:39)
  • For the Motion: Fareed Zakaria (7:23)
  • Against the Motion: Asa Hutchinson (7:53)
  • For the Motion: Jeffrey Miron (6:25)
  • Against the Motion: Chris Cox (6:34)
  • For the Motion: Andrés Martinez (7:42)
  • Against the Motion: Jorge Castañeda (7:31)
  • Predebate Voting Results (1:07)
  • Q/A Panelists Argue Legalization (5:23)
  • Q/A U.S. Weapons (3:32)
  • Q/A Failed War (2:04)
  • Q/A Results of Criminalization and Gun Laws (4:04)
  • Q/A Decriminalization of Drugs (3:48)
  • Q/A Mexican Sovereignty and Intervention (4:10)
  • Q/A Transformation of Mexican National Economy (1:41)
  • Q/A How Would Drug Cartels Finance their Organization after Legalization? (2:10)
  • Q/A Moral Issue of Individual Rights (1:50)
  • Q/A Consequences of Legalization (2:13)
  • Q/A Alternatives for Drug Use Reduction (2:18)
  • Q/A Why Blame President Calderón? (3:47)
  • Q/A Blame Nixon's "War on Drugs" (1:39)
  • Moderator John Donvan (0:55)
  • Closing Statement: Against the Debate: Asa Hutchinson (2:10)
  • Closing Statement: For the Motion: Fareed Zakaria (2:18)
  • Closing Statement: Against the Motion: Chris Cox (1:37)
  • Closing Statement: For the Motion: Jeffrey Miron (2:07)
  • Closing Statement: Against the Motion: Jorge Castañeda (2:41)
  • Closing Statement: For the Motion: Andrés Martinez (0:48)
  • Post-Debate Voting Results (4:35)
  • Credits: America Is to Blame for Mexico's Drug War: A Debate (0:16)
Published
New York, N.Y. : Films Media Group, [2014], c2009.
Publisher no.
58308 Films Media Group
Access Restriction
Access requires authentication through Films on Demand.
Description
1 streaming video file (104 min.) : sd., col.
Mode of access: Internet.
System requirements: FOD playback platform.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

  • LEADER 04238ngm a2200505Ia 4500
    001 u6530494
    003 SIRSI
    005 20141009151047.0
    006 m|||| o||c| ||||||
    007 vz|czazuu
    007 cr|cna
    008 141009s2009 nyu104| ||||| o|||vleng d
    028
    4
    0
    a| 58308 b| Films Media Group
    035
      
      
    a| (Sirsi) o890211021
    035
      
      
    a| 100058308
    035
      
      
    a| (OCoLC)890211021
    040
      
      
    a| AzPhAEM
    041
    0
      
    a| eng j| eng
    245
    0
    0
    a| America Is to Blame for Mexico's Drug War h| [electronic resource] : b| A Debate / c| Intelligence Squared.
    260
    3
      
    a| New York, N.Y. : b| Films Media Group, c| [2014], c2009.
    300
      
      
    a| 1 streaming video file (104 min.) : b| sd., col.
    500
      
      
    a| Encoded with permission for digital streaming by Films Media Group on August 01, 2014.
    500
      
      
    a| Films on Demand is distributed by Films Media Group for Films for the Humanities & Sciences, Cambridge Educational, Meridian Education, and Shopware.
    500
      
      
    a| Part of the series Intelligence Squared.
    505
    0
      
    a| Introduction: Moderator John Donvan (3:39) -- For the Motion: Fareed Zakaria (7:23) -- Against the Motion: Asa Hutchinson (7:53) -- For the Motion: Jeffrey Miron (6:25) -- Against the Motion: Chris Cox (6:34) -- For the Motion: Andrés Martinez (7:42) -- Against the Motion: Jorge Castañeda (7:31) -- Predebate Voting Results (1:07) -- Q/A Panelists Argue Legalization (5:23) -- Q/A U.S. Weapons (3:32) -- Q/A Failed War (2:04) -- Q/A Results of Criminalization and Gun Laws (4:04) -- Q/A Decriminalization of Drugs (3:48) -- Q/A Mexican Sovereignty and Intervention (4:10) -- Q/A Transformation of Mexican National Economy (1:41) -- Q/A How Would Drug Cartels Finance their Organization after Legalization? (2:10) -- Q/A Moral Issue of Individual Rights (1:50) -- Q/A Consequences of Legalization (2:13) -- Q/A Alternatives for Drug Use Reduction (2:18) -- Q/A Why Blame President Calderón? (3:47) -- Q/A Blame Nixon's "War on Drugs" (1:39) -- Moderator John Donvan (0:55) -- Closing Statement: Against the Debate: Asa Hutchinson (2:10) -- Closing Statement: For the Motion: Fareed Zakaria (2:18) -- Closing Statement: Against the Motion: Chris Cox (1:37) -- Closing Statement: For the Motion: Jeffrey Miron (2:07) -- Closing Statement: Against the Motion: Jorge Castañeda (2:41) -- Closing Statement: For the Motion: Andrés Martinez (0:48) -- Post-Debate Voting Results (4:35) -- Credits: America Is to Blame for Mexico's Drug War: A Debate (0:16)
    506
    1
      
    a| Access requires authentication through Films on Demand.
    520
      
      
    a| From 2007 to 2009, nearly 10,000 people in Mexico died in drug-related violence. Who or what caused this? Some argue that it is Americans' insatiable demand for illicit drugs and the constant flow of guns from the United States, which arms the drug cartels. Others blame Mexico's own government, which, they claim, is so corrupt that it cannot clamp down on the cartels. Unable to ignore the rising violence spilling over the border, Congress approved 7| 00 million in security aid for Mexico and promised to increase the number of federal agents and intelligence analysts. Officials on both sides wonder whether this will make a dent in the problem. Should Mexico's government take full responsibility for what goes on within its own borders? Has our own "war on drugs" been ineffective, or even counterproductive?
    521
    2
      
    a| 11 & up.
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Internet.
    538
      
      
    a| System requirements: FOD playback platform.
    546
      
      
    a| Closed-captioned.
    650
      
    0
    a| Drug control z| Mexican-American Border Region.
    650
      
    0
    a| Drug traffic z| Mexico.
    650
      
    0
    a| Drug traffic z| North America.
    655
      
    0
    a| Educational films.
    655
      
    0
    a| Internet videos.
    655
      
    0
    a| Videorecording. 2| local
    710
    2
      
    a| Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm)
    710
    2
      
    a| Films Media Group.
    710
    2
      
    a| Intelligence Squared
    776
    0
    8
    i| Originally produced: d| Intelligence Squared, 2009.
    856
    4
    0
    z| Part of the Films on Demand collection. u| http://proxy01.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://digital.films.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?aid=29178&xtid=58308
    596
      
      
    a| 1
    999
      
      
    a| XX(6530494.1) w| WEB i| 6530494-1001 l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET

Availability

Google Preview