Item Details

Bandits, Gangsters and the Mafia: Russia, the Baltic States and the CIS Since 1992

Martin McCauley
Format
Book
Published
Harlow ; New York : Longman, 2001.
Language
English
ISBN
0582357640 (hbk.)
Contents
  • Map 1 Russian Federation xxii
  • Chapter 1 How and Why Did It Happen? 1
  • Roving bandit and the stationary bandit 1
  • Hedgehog and the fox 15
  • Khalyava 17
  • Power and property 19
  • Property rights 23
  • Marxist-Leninist legacy 26
  • Who is to blame? 27
  • Chapter 2 Brilliant Tactical but Disastrous Strategic Policies: the Gorbachev Era 31
  • Planned economy 32
  • Reforms from Khrushchev to Gorbachev 33
  • Enter Gorbachev 35
  • New team 37
  • Perestroika 37
  • 500-day programme 42
  • Glasnost 43
  • Yeltsin breaks with Gorbachev 44
  • 19th party conference 45
  • Congress of People's Deputies and the Supreme Soviet 46
  • Conflict within the party 48
  • First President 49
  • 28th party congress 50
  • Desperate measures 50
  • Russia awakes 52
  • Gorbachev assailed 55
  • President Yeltsin 56
  • Attempted coup of August 1991 57
  • Yeltsin triumphant 59
  • Nationalities 61
  • Foreign policy 64
  • Eastern Europe 66
  • Workers 66
  • Enterprise leasing 68
  • Why did the military allow the Soviet Union to disintegrate? 68
  • Gorbachev's legacy 70
  • Mafia 71
  • KGB and the mafia 74
  • Clan chiefs emerge 75
  • Why did the Soviet Union disappear? 84
  • Chapter 3 Tsar Boris the Bruiser: the First Presidency, 1991-96 88
  • Yeltsin's team 88
  • Confrontation in the Congress of People's Deputies 95
  • Civic Union appears 96
  • President and the 7th Congress 97
  • Conflict resumes 100
  • On the offensive 100
  • Towards a new constitution 103
  • Final thrust 105
  • Spoils of victory 110
  • Constitution and the first Duma 112
  • Federal Assembly 114
  • President's life-style 116
  • Political reactions 118
  • Budennovsk 119
  • Duma tests the President's power 119
  • Negotiating a peace 120
  • Duma elections of December 1995 121
  • Election results 125
  • Presidential race 127
  • Electoral campaign 130
  • Planned coup 133
  • Campaigning Chubais style 134
  • Korzhakov's final gamble 136
  • Chapter 4 Tsar Boris the Boozer: the Second Presidency, 1996-99 142
  • Lebed framed 143
  • Yeltsin reasserts himself 145
  • Banking war 149
  • Yeltsin and the October compromise 151
  • Berezovsky goes 153
  • Book scandal 153
  • Yeltsin revitalised 156
  • Chernomyrdin goes 157
  • Enter Kirienko 158
  • Russia devalues and defaults 161
  • Enter Chernomyrdin 163
  • Enter Stepashin 167
  • Enter Putin 169
  • New Duma 169
  • Tsar departs 172
  • Chapter 5 Tsar's Court: The Presidential Administration, the Security Council and the Government 174
  • Development of the administration 176
  • Presidential administration during the second presidency 182
  • Security Council 186
  • Other security agencies 189
  • Other advisory agencies 191
  • Government 192
  • Chapter 6 Colonels and Spies: Defence, Internal Affairs and the Security Forces 198
  • Military 198
  • Russian ministry of defence 200
  • Russian military doctrine 201
  • Retreat 202
  • Transdniestria 204
  • First Chechen war, 1994-96 206
  • Interbellum 210
  • Second Chechen war, 1999- 211
  • Health, drug abuse and Aids in the military 213
  • Nuclear arms 215
  • Military reform and doctrine 216
  • Internal affairs 219
  • Security 222
  • Security market 223
  • Barannikov departs 226
  • Kompromat wars 226
  • Enter the FSK 227
  • Enter the FSB 228
  • SVR 229
  • New men 231
  • Chapter 7 Moscow Does Not Rule, OK? Federalism and the Regions 232
  • Development of the Russian state 232
  • August 1991 to the end of the Soviet Union 233
  • Economic reform and conflict between the executive and legislature: January 1992-October 1993 234
  • Power to the executive: October 1993-summer 1994 236
  • New federal state: 1994-98 237
  • Federal state in crisis: 1998-99 239
  • A constitutional or a contractual federation? 241
  • Local government 244
  • Legislation of the subjects of the federation- 245
  • Regional economic performance 251
  • Regional subventions 252
  • Gubernatorial elections 255
  • Islam 256
  • Chapter 8 Bandit Capitalism 260
  • An overview 265
  • Shock therapy or the Washington consensus 266
  • Take-off: 2 January 1992 267
  • Privatisation 272
  • Russians abroad 277
  • Who got the loot? 278
  • Gazprom 279
  • Alfa Group 280
  • Menatep 281
  • Oneksimbank 283
  • Logovaz 285
  • Berezovsky penetrates the Kremlin 287
  • Media-Most 289
  • Media empires 290
  • Loans for shares scheme 290
  • Government bonds 294
  • Shuttle trading 298
  • Chapter 9 Agriculture: the Peasants Stay Poor 300
  • Land privatisation 302
  • Radical new measures 305
  • Nizhny Novegorod experiment 305
  • Rural politics 306
  • Global production and consumption 307
  • Agrarian political movements 308
  • Present situation 310
  • A land code 312
  • Chapter 10 A Society in Crisis 314
  • Demography 314
  • Education and health 321
  • Vodka 325
  • Drugs 326
  • Aids 327
  • Sex 331
  • Disabled 333
  • Women 334
  • Unemployment and poverty 336
  • Migration 340
  • Golden oldies 341
  • Orthodox Church 342
  • Chapter 11 Foreign Policy: Will the Empire Strike Back? 348
  • Near abroad 348
  • Far abroad 356
  • Chapter 12 Success Not Failure: the Baltic States 362
  • Estonia 363
  • Latvia 365
  • Lithuania 366
  • Economic success and failure 371
  • Security 375
  • Chapter 13 Will the Imams Return? the Commonwealth of Independent States 379
  • Migration 379
  • Belarus 379
  • Ukraine 382
  • Moldova 384
  • Caucasus 385
  • Central Asia 389
  • Epilogue: The Spy Who Took Over Russia: Vladimir Putin 393.
Description
xxi, 439 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps, ports. ; 24 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (p. 419-425) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    g| Map 1 t| Russian Federation g| xxii -- g| Chapter 1 t| How and Why Did It Happen? g| 1 -- t| Roving bandit and the stationary bandit g| 1 -- t| Hedgehog and the fox g| 15 -- t| Khalyava g| 17 -- t| Power and property g| 19 -- t| Property rights g| 23 -- t| Marxist-Leninist legacy g| 26 -- t| Who is to blame? g| 27 -- g| Chapter 2 t| Brilliant Tactical but Disastrous Strategic Policies: the Gorbachev Era g| 31 -- t| Planned economy g| 32 -- t| Reforms from Khrushchev to Gorbachev g| 33 -- t| Enter Gorbachev g| 35 -- t| New team g| 37 -- t| Perestroika g| 37 -- t| 500-day programme g| 42 -- t| Glasnost g| 43 -- t| Yeltsin breaks with Gorbachev g| 44 -- t| 19th party conference g| 45 -- t| Congress of People's Deputies and the Supreme Soviet g| 46 -- t| Conflict within the party g| 48 -- t| First President g| 49 -- t| 28th party congress g| 50 -- t| Desperate measures g| 50 -- t| Russia awakes g| 52 -- t| Gorbachev assailed g| 55 -- t| President Yeltsin g| 56 -- t| Attempted coup of August 1991 g| 57 -- t| Yeltsin triumphant g| 59 -- t| Nationalities g| 61 -- t| Foreign policy g| 64 -- t| Eastern Europe g| 66 -- t| Workers g| 66 -- t| Enterprise leasing g| 68 -- t| Why did the military allow the Soviet Union to disintegrate? g| 68 -- t| Gorbachev's legacy g| 70 -- t| Mafia g| 71 -- t| KGB and the mafia g| 74 -- t| Clan chiefs emerge g| 75 -- t| Why did the Soviet Union disappear? g| 84 -- g| Chapter 3 t| Tsar Boris the Bruiser: the First Presidency, 1991-96 g| 88 -- t| Yeltsin's team g| 88 -- t| Confrontation in the Congress of People's Deputies g| 95 -- t| Civic Union appears g| 96 -- t| President and the 7th Congress g| 97 -- t| Conflict resumes g| 100 -- t| On the offensive g| 100 -- t| Towards a new constitution g| 103 -- t| Final thrust g| 105 -- t| Spoils of victory g| 110 -- t| Constitution and the first Duma g| 112 -- t| Federal Assembly g| 114 -- t| President's life-style g| 116 -- t| Political reactions g| 118 -- t| Budennovsk g| 119 -- t| Duma tests the President's power g| 119 -- t| Negotiating a peace g| 120 -- t| Duma elections of December 1995 g| 121 -- t| Election results g| 125 -- t| Presidential race g| 127 -- t| Electoral campaign g| 130 -- t| Planned coup g| 133 -- t| Campaigning Chubais style g| 134 -- t| Korzhakov's final gamble g| 136 -- g| Chapter 4 t| Tsar Boris the Boozer: the Second Presidency, 1996-99 g| 142 -- t| Lebed framed g| 143 -- t| Yeltsin reasserts himself g| 145 -- t| Banking war g| 149 -- t| Yeltsin and the October compromise g| 151 -- t| Berezovsky goes g| 153 -- t| Book scandal g| 153 -- t| Yeltsin revitalised g| 156 -- t| Chernomyrdin goes g| 157 -- t| Enter Kirienko g| 158 -- t| Russia devalues and defaults g| 161 -- t| Enter Chernomyrdin g| 163 -- t| Enter Stepashin g| 167 -- t| Enter Putin g| 169 -- t| New Duma g| 169 -- t| Tsar departs g| 172 -- g| Chapter 5 t| Tsar's Court: The Presidential Administration, the Security Council and the Government g| 174 -- t| Development of the administration g| 176 -- t| Presidential administration during the second presidency g| 182 -- t| Security Council g| 186 -- t| Other security agencies g| 189 -- t| Other advisory agencies g| 191 -- t| Government g| 192 -- g| Chapter 6 t| Colonels and Spies: Defence, Internal Affairs and the Security Forces g| 198 -- t| Military g| 198 -- t| Russian ministry of defence g| 200 -- t| Russian military doctrine g| 201 -- t| Retreat g| 202 -- t| Transdniestria g| 204 -- t| First Chechen war, 1994-96 g| 206 -- t| Interbellum g| 210 -- t| Second Chechen war, 1999- g| 211 -- t| Health, drug abuse and Aids in the military g| 213 -- t| Nuclear arms g| 215 -- t| Military reform and doctrine g| 216 -- t| Internal affairs g| 219 -- t| Security g| 222 -- t| Security market g| 223 -- t| Barannikov departs g| 226 -- t| Kompromat wars g| 226 -- t| Enter the FSK g| 227 -- t| Enter the FSB g| 228 -- t| SVR g| 229 -- t| New men g| 231 -- g| Chapter 7 t| Moscow Does Not Rule, OK? Federalism and the Regions g| 232 -- t| Development of the Russian state g| 232 -- t| August 1991 to the end of the Soviet Union g| 233 -- t| Economic reform and conflict between the executive and legislature: January 1992-October 1993 g| 234 -- t| Power to the executive: October 1993-summer 1994 g| 236 -- t| New federal state: 1994-98 g| 237 -- t| Federal state in crisis: 1998-99 g| 239 -- t| A constitutional or a contractual federation? g| 241 -- t| Local government g| 244 -- t| Legislation of the subjects of the federation- g| 245 -- t| Regional economic performance g| 251 -- t| Regional subventions g| 252 -- t| Gubernatorial elections g| 255 -- t| Islam g| 256 -- g| Chapter 8 t| Bandit Capitalism g| 260 -- t| An overview g| 265 -- t| Shock therapy or the Washington consensus g| 266 -- t| Take-off: 2 January 1992 g| 267 -- t| Privatisation g| 272 -- t| Russians abroad g| 277 -- t| Who got the loot? g| 278 -- t| Gazprom g| 279 -- t| Alfa Group g| 280 -- t| Menatep g| 281 -- t| Oneksimbank g| 283 -- t| Logovaz g| 285 -- t| Berezovsky penetrates the Kremlin g| 287 -- t| Media-Most g| 289 -- t| Media empires g| 290 -- t| Loans for shares scheme g| 290 -- t| Government bonds g| 294 -- t| Shuttle trading g| 298 -- g| Chapter 9 t| Agriculture: the Peasants Stay Poor g| 300 -- t| Land privatisation g| 302 -- t| Radical new measures g| 305 -- t| Nizhny Novegorod experiment g| 305 -- t| Rural politics g| 306 -- t| Global production and consumption g| 307 -- t| Agrarian political movements g| 308 -- t| Present situation g| 310 -- t| A land code g| 312 -- g| Chapter 10 t| A Society in Crisis g| 314 -- t| Demography g| 314 -- t| Education and health g| 321 -- t| Vodka g| 325 -- t| Drugs g| 326 -- t| Aids g| 327 -- t| Sex g| 331 -- t| Disabled g| 333 -- t| Women g| 334 -- t| Unemployment and poverty g| 336 -- t| Migration g| 340 -- t| Golden oldies g| 341 -- t| Orthodox Church g| 342 -- g| Chapter 11 t| Foreign Policy: Will the Empire Strike Back? g| 348 -- t| Near abroad g| 348 -- t| Far abroad g| 356 -- g| Chapter 12 t| Success Not Failure: the Baltic States g| 362 -- t| Estonia g| 363 -- t| Latvia g| 365 -- t| Lithuania g| 366 -- t| Economic success and failure g| 371 -- t| Security g| 375 -- g| Chapter 13 t| Will the Imams Return? the Commonwealth of Independent States g| 379 -- t| Migration g| 379 -- t| Belarus g| 379 -- t| Ukraine g| 382 -- t| Moldova g| 384 -- t| Caucasus g| 385 -- t| Central Asia g| 389 -- t| Epilogue: The Spy Who Took Over Russia: Vladimir Putin g| 393.
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    a| Russia (Federation) x| History y| 1991-
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